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I am trying to build a C# explicit struct from a C union. The explicit struct is:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit, Pack = 1)]
public struct struct_1
{
   [FieldOffset(0)]
   [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.ByValArray, SizeConst = 1)]
   public uint[] All32;

   [FieldOffset(0)]
   [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.ByValArray, SizeConst = 1)]
   public struct_2[] bits;
}

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, Pack = 1)]
public struct struct_2
{
   [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.ByValArray, SizeConst = 4)]
   public byte[] Var56;
}

These are the structs and I am unable to access All32 which is uint after instantiation from byte array (intellisense is showing '?') as following

Type structureType = typeof(struct_1);

byte[] b = new byte[4];
b[0] = 0xA0;
b[1] = 0x01;
b[2] = 0xF0;
b[3] = 0x00;

if (structureType != null)
{
   try
   {
      GCHandle handle = GCHandle.Alloc(b, GCHandleType.Pinned);
      struct_1 intpdObj = (struct_1)Marshal.PtrToStructure(handle.AddrOfPinnedObject(), structureType);
      handle.Free();
   }
   catch
   {
   }
}
share|improve this question
    
Your empty catch block could be suppressing valuable debugging information. –  Sahuagin Jul 23 '14 at 8:06
    
I'm not having any "?" issue. However, here is what i got your first field points to the same address as your second one, and finds struct_2 instead of uint (see the "type" column of my picture) –  Olivier Jul 23 '14 at 8:13
    
Can you post the C struct declarations? –  Matthew Watson Jul 23 '14 at 8:19

3 Answers 3

OK. It is because you defined an array inside struct_2 and that is an object, so the memory address will be put inside that location when PtrToStructure creates the struct. You can try this:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit, Pack = 1)]
public struct struct_1
{
    [FieldOffset(0)]
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.ByValArray)]
    public uint[] All32;

    [FieldOffset(0)]
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.Struct)]
    public struct_2 bits;
}

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, Pack = 1)]
public struct struct_2
{
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.ByValArray, SizeConst = 4)]
    public byte[] Var56;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. But again the same issue. Unable to access All32. Looks like i have to go the way @Chris pointed out below. –  user3867643 Jul 23 '14 at 9:31
    
Strangely this works for me without a problem. Console.WriteLine(intpdObj.All32[0]); –  Alireza Jul 23 '14 at 9:35
    
Anyway, you choose the best answer :) –  Alireza Jul 23 '14 at 9:35
    
Sorry @Alireza it was working. I checked the intellisense and inferred wrongly. I printed and it was working. –  user3867643 Jul 23 '14 at 9:46
    
You're welcome :) –  Alireza Jul 23 '14 at 9:47

The MarshalAs attribute won't change how the data is represented in your .NET class/struct, it will just change the way the data is marshaled when being passed to other code. The array will still be a reference to an array, and it all turns to hell about there.

You can overlay two arrays of different types using this methods, but there are some serious gotchas involved. The biggest issue is that the number of elements will be the same for all of the arrays, but the amount of memory allocated for the arrays will be the same.

Take this union for example:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit)]
public struct ArrayUnion
{
    [FieldOffset(0)]
    public byte[] bytes;

    [FieldOffset(0)]
    public int[] ints;
}

If I create a new instance of that struct with a 100-byte array, the ints array will also claim to have a length of 100:

var u = new ArrayUnion { bytes = new byte[100] };
Console.WriteLine(u.ints.Length);

Which of course is incorrect. If I then try to access anything past the first 25 entries in the ints array I'll probably get a serious error and crash.

You can of course wrap some of this stuff into private fields and expose appropriate methods. Just be careful how you actually access the data... because if you get this wrong you will break things.

share|improve this answer
1  
Whoa, sketchy. Suddenly unsafe code doesn't seem that bad hehe ;) –  Chris Jul 23 '14 at 8:39
    
@Chris Yeah, there's unsafe code and unsafe code. This is the second type :P On the other hand it's the fastest way to convert a byte array of arbitrary length back into the ints (or doubles, or whatever) that it represents without using unsafe. It's a hack, but it does work if you're careful with it and know the risks. –  Corey Jul 23 '14 at 20:50

Why is All32 an array? What happens if you try something like this?

[StructLayout( LayoutKind.Explicit, Pack = 1 )]
public unsafe struct struct_1
{
    [FieldOffset( 0 )]
    public uint All32;

    [FieldOffset( 0 )]
    public fixed byte bits[4];
}

Edit: If you do want All32 to be an array:

[StructLayout( LayoutKind.Explicit, Pack = 1 )]
public unsafe struct struct_1
{
    [FieldOffset( 0 )]
    public fixed uint All32[1];

    [FieldOffset( 0 )]
    public fixed byte bits[4];
}
share|improve this answer
    
Because that's only valid in unsafe code? –  Corey Jul 23 '14 at 8:08
    
Well yeah, but it works..! I'd say doing unions and Marshal.PtrToStructure in C# is not very far from unsafe code territory anyway. –  Chris Jul 23 '14 at 8:17
    
Yeah, pretty close. You can do it, but it's a terrible idea most of the time. Handy for super-fast conversions in managed 'safe' code though :P –  Corey Jul 23 '14 at 8:20
    
Thanks @Chris. Looks like this is the way I have to go. None of the other attempts where working. –  user3867643 Jul 23 '14 at 9:33
    
Thanks @Corey. If there exist another way without using "unsafe", would make my job easy. –  user3867643 Jul 23 '14 at 9:34

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