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I have the following expression that does some entity(entityframework) to business object mapping

internal static Expression<Func<CardholderEntity, Cardholder>> ExpressionMap = entity => new Cardholder
{
    Id = entity.Id,
    CardholderNo = entity.CardholderNo,
};

However, when I create another lambda expression like this with different parameters:

internal static Expression<Func<AnotherCardholderEntity, Cardholder>> ExpressionMap = entity => new Cardholder
{
    Id = entity.AnotherId,
    CardholderNo = entity.AnotherCardholderNo,
};

I get a red underline under ExpressionMap saying member with same name already declared

Is it possible, or are there any work arounds to this?

Assuming I have hundreds of expression mappings of different entities to business objects, I wouldn't want to have to come up with that many different names for each of them

share|improve this question
1  
No, it is not. This is because lambda calls are not dispatched like methods; the lambda (or expression) is a single value. – user2864740 Jul 22 '14 at 1:54
    
Ah, I see, ok thanks for that. – Null Reference Jul 22 '14 at 1:55
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I don't think this has anything to do with lambdas. What you're doing is essentially the equivalent of:

internal static int x = 5;
internal static string x = "five";

Which obviously wouldn't work.

You could even get rid of the lambdas and it would still not work:

internal static Expression<Func<CardholderEntity, Cardholder>> ExpressionMap = null;
internal static Expression<Func<AnotherCardholderEntity, Cardholder>> ExpressionMap = null;

The solution kind of depends on the architecture of your application and what your goals are. But one option would be to keep a dictionary of them based on the type. Not sure if that will work for you, though.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, no wonder, thanks for explaining – Null Reference Jul 22 '14 at 1:56

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