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I have written this code sample:

val fact: PartialFunction[Int, Int] = {
  case 0 => 1
  case n if n > 0 => n * fact(n-1)
}

And it fails to compile with an error: forward reference extends over definition of value fact.

So my question is whether a partial function can be recursive? May be there is another syntax for that?

EDIT

This error seems to appear only when trying this in Scala Worksheet.

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marked as duplicate by sschaef Jul 22 '14 at 17:47

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
I just tested this in the repl... works fine –  Electric Coffee Jul 22 '14 at 15:46
    
Yeah your code works just fine in the REPL - Scala 2.11.1 –  vptheron Jul 22 '14 at 15:52
    
@ElectricCoffee Indeed, but in scala worksheet it doesn't. Btw. there was an answer suggesting makeing the defenition lazy, and it works, but it was deleted. –  Ilya I Jul 22 '14 at 15:53
    
What version of scala are you using in the worksheet? –  Gabriele Petronella Jul 22 '14 at 16:01
    
@GabrielePetronella 2.10.4 –  Ilya I Jul 22 '14 at 16:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The code works fine in the REPL, both in version 2.10.4 and 2.11.1, so I'm afraid it's a bug in the worksheet.

I can also reproduce the problem in scalafiddle, but I didn't find any information about what compiler are they using.

The quick workaround for the bug is to declare fact as lazy val or def

lazy val fact: PartialFunction[Int, Int] = {
  case 0 => 1
  case n if n > 0 => n * fact(n-1)
}

or

def fact: PartialFunction[Int, Int] = {
  case 0 => 1
  case n if n > 0 => n * fact(n-1)
}
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