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If I have a Base and a Derived Class:

class Base {
  //...
};

class Derived : public Base {
  //...
};

Is it possible to overload functions in the following way?

void DoSomething(Base b) {
    cout << "Do Something to Base" << endl;
}

void DoSomething(Derived d) {
    cout << "Do Something to Derived" << endl;
}


What happens if I do this:

int main() {
    Derived d = Derived();
    DoSomething(d);
}

Derived is also a Base.. so which version gets called?

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The best match of the functions will be called, in your case it should be void DoSomething(Derived d). But you also should ask yourself this: Can you do it another way? For example with virtual function in the class hierarchy? –  Joachim Pileborg Jul 22 '14 at 17:55
    
@user2436815 'fu' Did you mean you're suffering from it? C'mon: That's so easy to check :P ... –  πάντα ῥεῖ Jul 22 '14 at 18:06
    
@πάνταῥεῖ 'fu' meant "flying unicorn". Sorry for confusion –  user2436815 Jul 22 '14 at 18:22
1  
@user2436815 Ouch! No wonder this comment was deleted (could have been interpreted otherwise rude anyway). Anyways, you should clarify what you're actually asking about. What you have posted as question is really trivially solvable, as my link shows. –  πάντα ῥεῖ Jul 22 '14 at 18:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The derived function will be called and used because it matches this "DoSomething(Derived d)" signature.

Have you consider using the code like this instead:

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;
class Base {
public:
    virtual void DoSomething();
};

class Derived : public Base {
public:
    void DoSomething() override;
};
void Base:: DoSomething() {
    cout << "Do Something to Base" << endl;
}

void Derived :: DoSomething() {
    cout << "Do Something to Derived" << endl;
}
int main() {
    Base *d = new Derived();
    d->DoSomething();
    delete d;
    return 0;
}

It accomplished the same task, and allows you to take advantage of polymorphisms strength.

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'... of polymorphisms strength' yes, and all of the fiddle with hierarchical class designs, that comes afterwards :P ... –  πάντα ῥεῖ Jul 22 '14 at 18:15
    
As with any tool, it has it own set of advantages and disadvantages. But yes, hierarchical class designs can be trying. –  Anthony T Jul 22 '14 at 18:26

Yes, C++ lets you overload functions for base and derived classes. In fact, this mechanism is used by the standard library <algorithm> functions to select the correct algorithm depending on the types of the iterators passed in.

A Derived object is also a Base, but DoSomething(Derived) is an exact match, so it's preferred. DoSomething(d) will call DoSomething(Derived).

However, note that you can't get polymorphic behaviour this way. That is, if you have a Base& that actually refers to a Derived object, it still calls DoSomething(Base): that is, it dispatches on the static type. (In fact, since you are passing by value, it copies out only the Base part of the object into the parameter.) To get polymorphic behaviour, you would have to make DoSomething into a virtual member function (or make DoSomething(Base& b) call a virtual member function on b.)

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