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I'm attempting to import a .csv file into my IPython notebook using the following:

import csv
datafile_dC = open('/Users/iMacHome/dual-Core.csv', 'r')
datareader_dC = csv.reader(datafile_dC)
data_dC = []
for row in datareader_dC:
data_dC.append(row)

data_dC = np.array(data_dC)
print data_dC

x = data_dC[:, 6]
y = data_dC[:, 7]

Printing the data yields (shorthand):

[['1.29940' '-0.06908' '0.85295' ..., '-0.83824' '-0.11374' '0.11374']
 ['0.93471' '0.10030' '1.25981' ..., '-1.47697' '0.02932' '-0.02932']
 ['0.57901' '0.25031' '1.77954' ..., '-1.28751' '0.23731' '-0.23731']
 ..., 
 ['1.26506' '-0.21818' '0.60509' ..., '-1.15941' '-0.10211' '0.10211']
 ['1.22592' '-0.39114' '0.40631' ..., '-1.71412' '-0.08846' '0.08846']
 ['2.13359' '-0.51551' '0.30513' ..., '-2.07729' '-0.32911' '0.32911']]

However, using this method* seems to yield the following error:

TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for *: 'float' and 'numpy.ndarray'

when calling the following:

def myBoundary(x, y0=-2.163, slope=-1.7):
    return (slope * x) + y0

y_boundary = myBoundary(x, y0=-2.163, slope=-1.7)

I know this is quite trivial but if anyone could suggest a way of solving this problem I would be very grateful.

N.B. *Manually entering the data as a list of lists doesn't yield the same error.

share|improve this question
2  
You should cast your data to float numbers and actually convert the list of lists to a numpy list. –  David Zwicker Jul 21 '14 at 21:32
    
How do I go about doing this? –  Michael Roberts Jul 21 '14 at 21:49
3  

1 Answer 1

Try this:

def myBoundary(x, y0=-2.163, slope=-1.7):
    x = np.array([float(x0) for x0 in x])
    return (slope * x) + y0

Your data was a list of string

share|improve this answer
1  
This is closer. However, I now only have two data points on the graph... –  Michael Roberts Jul 21 '14 at 23:30
1  
The length of y_boundary is the same as the number of rows in data_dC (which is also the length of x). Do you mean for you the length is only 2? –  seb Jul 21 '14 at 23:39
    
It seems that way yes, I have two data points: one below the demarcation line and one above...? –  Michael Roberts Jul 21 '14 at 23:47
2  
What if you print x, before the call to myBoundary? What is the length of x? –  seb Jul 21 '14 at 23:52
1  
Using print len(x) I get the result 257, so the length is not 2... –  Michael Roberts Jul 21 '14 at 23:53

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