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I am trying to generate random base32 numbers that are 6 characters or less. This should give approximately 1 billion different combinations.

I have created a program to generate these “random” numbers. However, it appears that it generates a duplicate on average every 40,000 generations.

Why are these “random” numbers duplicating so often when there are over a billion different combinations?

Here is my code:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int seed = Environment.TickCount;
    Random r = new Random(seed);

    Dictionary<int, int> resultDictionary = new Dictionary<int, int>();
    for (int x = 1; x <= 1000; x++)
    {
        Dictionary<string, int> dictionary = new Dictionary<string, int>();
        try
        {
            while (true)
            {
                int rand = r.Next(0, 1073741823);
                CrockfordBase32Encoding encoding = new CrockfordBase32Encoding();
                string encodedRand = encoding.Encode((ulong)rand, false);
                dictionary.Add(encodedRand, rand);
            }
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
        }
        Console.WriteLine(string.Format("{0} - {1}", x, dictionary.Count));
        resultDictionary.Add(x, dictionary.Count);
        x++;
    }

    Console.WriteLine();
    Console.WriteLine("Average Number Before Duplicate: " + resultDictionary.Average(x => x.Value));
    Console.ReadLine();
}
share|improve this question
33  
14  
Because it's random? –  Chris Jul 21 at 21:25
18  
Random is not like drawing cards from a card deck, where you no longer get that card when it's drawn. Every number you get is still in play. –  Robert Harvey Jul 21 at 21:25
17  
8  
guaranteed to be random. xkcd.com/221 –  EZI Jul 21 at 21:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 107 down vote accepted

This is similar to the Birthday Problem. Given a group of n people, What is the probability that two share the same birthday1? It's higher than you'd think.

In your case, what are the odds that randomly picking a number between 0 and 1,073,741,823 n times will give you a duplicate?

One approximation from the link above is 1-exp(-(n*n)/(2*d)). If n=40,000 that equates to about a 52.5% probability that a duplicate is chosen, so seeing duplicates after 40,000 picks on average seems reasonable.


1assuming that birthdays are uniformly distributed universally, which is not the case in reality but is "close enough" and makes the math easier

share|improve this answer
9  
The first sentence should be: "What are the chances that n people chosen at random all have different birthdays?" –  immibis Jul 22 at 7:34
8  
Actually a funny psychological problem, because people expect randomness to almost never yield the same result. A variation of the birthday paradox: If you let people guess many dice-rolls, they will almost never guess the same number twice in a row, although it happens quite often. -> If you program a shuffle+repeat-mode for music players, you have to fake your results and make the same song less likely to play again, or it won't feel random enough for most people ;-) –  Falco Jul 22 at 8:01
11  
@Falco My old MP3 player would "shuffle+repeat" by building a list of all songs, shuffling the list, then playing through it in a loop. In this way, once I heard a song, I would absolutely not hear it again until all other songs had played ;) Still random! –  Niet the Dark Absol Jul 22 at 9:46
1  
@Damon that too. But my correction was to the second half - "share the same birthday" should be "have different birthdays" –  immibis Jul 22 at 9:54
3  
@Damon: It depends what you mean by "very non-equidistributed". Nunnikhoven (jstor.org/stable/2685309) has used USA birthday distribution data and shown that the true probabilities differ in the 3rd decimal place from those calculated by assuming uniform distribution of birthdays. Many would find that error on the order of 0.1% is acceptable. –  bdemarest Jul 22 at 19:26

This is known as the Birthday Problem and is just basic probability-theory.

The probability that N random numbers in the range 1 through K does not give a duplicate is:

enter image description here
enter image description here

To calculate the chance of getting at least one duplicate subtract the value from 1.

In your case it evaluates to

P(40000, 1073741823) = 1 - p(40000, 1073741823)

By using Wolfram Alpha to do the calculation the result is

0.5252888122305790

which means it's slightly more than 50% chance you'll get a duplicate. As you produce more numbers, you'll get duplicates more and more often.

Here are some more evaluations of N:

   N      Result
 40000    0.5253
100000    0.9905
200000    0.9999
share|improve this answer
2  
@user11153 It would've been nice if you edited the text to describe the new formula, since the images is the formula for not having a duplicate. Remember when you edit questions/answers to make sure they mean the same afterwards. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Jul 22 at 16:05

The random number generator included in the Framework is pseudo-random without any guarantee of random number distribution. If you are concerned about distribution patterns, consider this article: http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/15102/NET-random-number-generators-and-distributions

Nevertheless, my statistics professors (not one) used to say, "There is a small lie, a big lie, and there is Statistics".

First the full code, so people don't have to scour the internet looking for class implementations to test:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Threading;

namespace ConsoleApplication2
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var r = RandomProvider.GetThreadRandom();

            Dictionary<int, int> resultDictionary = new Dictionary<int, int>();
            for (int x = 1; x <= 1000; x++)
            {
                Dictionary<string, int> dictionary = new Dictionary<string, int>();
                try
                {
                    while (true)
                    {
                        int rand = r.Next(0, 1073741823);
                        CrockfordBase32Encoding encoding = new CrockfordBase32Encoding();
                        string encodedRand = encoding.Encode((ulong)rand, false);
                        dictionary.Add(encodedRand, rand);
                    }
                }
                catch (Exception)
                {
                }
                Console.WriteLine("{0} - {1}", x, dictionary.Count);
                resultDictionary.Add(x, dictionary.Count);
                x++;
            }

            Console.WriteLine();
            Console.WriteLine("Average Number Before Duplicate: " + resultDictionary.Average(x => x.Value));
            Console.WriteLine("Minimum Number Before Duplicate: " + resultDictionary.Min(x => x.Value));
            Console.WriteLine("Maximum Number Before Duplicate: " + resultDictionary.Max(x => x.Value));
            Console.WriteLine(" Median Number Before Duplicate: " + resultDictionary.Select(x=>x.Value).Median());
            Console.ReadLine();
        }


    }

    public static class Extensions
    {
        public static double Median<T>(this IEnumerable<T> list)
        {
            List<double> orderedList = list.Select(s=>Convert.ToDouble(s))
                .OrderBy(numbers => numbers)
                .ToList();

            int listSize = orderedList.Count;
            double result;

            if (listSize % 2 == 0) // even
            {
                int midIndex = listSize / 2;
                result = ((orderedList.ElementAt(midIndex - 1) +
                           orderedList.ElementAt(midIndex)) / 2);
            }
            else // odd
            {
                double element = (double)listSize / 2;
                element = Math.Round(element, MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero);

                result = orderedList.ElementAt((int)(element - 1));
            }

            return result;
        } 
    }


    public static class RandomProvider
    {
        private static int seed = Environment.TickCount;

        private static ThreadLocal<Random> randomWrapper = new ThreadLocal<Random>(() =>
            new Random(Interlocked.Increment(ref seed))
            );

        public static Random GetThreadRandom()
        {
            return randomWrapper.Value;
        }
    }

    public class CrockfordBase32Encoding
    {
        const int Base = 32;
        const int CheckDigitBase = 37;

        static readonly IDictionary<int, char> valueEncodings;
        static readonly IDictionary<int, char> checkDigitEncodings;
        static readonly IDictionary<char, int> valueDecodings;
        static readonly IDictionary<char, int> checkDigitDecodings;
        static CrockfordBase32Encoding()
        {
            var symbols = new SymbolDefinitions();
            valueEncodings = symbols.ValueEncodings;
            checkDigitEncodings = symbols.CheckDigitEncodings;
            valueDecodings = symbols.ValueDecodings;
            checkDigitDecodings = symbols.CheckDigitDecodings;
        }

        public string Encode(ulong input, bool includeCheckDigit)
        {
            var chunks = SplitInto5BitChunks(input);
            var characters = chunks.Select(chunk => valueEncodings[chunk]);

            if (includeCheckDigit)
            {
                var checkValue = (int)(input % CheckDigitBase);
                characters = characters.Concat(new[] { checkDigitEncodings[checkValue] });
            }

            return new string(characters.ToArray());
        }

        internal static IEnumerable<byte> SplitInto5BitChunks(ulong input)
        {
            const int bitsPerChunk = 5;
            const int shift = (sizeof(ulong) * 8) - bitsPerChunk;
            var chunks = new List<byte>();
            do
            {
                var lastChunk = input << shift >> shift;
                chunks.Insert(0, (byte)lastChunk);
                input = input >> bitsPerChunk;
            } while (input > 0);
            return chunks;
        }

        public ulong? Decode(string encodedString, bool treatLastCharacterAsCheckDigit)
        {
            if (encodedString == null)
                throw new ArgumentNullException("encodedString");

            if (encodedString.Length == 0)
                return null;

            IEnumerable<char> charactersInReverse = encodedString.Reverse().ToArray();

            int? expectedCheckValue = null;
            if (treatLastCharacterAsCheckDigit)
            {
                var checkDigit = charactersInReverse.First();
                if (!checkDigitDecodings.ContainsKey(checkDigit)) return null;
                expectedCheckValue = checkDigitDecodings[checkDigit];

                charactersInReverse = charactersInReverse.Skip(1);
            }

            ulong number = 0;
            ulong currentBase = 1;
            foreach (var character in charactersInReverse)
            {
                if (!valueDecodings.ContainsKey(character)) return null;

                var value = valueDecodings[character];
                number += (ulong)value * currentBase;

                currentBase *= Base;
            }

            if (expectedCheckValue.HasValue &&
                (int)(number % CheckDigitBase) != expectedCheckValue)
                return null;

            return number;
        }
    }

    internal class SymbolDefinitions : List<SymbolDefinition>
    {
        readonly List<SymbolDefinition> extraCheckDigits = new List<SymbolDefinition>();

        public SymbolDefinitions()
        {
            AddRange(new[]
            {
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 0, EncodeSymbol = '0', DecodeSymbols = new[] { '0', 'O', 'o' } },
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 1, EncodeSymbol = '1', DecodeSymbols = new[] { '1', 'I', 'i', 'L', 'l' } },
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 2, EncodeSymbol = '2', DecodeSymbols = new[] { '2' } },
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 3, EncodeSymbol = '3', DecodeSymbols = new[] { '3' } },
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 4, EncodeSymbol = '4', DecodeSymbols = new[] { '4' } },
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 5, EncodeSymbol = '5', DecodeSymbols = new[] { '5' } },
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 6, EncodeSymbol = '6', DecodeSymbols = new[] { '6' } },
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 7, EncodeSymbol = '7', DecodeSymbols = new[] { '7' } },
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 8, EncodeSymbol = '8', DecodeSymbols = new[] { '8' } },
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 9, EncodeSymbol = '9', DecodeSymbols = new[] { '9' } },
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 10, EncodeSymbol = 'A', DecodeSymbols = new[] { 'A', 'a' } },
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 11, EncodeSymbol = 'B', DecodeSymbols = new[] { 'B', 'b' } },
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 12, EncodeSymbol = 'C', DecodeSymbols = new[] { 'C', 'c' } },
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 13, EncodeSymbol = 'D', DecodeSymbols = new[] { 'D', 'd' } },
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 14, EncodeSymbol = 'E', DecodeSymbols = new[] { 'E', 'e' } },
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 15, EncodeSymbol = 'F', DecodeSymbols = new[] { 'F', 'f' } },
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 16, EncodeSymbol = 'G', DecodeSymbols = new[] { 'G', 'g' } },
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 17, EncodeSymbol = 'H', DecodeSymbols = new[] { 'H', 'h' } },
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 18, EncodeSymbol = 'J', DecodeSymbols = new[] { 'J', 'j' } },
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 19, EncodeSymbol = 'K', DecodeSymbols = new[] { 'K', 'k' } },
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 20, EncodeSymbol = 'M', DecodeSymbols = new[] { 'M', 'm' } },
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 21, EncodeSymbol = 'N', DecodeSymbols = new[] { 'N', 'n' } },
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 22, EncodeSymbol = 'P', DecodeSymbols = new[] { 'P', 'p' } },
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 23, EncodeSymbol = 'Q', DecodeSymbols = new[] { 'Q', 'q' } },
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 24, EncodeSymbol = 'R', DecodeSymbols = new[] { 'R', 'r' } },
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 25, EncodeSymbol = 'S', DecodeSymbols = new[] { 'S', 's' } },
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 26, EncodeSymbol = 'T', DecodeSymbols = new[] { 'T', 't' } },
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 27, EncodeSymbol = 'V', DecodeSymbols = new[] { 'V', 'v' } },
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 28, EncodeSymbol = 'W', DecodeSymbols = new[] { 'W', 'w' } },
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 29, EncodeSymbol = 'X', DecodeSymbols = new[] { 'X', 'x' } },
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 30, EncodeSymbol = 'Y', DecodeSymbols = new[] { 'Y', 'y' } },
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 31, EncodeSymbol = 'Z', DecodeSymbols = new[] { 'Z', 'z' } },
            });

            extraCheckDigits.AddRange(new[]
            {
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 32, EncodeSymbol = '*', DecodeSymbols = new[] { '*' } },
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 33, EncodeSymbol = '~', DecodeSymbols = new[] { '~' } },
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 34, EncodeSymbol = '$', DecodeSymbols = new[] { '$' } },
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 35, EncodeSymbol = '=', DecodeSymbols = new[] { '=' } },
                new SymbolDefinition { Value = 36, EncodeSymbol = 'U', DecodeSymbols = new[] { 'U', 'u' } },
            });
        }

        public IDictionary<int, char> ValueEncodings
        {
            get
            {
                return this.ToDictionary(s => s.Value, s => s.EncodeSymbol);
            }
        }

        public IDictionary<int, char> CheckDigitEncodings
        {
            get
            {
                return this
                    .Union(extraCheckDigits)
                    .ToDictionary(s => s.Value, s => s.EncodeSymbol);
            }
        }

        public IDictionary<char, int> ValueDecodings
        {
            get
            {
                return this
                    .SelectMany(s => s.DecodeSymbols.Select(d => new { s.Value, DecodeSymbol = d }))
                    .ToDictionary(s => s.DecodeSymbol, s => s.Value);
            }
        }

        public IDictionary<char, int> CheckDigitDecodings
        {
            get
            {
                return this
                    .Union(extraCheckDigits)
                    .SelectMany(s => s.DecodeSymbols.Select(d => new { s.Value, DecodeSymbol = d }))
                    .ToDictionary(s => s.DecodeSymbol, s => s.Value);
            }
        }
    }

    internal class SymbolDefinition
    {
        public int Value { get; set; }
        public IEnumerable<char> DecodeSymbols { get; set; }
        public char EncodeSymbol { get; set; }
    }
}

I have added couple of additional output lines:

Average Number Before Duplicate: 41043.954
Minimum Number Before Duplicate: 2498
Maximum Number Before Duplicate: 127683
 Median Number Before Duplicate: 37860

Isn't that interesting, while the average is about 40k, look at the min and max, two orders of magnitude apart.

Randomness does not guarantee uniform distribution. In two consecutive throws of a dice, getting the number 4 on both throws is still random. Winning the lottery big prize twice or more in one lifetime has been done before.

If you need a more unique distribution per thread, I have included sample of RandomProvider from Jon Skeet's most excellent book (yes, I am a fanboy).

UPDATE

A small rewrite for parallel execution, because it is fun to torture silicon based life forms:

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {

        ConcurrentDictionary<int, int> resultDictionary = new ConcurrentDictionary<int, int>();
        Parallel.For(0, 1000, x =>
        {
            var r = RandomProvider.GetThreadRandom();
            ConcurrentDictionary<string, int> dictionary = new ConcurrentDictionary<string, int>();
                while (true)
                {
                    int rand = r.Next(0, 1073741823);
                    CrockfordBase32Encoding encoding = new CrockfordBase32Encoding();
                    string encodedRand = encoding.Encode((ulong) rand, false);
                    if (!dictionary.TryAdd(encodedRand, rand)) break;
                }
            Console.WriteLine("{0} - {1}", x, dictionary.Count);
            resultDictionary.TryAdd(x, dictionary.Count);
        });

        Console.WriteLine();
        Console.WriteLine("Average Number Before Duplicate: " + resultDictionary.Average(x => x.Value));
        Console.WriteLine("Minimum Number Before Duplicate: " + resultDictionary.Min(x => x.Value));
        Console.WriteLine("Maximum Number Before Duplicate: " + resultDictionary.Max(x => x.Value));
        Console.WriteLine(" Median Number Before Duplicate: " + resultDictionary.Select(x=>x.Value).Median());
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

and the results:

Average Number Before Duplicate: 41826.375
Minimum Number Before Duplicate: 1655
Maximum Number Before Duplicate: 134671
 Median Number Before Duplicate: 39119

UPDATE 2

So the author of the CodeProject article has published his work as a NuGet package:

Install-Package Troschuetz.Random

I've used the same sample code to test different generators:

StandardGenerator

Average Number Before Duplicate: 40434.148
Minimum Number Before Duplicate: 978
Maximum Number Before Duplicate: 136248
 Median Number Before Duplicate: 38845

ALFGenerator

Average Number Before Duplicate: 40395.845
Minimum Number Before Duplicate: 828
Maximum Number Before Duplicate: 125705
 Median Number Before Duplicate: 38042

MT19937Generator

Average Number Before Duplicate: 40478.174
Minimum Number Before Duplicate: 2723
Maximum Number Before Duplicate: 121367
 Median Number Before Duplicate: 38279

XorShift128Generator

Average Number Before Duplicate: 41463.732
Minimum Number Before Duplicate: 878
Maximum Number Before Duplicate: 111206
 Median Number Before Duplicate: 39013.5

So, there you have it. Enjoy for what it is worth to ya ..

share|improve this answer
2  
There is in fact a bug in the built-in Random class, where it can have a shorter periodicity than was originally expected based on the algorithm being used. This is not the cause of the OP's issue, but is interesting information, nonetheless. –  Dan Bryant Jul 21 at 21:46
    
This is not an answer, right? –  justhalf Jul 22 at 10:09
    
@Sayse what, an answer that has a link shouldn't be an answer, because the linked site may go offline sometime in the future? You're being silly. –  Mr Lister Jul 22 at 11:21
    
@sayse and justhalf ... I hope you like the extended answer better .. –  Darek Jul 22 at 13:25
1  
@Darek "look at the min and max, two orders of magnitude apart" - I would expect your min and max to approach 2 and 1073741823 with more trials. –  D Stanley Jul 22 at 13:32

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