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I am trying to build a binary search tree, however, it is vital for the algorithm that I am implementing to do so with a vector to diminish cache misses. My original idea was to adapt something similar to the heap insertion technique , since data placement is the same and, once you add an item, you need to bubble sort up the branch to make sure the properties of each data structure are respected (thus the O(log n) complexity). However, adapting the insert function has proven trickier than anticipated.

This is the original working code for the binary heap:

template <typename DataType>
void BinHeap<DataType>:: Insert(const DataType& value)
{
    data.push_back(value);
    if(data.size() > 1)
    {
        BubbleUp(data.size() -1);
    }
}

template <typename DataType>
void BinHeap<DataType>::BubbleUp(unsigned pos)
{
    int parentPos = Parent(pos);
    if(parentPos > 0 && data[parentPos] < data[pos])
    {
        std::swap(data[parentPos], data[pos]);
        BubbleUp(parentPos);
    }
}

And here is my attempt to adapt it into a vector based Binary Search Tree (please do not mind the odd naming of the class, as this is still not the final version):

template <typename DataType>
void BinHeap<DataType>:: Insert(const DataType& value)
{
    data.push_back(value);
    if(data.size() > 1)
    {
        BubbleUp(data.size() -1);
    }
}

template <typename DataType>
void BinHeap<DataType>::BubbleUp(unsigned pos)
{
    int parentPos = Parent(pos);
    bool isLeftSon = LeftSon(parentPos) == pos; 

    if(parentPos >= 0)
    {
        if(isLeftSon && ( data[parentPos] < data[pos] ) )
        {
            std::swap(data[parentPos] , data[pos]);
        }
        else if (data[parentPos] > data[pos])// RightSon
        {
            std::swap(data[parentPos] , data[pos]);
        }

        BubbleUp(parentPos-1);
        BubbleDown(parentPos-1);
    }
}

template <typename DataType>
void BinHeap<DataType>::BubbleDown(unsigned pos)
{
    int leftChild = LeftSon(pos);
    int rightChild = RightSon(pos);

    bool leftExists = leftChild < data.size() && leftChild > 0;
    bool rightExists = rightChild < data.size() && rightChild > 0;

    // No children
    if(!leftExists && !rightExists)
    {
        return;
    }

    if(leftExists && data[pos] < data[leftChild])
    {
        std::swap(data[leftChild] , data[pos]);
    }
    else if (rightExists && data[pos] > data[rightChild])
    {
        std::swap(data[rightChild] , data[pos]);
    }
}

This approach is able to guarantee that the properties of the BST are respected locally, but not across siblings or ancestors (grandparents, etc). For example, if every number from 1 to 16 is inserted in order, 12 will have a left child of 6 and right child of 14. However, it parent 16 will have a left child of 8 and a right child of 12 (thus 6 is on the right subtree of 16). I feel my current approach is over complicating the process, but I am not sure how to rearrange it to make the necessary changes in an efficient manner. Any insight would be greatly appreciated.

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Have you look at std::push_heap –  Jarod42 Jul 21 '14 at 18:01
    
I am familiar with it, but that works for a binary heap. What I need in this case is a binary search tree. And I believe the first implementation follows the general idea of push_heap. –  Bruno Ayllon Jul 21 '14 at 18:08
    
It is a false requirement. The data structure you actually want is a B+tree. If you insist on using std::vector, insert the new element into a sorted array, and use std::binary_search. –  jxh Jul 21 '14 at 18:08
    
A heap structure does not allow for efficient binary searches. It's good for finding min/max (in constant time!) and for traversing a list in order and insertion/deletion operations are efficient. But not for binary searches. Also, your if() structure in BubbleUp() doesn't make much sense as you do the same action in both branches. –  user823981 Jul 21 '14 at 18:10
    
I am building a binary search tree, not a heap. I am merely storing the data in a vector using a similar idea. –  Bruno Ayllon Jul 21 '14 at 18:11

2 Answers 2

The realistic answer to the question title (which is at the time I composed this answer "How to create the insert function for a binary search tree built with a vector?") is: Don't do that!

It is clear from your code that you are trying to preserve the compact storage and self-balancing properties of a heap while also wishing it to be searchable via classic left/right child tree navigation. But, the heap trick of using (index-1)/2 to locate the parent node only works for a "perfectly balanced" tree. That is, the N element array is perfectly packed from 0 to N-1. And then, you expect an in-order walk of this tree to be sorted (if you didn't, then your binary left/right search navigation would not be able to find the right node).

Thus, you are maintaining a sorted set of elements in your array. Except, you have some strange rules for how to navigate the array to get the sorted order.

There is no way that your scheme can maintain a binary sorted array any simpler than a scheme that maintains a plain sorted array. The node manipulations only lead to a complicated piece of software that is difficult to understand, to maintain, and reason about correctly. A sorted array, on the other hand, is easy to understand and maintain, and is easy to see how it leads to a correct result. The binary search (or optionally, dictionary search) is fast.

While maintaining a sorted array requires a linear insertion logic, your scheme must be at least as complex, because it is also maintaining a sorted set of elements in the array.

If you want a data structure that is hardware data cache friendly, and provides logarithmic insertion and search, use a B+-tree. It is a little more complex than your average data structure, but this is a case where the complexity can be worth it. Especially if regular trees just cause too much data cache thrash. As a bit of advice, optimal performance usually results if an interior node (with keys) is sized to fit within a cache line or two.

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After doing a lot of research and experimentation, turn out that my understanding of the paper was incomplete. Implementing it as a tree was the sensible solution. Thanks to everyone for the help. –  Bruno Ayllon Aug 4 '14 at 2:12

I really don't understand the Big Picture, or overall view, of what you are trying to accomplish. There are many existing functions, and libraries that perform the functionality that I think you want.

Efficient Data Search
Since you are using a vector, placing a B-Tree into a vector seems moot. The general situation is that you maintain a sorted vector and perform a binary_search, upper_bound, or lower_bound on the array. Provided that your program is performing more searches than inserts, this should be faster than traversing a binary tree inside an array.

The maintenance is much easier using an array of sorted values than performing maintenance on a Balanced Binary Tree. The maintenance consists of appending a value, then sorting.

The sorted vector technique also uses less memory. There is no need for child links so you save 2 indices for every slot in the vector.

Using A Binary Tree
There are many examples on the 'net for using Binary Trees. Looks like you want to maintain a balanced tree, so you should search the web for "c++ example balanced binary tree array". If the examples use pointers, replace the pointers by an index.

Trees are complex data structures and have maintenance overhead. I'm not sure if balancing a tree in a vector is slower than sorting a vector; but it is usually more work and more complex.

Usage Criteria
With modern computers executing instructions in the nanosecond time period, searching performance differences become negligible with huge amounts of data. So for small amounts of data, a linear search may be faster than a binary search, due to overhead costs in a binary search.

Similarly, with a binary tree and a sorted array. The overhead of node processing may be more than the overhead of sorting a vector, and only negligible for large amounts of data.

Development time is crucial. The time spent developing a specialized binary tree in a vector is definitely more than using an std::vector, std::sort, and std::lower_bound. These items are already implemented and tested. So while you are developing this specialized algorithm and data structure, another person using a sorted vector could be finished and onto another project by the time you finish your development.

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