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Hi know this question may sound dumb, but I found nothing about the method naming conventions about plural form. For example I have:

public User getUser(idUser);
public List<User> getUsers();

my colleague said that it don't follow java naming conventions, and it should be:

public User getUser(idUser);
public List<User> getUser();

I'm concerned about it, but I can't find any document explaing if I should use:

public List<User> getUser();
public List<User> getUsers();
public List<User> getUserList();
public List<User> getUsersList();
...

Please understand I'm not asking for an opinion or searching a debate (I already had it, live), but for a document telling the guidelines.

Thank you.

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10  
your colleague is wrong –  Amir Afghani Jul 22 '14 at 15:35
1  
I always like to use the get<ObjectName>List() name convention for list getters - in your example that would be getUserList(). This also works fine, if the plural of your objects is not just built by appending an s character (which is especially the case in some non-english languages). However, I would definitely not use getUser() for a getter that returns a list of users. –  Jack Jul 22 '14 at 15:39
7  
If i saw getUser() and it returned a List my eyebrows would raise. When ones eyebrows wiggle when looking at a method signature you have problems. –  ug_ Jul 22 '14 at 15:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

List<User> getUsers() looks perfectly good to me. You're getting users. That's pretty intuitive.

However I wouldn't normally use List<User> getUserList(). That's embedding the collection type (List) into the name, and if you want to return a Set or a Collection in the future then that's going to be confusing.

For naming conventions I would normally defer to the Java Bean property conventions (see this question/answer for more info). A lot of frameworks will expect this convention and introspect using it, so by following it you're likely to place nicely with such frameworks in the future if you choose to adopt one.

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1  
Yes, boo for the hungarian notation. –  Henning Jul 22 '14 at 15:50
1  
@Henning the original hungarian notation has nothing to do with data types but the nature of data. Future propagations poorly turned it to reflect data types which is obviously bad. –  khachik Jul 22 '14 at 16:02
    
Often if you're stating the data structure type in the name, it should begin with a "to". As in String#toCharArray or Object#toString. Of course this only works if the result object really represents the object it was called on –  Cruncher Jul 22 '14 at 16:03
    
if you want to return a Set or a Collection in the future then that's going to be confusing. I'm not sure this is a valid point. If you're going to change the return type in the future, it's not much more skin off of anyone's back to change the name as well. –  Cruncher Jul 22 '14 at 16:06
    
@Cruncher - if someone remembers to refactor both then maybe. If this method forms part of a public API then you have a bigger problem (leaving aside the return type change) –  Brian Agnew Jul 22 '14 at 16:25

I think your colleague is wrong in most cases and you should use the plural form if you are returning an array. The default Java methods seem to also use this convention:

Example:

String s = "Hello world";
s.getBytes();

This is a built in method and getBytes() is plural. This method is not returning one byte, it is returning an array of bytes (there are many bytes being returned). Thus the name, getBytes() I think it would also be ok to use getByteArray() but this is worse because if you decide you want to return a list for example, you have to change the method name

I think it depends on how you want to name your method. You can name it getUsers if you are returning a list of users, or you could name it getUserList. In both cases it works because you are returning multiple users, or one user list, although if you are returning a list of users I don't think you would ever use getUser or getUserLists (unless its a list of lists)

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Looking at java.util.Map, you can find examples of both :

To get a Collection of the values of a map, you call map.values ().

But to get a Set of the keys of the map, you call map.keySet ().

In the case of a method returning List<User>, I'd use either getUsers () or getUserList () (or without the get - users () or userList ()).

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1  
Isn't that because you are returning multiple values in the first one, but only one set in the second one? –  Zach Jul 22 '14 at 15:43
    
Frankly, the map.keySet() method does not return a list of keysets - just one keySet -> thus the name of the method. –  Jack Jul 22 '14 at 15:43
    
@Zach You can also say you are returning one Collection in the first case, or multiple keys in the second case. –  Eran Jul 22 '14 at 15:44
    
@Eran true, it all depends I think on whether you want to name the method after what type you are returning or what the type you are returning contains (if its multiple things) –  Zach Jul 22 '14 at 15:45

In java, you could not have the same method name with only different return types. So your friends' suggestion would not work in that case. Does this help? However, there is confusion in the javadocs: from class.getMethods javadoc confused me:docs.oracle.com/javase/8/docs/api/java/lang/… If this Class object represents a type that has multiple public methods with the same name and parameter types, but different return types, then the returned array has a Method object for each such method.

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Wonder why this was down voted? The inference is that plurals is the way to go. –  Khanna111 Jul 22 '14 at 15:46
1  
I think it's downvoted, because you still cannot have same method name with only different return type. –  Alexander Pogrebnyak Jul 22 '14 at 16:02
    
Thanks for the explanation. That is what i thought as well but the following from class.getMethods javadoc confused me:docs.oracle.com/javase/8/docs/api/java/lang/… If this Class object represents a type that has multiple public methods with the same name and parameter types, but different return types, then the returned array has a Method object for each such method. –  Khanna111 Jul 22 '14 at 16:29
    
In any case, I DO NOT support drive by downvotes without the explanation. –  Alexander Pogrebnyak Jul 22 '14 at 21:57

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