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I have a simple input[type="text"] and I want to transition its width when clicking on it.

I mean I want to slide it on the left like this: demo

I don't know why this isn't working.

Here is my fiddle: demo

<input type="text" id="menu" />

This is my css.

#menu {
    width:32px;
    position:absolute;
    right:50%;
    transition: width .8s;
}

.slide {
    width:180px;
}

This is my JS.

$("#menu").click(function() {
    $(this).addClass("slide");
});
share|improve this question
1  
It might also be useful for you to use -webkit-transition as well. Doesn't fix your problem, but allows Android < 4.4 to get the animation too. Reference: caniuse.com/#feat=css-transitions – wildandjam Jul 23 '14 at 10:39
    
Thank you for your answer. @wildandjam – rexhin Jul 23 '14 at 11:35
up vote 6 down vote accepted

You dont have to use jQuery for this.

You can use :focus selector.

Just add this to your CSS

#menu:focus {
    width:180px;
}

DEMO

share|improve this answer
2  
Thank you, I like this pure CSS solution. – rexhin Jul 23 '14 at 11:35
    
Can I do this using position relative 'cause I don't want to break my layout? – rexhin Jul 23 '14 at 11:58
    
@rexhin Yes you can do it. Positioning is not affecting the :focus selector – laaposto Jul 24 '14 at 7:31
    
Yes but the problem is that it slides to the right not to the left. fiddle: jsfiddle.net/rexhin/gUS6s/32 @laaposto – rexhin Jul 24 '14 at 11:24

The problem is CSS specificity, where the id-rule has precedence over the class-rule. You can create a rule with higher precedence by combining both the id and the class values.

#menu.slide {
    width:180px;
}

Demo: Fiddle

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer. @Arun – rexhin Jul 23 '14 at 11:36

It's because of CSS specificity, change it to

#menu {
    width:32px;
    position:absolute;
    right:50%;
    transition: width .8s;
}

#menu.slide {
    width:180px;
}

FIDDLE

Styles set on an ID override the styles on the class, as ID's are more specific.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer. @adeno – rexhin Jul 23 '14 at 11:37

jsFiddle

A CSS ID selector is more specific than a class selector, unless you include !important in the rule.

.slide {
    width:180px !important;
}

!important will override all other CSS rules. As noted in the comments, if you have a more organic way of increasing the specificity of the rule, such as using the ID #menu.slide, that is typically preferred to using !important, since this can create undesired clashes with other stylesheets. However, that particular example will only work if you're only using this solution for a single text-box.

Also, you need to wrap jQuery code that relies on DOM elements in a DOM-ready handler:

$(function () {
    $("#menu").click(function () {
        $(this).addClass("slide");
    });
});
share|improve this answer
3  
Don't use !important – JqueryKing Jul 23 '14 at 10:30
2  
@Sudharsan - don't be daft. !important is a tool like any other. Of course you can use it. You just shouldn't abuse it. – Chris Spittles Jul 23 '14 at 10:32
1  
Some of its drawbacks include: Encourages sloppy, poorly thought-out code Creates code that is less maintainable Overrides styles declared in user style sheets, thus degrading accessibility – JqueryKing Jul 23 '14 at 10:35
1  
@Sudharsan And some of the drawbacks of #menu.slide are that it won't work if the OP requires this solution to be extensible for use with other elements. Without full knowledge of the markup either option may not be a perfect solution, but this is a valid option given current information. I will update the answer to note your concerns however. – nbrooks Jul 23 '14 at 10:37
    
Thank you all for your answers. – rexhin Jul 23 '14 at 11:37

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