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Returning reference to a local variable

I happened to find this code return 5. It's OK to write it this way or should definitely be avoid?

   int& f() {

     int i = 5; 
     return i;
}

int main(){

    cout<<f()<<endl;    
}
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marked as duplicate by cHao, Celada, Ja͢ck, unkulunkulu, edorian Aug 31 '12 at 14:39

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Effectively a duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/1755010/… and related to this posters earlier questions here stackoverflow.com/questions/2474852/… . –  dmckee Mar 21 '10 at 19:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

If it works, it works only by accident. This is undefined behavior and should definitely be avoided.

The moment that f returns, there are no longer any guarantees as to what happens to the memory where i lived and what happens when you try to access it.

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2  
Agreed. +1. You might also want to look at this: stackoverflow.com/questions/1755010 –  sbi Mar 21 '10 at 19:14

The compiler warning is correct — you can't do that. i is likely to be overwritten at some unexpected time.

Either do

int f() { // don't return reference

     int i = 5; 
     return i;
}

int main(){

    cout<<f()<<endl;    
}

or

int &f( int &i ) { // accept reference
  // actually, in the case of modify-and-return like this,
  // you should call by value and return by value without
  // using any references. This is for illustration.

     i = 5; 
     return i;
}

int main(){
    int i
    cout<<f(i)<<endl;    
}
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1  
If you're modifying a by-reference parameter in place, returning the reference as well seems strange (second example). I'm not saying it's wrong, of course. –  Steve314 Mar 21 '10 at 19:14
    
@Steve: Sometimes it's the thing to do. Given the example, it would appear that he wants a reference and a return value. shrug In the particular case of an int, using references is basically incorrect. –  Potatoswatter Mar 21 '10 at 19:19
1  
@Steve: It's exactly what happens when you overload operator<< for your own types. You take an ostream& and return the same ostream&. –  FredOverflow Mar 21 '10 at 23:48
    
@FredOverflow - and just look at how many people really hate the stream operators. I'm not one of them, by the way, but you have to admit - they are definitely a special case in more than one way. For example, they also give a completely new meaning to old operators - not something to recommend as an everyday practice. –  Steve314 Mar 22 '10 at 0:03

When the function 'f()' returns, the stack contents will be popped, and the memory address to the variable 'i' will no longer be valid. This code should not be used.

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