Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Im pretty new with the iOS UI Automation. I want to pass or fail a test depending on if an alert is shown or not. So, so far it looks something like:

#import "onAlert.js"
function run_testLogin(target) {
    UIALogger.logStart("Test-Login");
    var window = target.frontMostApp().mainWindow();
    window .scrollViews()[0].buttons()["Log in"].tap();
    app.alert();
}

So now I want to "UIALogger.logPass("Login successfully");" or UIALogger.logFail("Login failed");" depending on if an alert has been shown or not. How can I achieve that?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

Try using an alert handler looking something like this

        UIATarget.onAlert = function onAlert(alert){
            var title = alert.name();

            if (title == "some alert title"){
                UIALogger.logFail("Login failed");
                return true;
            }
            UIALogger.logPass("Login successfully");
            return false;
        }

You can get the alert's name (as shown above), and then fail/pass it in there.

You should insert the handler right after the login button is tapped

share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't it be better to insert it before? There is a race-case if you insert the handler after the button is tapped. –  Braains Jul 22 '14 at 15:41
1  
Before would also be good. I suppose it would be better to put it before just to be a 150% sure it will be called –  user3253063 Jul 23 '14 at 6:13
    
Both answer are correct, the problem is that I have the onAlert function on a separate file that I import for other test cases (with other alerts not login-related), so "passing" or "failing" the login testcase with that approach might mix up with other testcases –  santidoo Jul 23 '14 at 7:51

Try something like this would be to use an alert handler like the other answer shows, but to handle the alert differently. Try something like:

UIATarget.onAlert = function onAlert(alert)
{
    var title = alert.name();
    if (title == "Alert name you're looking for")
    {
        UIALogger.logPass("Test successful");
    } else if (title == "Alert name that means login was unsuccessful")
    {
        UIALogger.logFail("Test failed");
    } else
    {
        // The alert is from something else and may not be a failure
        UIALogger.logIssue("Unexpected alert");
    }
}

Now depending on what alerts are will change what you want to do with the alerts that show up. If you are okay with the default button being pressed automatically then return false. Otherwise implement your own button presses (UIATarget.localTarget().frontMostApp().alert().buttons()) and return true.

This should come earlier in the code than the action that will trigger the alert.

EDIT: If you are worried about conflicting alert titles then you can try something like this:

this.alertHandler = 
{
    alerts: 
    {
        defaultCase: function(alert)
        {   
            var baseScreen = new BaseScreen();
            baseScreen.app().alert().defaultButton().tap();
            return true;
        }
    },
    pushAlert: function(title, func)
    {
        dev.alertHandler.alerts[title]=func;
    },
    popAlert: function(title)
    {
        delete dev.alertHandler.alerts[title];
    }   
};

And then your onAlert would look something like:

UIATarget.onAlert = function(alert)
{
    if(alert.name() in Device.alertHandler.alerts)
    {
        return Device.alertHandler.alerts[alert.name()](alert);
    } else
    {
        return Device.alertHandler.alerts.defaultCase(alert);
    }
};

You may need to instead use arrays so that the pushing and popping is semantically correct but I have not found a case where I need more than a single alert handler for an alert and so I didn't bother programming the extra functionality in.

share|improve this answer
    
The alert title when login fails is too generic ("Error"), so it might appears in other testcases not related with the login. So I would rather logPass or logFail the test within the Login.js, not in the onAlert.js. Other solution would be do not import the onAlert.js and implement it within the login.js –  santidoo Jul 23 '14 at 8:00

So finally I ended up checking if the login button is still displayed after tapping on it or not. So that my function looks like that:

#import "onAlert.js"
function run_testLogin(target) {

    UIALogger.logStart("Test-Login");
    var window = target.frontMostApp().mainWindow();
    var loginButton = window .scrollViews()[0].buttons()["Log in"];

    loginButton.tap();

    app.alert();
    target.delay(1);

    if (loginButton.isVisible())
        UIALogger.logFail("Login failed");
    else
        UIALogger.logPass("Login successfully");
}

My only concern now is if the login process takes too long..

share|improve this answer
    
You can also create an onAlert handler. My tests have a similar scenario to yours and what I did was create an Object that would hold various alerts that could be both pushed and popped. I'll throw my code into my answer for you in case it is something that you would want. –  Braains Jul 23 '14 at 13:46
    
Cool, thanks a lot. It will be pretty useful –  santidoo Jul 25 '14 at 8:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.