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I'm learning iterator concepts in C# and was experimenting codes, taking simple issue and trying to implement in different ways. I'm trying to display all the terms in a list, for that I'm trying different ways to obtain the results. In the below code, I'm using two classes ListIterator and ImplementList.

In the ListIterator class : I defined a HashSet and it uses IEnumerator to store the values. Here GetEnumerator() method returns the values in the list. GetEnumerator is implemented in the ImplementList class (other class). Finally, the list is displayed in the console.

public class ListIterator
{ 
   public void DisplayList()
   {
    HashSet<int> myhashSet = new HashSet<int> { 30, 4, 27, 35, 96, 34};
    IEnumerator<int> IE = myhashSet.GetEnumerator();
    while (IE.MoveNext())
      {
        int x = IE.Current;
        Console.Write("{0} ", x);
      }
      Console.WriteLine();
    Console.ReadKey();
   }
}

In the ImplementList class : GetEnumerator() is defined and it returns the list using yield return x.

public class ImplementList : IList<int>
  {
    private List<int> Mylist = new List<int>();
    public ImplementList() { }

    public void Add(int item) 
    { 
        Mylist.Add(item); 
    }

    public IEnumerator<int> GetEnumerator()
    {
      foreach (int x in Mylist)
        yield return x;
    }
  }

Now, I want to rewrite the GetEnumerator() without using yield return. And it should return all the values in a list. Is it possible to get all the values in the list without using yield return in IEnumerator

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can use the Enumerator implementation of you inner list MyList:

    public IEnumerator<int> GetEnumerator()
    {
      return MyList.GetEnumerator();
    }

Or you can implement an IEnumerator yourself (from MSDN):

public class People : IEnumerable
{
    private Person[] _people;
    public People(Person[] pArray)
    {
        _people = new Person[pArray.Length];

        for (int i = 0; i < pArray.Length; i++)
        {
            _people[i] = pArray[i];
        }
    }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
       return (IEnumerator) GetEnumerator();
    }

    public PeopleEnum GetEnumerator()
    {
        return new PeopleEnum(_people);
    }
}

public class PeopleEnum : IEnumerator
{
    public Person[] _people;

    // Enumerators are positioned before the first element 
    // until the first MoveNext() call. 
    int position = -1;

    public PeopleEnum(Person[] list)
    {
        _people = list;
    }

    public bool MoveNext()
    {
        position++;
        return (position < _people.Length);
    }

    public void Reset()
    {
        position = -1;
    }

    object IEnumerator.Current
    {
        get
        {
            return Current;
        }
    }

    public Person Current
    {
        get
        {
            try
            {
                return _people[position];
            }
            catch (IndexOutOfRangeException)
            {
                throw new InvalidOperationException();
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I implemented an IEnumerator, How do use that in my GetEnumerator() –  Giri Jul 22 '14 at 21:42
    
In my case I coded for a list, I couldn't trace how to use it in GetEnumerator() method.. @Liviu M. –  Giri Jul 22 '14 at 22:03
    
You just return new YourEnumerator(yourInternalList); –  Liviu M. Jul 23 '14 at 3:36
    
Please take a look into my Enumerator1 code link @Liviu M. –  Giri Jul 23 '14 at 4:16
1  
It is not necessary to define a new enumerator inside your own enumerator. If you use the inner's list enumerator you can just use the pattern in my first section of the answer. If you implement your own, just use the pattern in the second sample, without having a new inner list of ints in the enumerator because you pass the list from the outside to the enumerator –  Liviu M. Jul 23 '14 at 6:29

This would return results as an array

return MyList.ToArray();

or if you want to return it as a List, why not just

return MyList;
share|improve this answer
    
it says cannot explicitly convert type List to IEnumerator –  Giri Jul 22 '14 at 5:34
    
Why do you want to implement a List in a class, when it is already implemented by the List itself? –  Jaska Jul 22 '14 at 5:36
    
I'm just experimenting with yield return. I want GetEnumerator to display all the values in a list without using yield return –  Giri Jul 22 '14 at 5:42
    
Yep, now that I read your question another time, I see you say you are just experimenting :) return MyList.GetEnumerator(); –  Jaska Jul 22 '14 at 5:44
1  
var a = new MyList().GetEnumerator(); while (a.MoveNext()) { Console.WriteLine(a.Current); } –  Jaska Jul 22 '14 at 6:10

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