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I am currently modifying the Xilinx Device Config Driver (xdevcfg, or devcfg on some systems) for use with the device tree overlay system posted on the Linux kernel mailing list back in May. As part of this, I need to access a section of memory immediately after the driver finishes programming the FPGA. This section of memory corresponds to a ROM that I have created in the Zynq FPGA on a ZC702 board.

Unfortunately, any access to this area of memory using the ioread or iowrite functions causes the system to hang. I have requested the memory region using request_mem_region and remapped it using ioremap. Here is the code in question (as a diff—for the full code, see this Pastebin):

diff --git a/drivers/char/xilinx_devcfg.c b/drivers/char/xilinx_devcfg.c
index dcf4987..1aa59bd 100644
--- a/drivers/char/xilinx_devcfg.c
+++ b/drivers/char/xilinx_devcfg.c
@@ -27,6 +27,7 @@
 #include <linux/sysctl.h>
 #include <linux/types.h>
 #include <linux/uaccess.h>
+#include <linux/delay.h>

 extern void zynq_slcr_init_preload_fpga(void);
 extern void zynq_slcr_init_postload_fpga(void);
@@ -249,6 +250,11 @@ xdevcfg_write(struct file *file, const char __user *buf, size_t count,
    struct xdevcfg_drvdata *drvdata = file->private_data;
    size_t user_count = count;
    int i;
+   int error;
+   u8 data;
+   u8 offset;
+   struct resource *region;
+   void __iomem *rom;

    status = clk_enable(drvdata->clk);
    if (status)
@@ -369,6 +375,63 @@ xdevcfg_write(struct file *file, const char __user *buf, size_t count,
        goto error;
    }

+   /* Binfiles for the Zynq are always the same size, so this works in
+    * prototyping */
+   if (*ppos + user_count == 4045564) {
+       // Wait for FPGA programming to be done
+       while (!(xdevcfg_readreg(drvdata->base_address +
+               XDCFG_INT_STS_OFFSET) &
+               XDCFG_IXR_PCFG_DONE_MASK)) {
+           msleep(50);
+           printk(".");
+       }
+
+       region = request_mem_region(0x7fff0000, 0x10000,
+           "xilinx_xdevcfg");
+       if (region == NULL) {
+           printk("!! Region request failed\n");
+           return -EBUSY;
+       }
+       printk("Region received\n");
+
+       rom = ioremap(0x7fff0000, 0x10000);
+       if (rom == NULL) {
+           printk("!! Remap failed\n");
+           return -EIO;
+       }
+       printk("Memory remapped\n");
+
+       // Overlay-specific stuff
+       error = of_overlay_destroy_all();
+       if (error) {
+           printk("!! Destroy failed\n");
+           status = -ENODEV;
+           goto error;
+       }
+       printk("Overlays destroyed\n");
+
+       printk("ROM address: %p\n", rom);
+       offset = ioread8((u8 *)rom);
+       printk("Data: %d\n", offset);
+
+       /*data = ioread8((u8 *)rom + offset);
+       printk("DATA: %d\n", data);*/
+
+       if (data == 0xd00dfeed) {
+           // Do the actual work with overlays here
+           // of_overlay_create((struct device_node *)io);
+       } else {
+           // Device trees always start with 0xd00dfeed
+           printk("BAD MAGIC\n");
+       }
+       printk("READ DONE\n");
+
+       /*iounmap(rom);
+       printk("UNMAPPED\n");
+       release_mem_region(0x7fff0000, 0x10000);
+       printk("REGION RELEASED\n");*/
+   }
+
    *ppos += user_count;
    status = user_count;

The kernel and this code compile without error. When I try to cat a binfile to the driver, I see the following output:

zynq> cat /tmp/dt/vhdl/zc702.bin > /dev/xdevcfg
Region received
Memory remapped
Overlays destroyed
ROM address: f00c6000

The address f00c6000 suggests that ioremap is working correctly and translating the physical address to the driver's virtual address space. I have also used similar code to create a working character driver for the ROM driver and have seen from some print statements that its void __iomem *rom virtual address is also near f00c6000 (in case that's relevant). Here is the ROM driver code:

#include <linux/module.h>
#include <linux/version.h>
#include <linux/kernel.h>
#include <linux/types.h>
#include <linux/kdev_t.h>
#include <linux/fs.h>
#include <linux/device.h>
#include <linux/cdev.h>
#include <linux/uaccess.h>
#include <linux/io.h>

/* Static ROM address until the FPGA ROM works */
#define ROM_BASE 0x7fff0000
#define ROM_SIZE 0x00010000

static void __iomem *rom;
static dev_t first;
static struct cdev c_dev;
static struct class *cl;

static ssize_t rom_read(struct file *f, char __user *buf, size_t len, loff_t *off)
{
    int i;
    u8 byte;

    if (*off >= ROM_SIZE)
    {
        return 0;
    }
    if (*off + len > ROM_SIZE)
    {
        len = ROM_SIZE - *off;
    }
    for (i = 0; i < len; i++)
    {
        byte = ioread8((u8 *)rom + *off + i);
        if (copy_to_user(buf + i, &byte, 1) != 0)
        {
            return -EFAULT;
        }
    }
    *off += len;

    return len;
}

/*
 * Allow writes because initializing the ROM in Vivado requires rebuilding the project
 * project once for each different device tree. So yes, it's really a RAM.
 */
static ssize_t rom_write(struct file *f, const char __user *buf, size_t len, loff_t *off)
{
    int i;
    u8 byte;

    if (*off >= ROM_SIZE)
    {
        return 0;
    }
    if (*off + len > ROM_SIZE)
    {
        len = ROM_SIZE - *off;
    }
    for (i = 0; i < len; i++)
    {
        if (copy_from_user(&byte, buf + i, 1))
        {
            return -EFAULT;
        }
        iowrite8(byte, (u8 *)rom + *off + i);
    }
    *off += len;

    return len;
}

/* We don't need open or release ops for a static ROM address */
static struct file_operations pugs_fops =
{
    .owner = THIS_MODULE,
    .open = NULL,
    .release = NULL,
    .read = rom_read,
    .write = rom_write
};

static int __init rom_init(void)
{
    // No request_mem_region because LDD3 doesn't suggest it
    if ((rom = ioremap(ROM_BASE, ROM_SIZE)) == NULL)
    {
        printk(KERN_ERR "Mapping ROM failed\n");
        return -1;
    }
    printk(KERN_INFO "ROM registered\n");
    if (alloc_chrdev_region(&first, 0, 3, "rom") < 0)
    {
        return -1;
    }
    printk(KERN_INFO "Major Minor: %d %d\n", MAJOR(first), MINOR(first));
    if ((cl = class_create(THIS_MODULE, "chardrv")) == NULL)
    {
        unregister_chrdev_region(first, 1);
        return -1;
    }
    if (device_create(cl, NULL, first, NULL, "rom") == NULL)
    {
        class_destroy(cl);
        unregister_chrdev_region(first, 1);
        return -1;
    }
    cdev_init(&c_dev, &pugs_fops);
    if (cdev_add(&c_dev, first, 1) == -1)
    {
        device_destroy(cl, first);
        class_destroy(cl);
        unregister_chrdev_region(first, 1);
        return -1;
    }
    return 0;
}

static void __exit rom_exit(void)
{
    cdev_del(&c_dev);
    device_destroy(cl, first);
    class_destroy(cl);
    unregister_chrdev_region(first, 3);
    iounmap(rom);
    printk(KERN_INFO "ROM unregistered\n");
}

module_init(rom_init);
module_exit(rom_exit);

MODULE_LICENSE("GPL");
MODULE_AUTHOR("Stackoverflow Author so.author@example.com");
MODULE_DESCRIPTION("Device Tree ROM Driver, derived from LDD3 char driver");

I have verified the operation of this ROM by running dd if=/dev/urandom of=rin bs=64K count=1; cat rin > /dev/rom; cat /dev/rom > rout; cmp rin rout;.

Some troubleshooting results so far:

  • Reading and writing both cause the system to hang.
  • Order of reading and writing has no effect.
  • Changing the size of the read or write (8, 16, or 32) has no effect.
  • Reducing the size of the request_mem_region/ioremap calls to 0x1000 has no effect.
  • If the iounmap, release_mem_region, and ioread8 calls are commented out, the memory mapping from 0x7fff0000 to 0x7fffffff can be seen in /proc/iomem after the write completes.
  • I thought that perhaps the kernel wasn't happy with me trying to use ioremap during inside the file_operations write function, so I tried moving the initialization of region and rom to xdevcfg_drv_probe (the driver's platform_driver probe function). This had no effect.
  • I could use a file pointer to access my ROM driver (see this SO question), but from my reading I think this file operations are discouraged when in kernel space. Additionally, xdevcfg should not have my ROM driver as a dependency.
  • I could export the read function of my ROM driver (see the link from the previous point), but it would would sloppy and, as stated in my last point, add an unnecessary dependency.

A coworker of mine who is much more experienced with Linux kernel development is just as confused as I am, so any tips or suggestions would be a huge help. If I've forgotten to include anything that I should have, please let me know and I'll update this post.

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