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I'm trying to convert some strings that are in French Canadian and basically, I'd like to be able to take out the French accent marks in the letters while keeping the letter. (E.g. convert é to e, so crème brûlée would become creme brulee)

What is the best method for achieving this?

share|improve this question
5  
A warning: This approach might work in some specific cases, but in general you cannot just remove diacritical marks. In some cases and some languages this might change the meaning of the text. You don't say why you want to do this; if it is for the sake of comparing strings or searching you are most probably better off by using a unicode-aware library for this. – JacquesB Oct 30 '08 at 10:48
    
@JacquesB Apologies - I now realize you were (legitimately) questioning the OP (as opposed to commenting on an answer). Damn, where's the undo, sorry! at-BrunoLM - that question is a dup, can this link be removed? at-JamesHall - your deleted answer to self should become a comment or an edit – Ruben Bartelink May 15 '13 at 20:23
1  
Since most of the techniques to achieve this rely on Unicode normalization, this document describing the standard may be useful to read: unicode.org/reports/tr15 – LuddyPants Dec 16 '13 at 23:50

13 Answers 13

up vote 295 down vote accepted

I've not used this method, but Michael Kaplan describes a method for doing so in his blog post (with a confusing title) that talks about stripping diacritics: Stripping is an interesting job (aka On the meaning of meaningless, aka All Mn characters are non-spacing, but some are more non-spacing than others)

static string RemoveDiacritics(string text) 
{
    var normalizedString = text.Normalize(NormalizationForm.FormD);
    var stringBuilder = new StringBuilder();

    foreach (var c in normalizedString)
    {
        var unicodeCategory = CharUnicodeInfo.GetUnicodeCategory(c);
        if (unicodeCategory != UnicodeCategory.NonSpacingMark)
        {
            stringBuilder.Append(c);
        }
    }

    return stringBuilder.ToString().Normalize(NormalizationForm.FormC);
}

Note that this is a followup to his earlier post: Stripping diacritics....

The approach uses String.Normalize to split the input string into constituent glyphs (basically separating the "base" characters from the diacritics) and then scans the result and retains only the base characters. It's just a little complicated, but really you're looking at a complicated problem.

Of course, if you're limiting yourself to French, you could probably get away with the simple table-based approach in How to remove accents and tilde in a C++ std::string, as recommended by @David Dibben.

share|improve this answer
1  
@SimonTewsi one thing that immediately occurs is that it'll mean you've Hangul syllables rather than conjoining Jamo, which as well as being required for NFC also has better font support in practice. – Jon Hanna Sep 3 '12 at 19:23
13  
This is wrong. German characters ä and ö and ü get latinized as ae ue and oe, and not as a, o u ... – Stefan Steiger Nov 20 '12 at 13:41
2  
Also, Polish letter ł is ignored. – Zbigniew Wiadro Dec 12 '12 at 9:05
2  
Also Norse ø is ignored – Richard-dW Mar 25 '14 at 8:09
2  
@StefanSteiger You know, in Czech there are letters like áčěů, which we usually "latinize" to aceu, even though it sounds different and may cause confusion in words like "hrábě" /hra:bje/, "hrabě" /hrabje/, and "hrabe" /hrabe/. To me, it seems that the deletion of diacritics is a purely graphical matter, indepentent on the phonetics or history of the letter. Letters like ä ö ü got created by adding a superscript "e" to the base letters, thus the "ae" decomposition makes sense historically. It depends on the goal - to remove the graphical marks, or to decompose the letter to ASCII characters. – IllidanS4 Nov 11 '15 at 20:25

this did the trick for me...

string accentedStr;
byte[] tempBytes;
tempBytes = System.Text.Encoding.GetEncoding("ISO-8859-8").GetBytes(accentedStr);
string asciiStr = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetString(tempBytes);

quick&short!

share|improve this answer
    
why do you use ISO-8859-8 to encode the string and UTF8 to decode it? wouldn't it be better to also use ISO-8859-8 to decode the byte array? – Dominik von Weber Oct 11 '13 at 5:09
    
@DominikvonWeber this is just small "issue", but the solution is much better than the one most voted. this one at least is working for chars like ł, ą, ó etc. :) – Gutek Oct 31 '13 at 9:26
2  
This is as far the best method I've seen. – Cleiton Jan 31 '14 at 3:27
1  
I do like this solution and it works well for Windows Store Apps. However, it doesn't work for Windows Phone Apps as encoding ISO-8859-8 doesn't seem to be available. Is there another encoding that can be used instead? – Philip Colmer Jul 28 '14 at 6:58
3  
Keep in mind this replaces ß with ? goes weird on nbsp. – Ilya Kozhevnikov Oct 15 '14 at 13:50

In case someone is interested, I was looking for something similar and ended writing the following:

    public static string NormalizeStringForUrl(string name)
    {
        String normalizedString = name.Normalize(NormalizationForm.FormD);
        StringBuilder stringBuilder = new StringBuilder();

        foreach (char c in normalizedString)
        {
            switch (CharUnicodeInfo.GetUnicodeCategory(c))
            {
                case UnicodeCategory.LowercaseLetter:
                case UnicodeCategory.UppercaseLetter:
                case UnicodeCategory.DecimalDigitNumber:
                    stringBuilder.Append(c);
                    break;
                case UnicodeCategory.SpaceSeparator:
                case UnicodeCategory.ConnectorPunctuation:
                case UnicodeCategory.DashPunctuation:
                    stringBuilder.Append('_');
                    break;
            }
        }
        string result = stringBuilder.ToString();
        return String.Join("_", result.Split(new char[] { '_' }
            , StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries)); // remove duplicate underscores
    }
share|improve this answer
4  
You should preallocate the StringBuilder buffer to the name.Length to minimize memory allocation overhead. That last Split/Join call to remove sequential duplicate _ is interesting. Perhaps we should just avoid adding them in the loop. Set a flag for the previous character being an _ and not emit one if true. – IDisposable Sep 1 '09 at 21:18
    
2 really good points, I'll rewrite it if I ever get the time to go back to this portion of code :) – Luk Sep 8 '09 at 9:14

In case anyone's interested, here is the java equivalent:

import java.text.Normalizer;

public class MyClass
{
    public static String removeDiacritics(String input)
    {
        String nrml = Normalizer.normalize(input, Normalizer.Form.NFD);
        StringBuilder stripped = new StringBuilder();
        for (int i=0;i<nrml.length();++i)
        {
            if (Character.getType(nrml.charAt(i)) != Character.NON_SPACING_MARK)
            {
                stripped.append(nrml.charAt(i));
            }
        }
        return stripped.toString();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
instead of stripped += nrml.charAt(i) use a StringBuilder. you have O(n²) runtime hidden here. – Andreas Petersson Sep 9 '09 at 8:50
    
updated per above - nice catch! – KenE Sep 9 '09 at 18:17

I often use an extenstion method based on another version I found here (see Replacing characters in C# (ascii)) A quick explanation:

  • Normalizing to form D splits charactes like è to an e and a nonspacing `
  • From this, the nospacing characters are removed
  • The result is normalized back to form C (I'm not sure if this is neccesary)

Code:

using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Globalization;

// namespace here
public static class Utility
{
    public static string RemoveDiacritics(this string str)
    {
        if (str == null) return null;
        var chars =
            from c in str.Normalize(NormalizationForm.FormD).ToCharArray()
            let uc = CharUnicodeInfo.GetUnicodeCategory(c)
            where uc != UnicodeCategory.NonSpacingMark
            select c;

        var cleanStr = new string(chars.ToArray()).Normalize(NormalizationForm.FormC);

        return cleanStr;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

This works fine in java.

It basically converts all accented characters into their deAccented counterparts followed by their combining diacritics. Now you can use a regex to strip off the diacritics.

import java.text.Normalizer;
import java.util.regex.Pattern;

public String deAccent(String str) {
    String nfdNormalizedString = Normalizer.normalize(str, Normalizer.Form.NFD); 
    Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("\\p{InCombiningDiacriticalMarks}+");
    return pattern.matcher(nfdNormalizedString).replaceAll("");
}
share|improve this answer
    
Or in Java 7, "\\p{Block=CombiningDiacriticalMarks}" – Brent Foust May 19 '15 at 20:18

THIS IS THE VB VERSION (Works with GREEK) :

Imports System.Text

Imports System.Globalization

Public Function RemoveDiacritics(ByVal s As String)
    Dim normalizedString As String
    Dim stringBuilder As New StringBuilder
    normalizedString = s.Normalize(NormalizationForm.FormD)
    Dim i As Integer
    Dim c As Char
    For i = 0 To normalizedString.Length - 1
        c = normalizedString(i)
        If CharUnicodeInfo.GetUnicodeCategory(c) <> UnicodeCategory.NonSpacingMark Then
            stringBuilder.Append(c)
        End If
    Next
    Return stringBuilder.ToString()
End Function
share|improve this answer

This is how i replace diacritic characters to non-diacritic ones in all my .NET program

C#:

//Transforms the culture of a letter to its equivalent representation in the 0-127 ascii table, such as the letter 'é' is substituted by an 'e'
public string RemoveDiacritics(string s)
{
    string normalizedString = null;
    StringBuilder stringBuilder = new StringBuilder();
    normalizedString = s.Normalize(NormalizationForm.FormD);
    int i = 0;
    char c = '\0';

    for (i = 0; i <= normalizedString.Length - 1; i++)
    {
        c = normalizedString[i];
        if (CharUnicodeInfo.GetUnicodeCategory(c) != UnicodeCategory.NonSpacingMark)
        {
            stringBuilder.Append(c);
        }
    }

    return stringBuilder.ToString().ToLower();
}

VB .NET:

'Transforms the culture of a letter to its equivalent representation in the 0-127 ascii table, such as the letter "é" is substituted by an "e"'
Public Function RemoveDiacritics(ByVal s As String) As String
    Dim normalizedString As String
    Dim stringBuilder As New StringBuilder
    normalizedString = s.Normalize(NormalizationForm.FormD)
    Dim i As Integer
    Dim c As Char

    For i = 0 To normalizedString.Length - 1
        c = normalizedString(i)
        If CharUnicodeInfo.GetUnicodeCategory(c) <> UnicodeCategory.NonSpacingMark Then
            stringBuilder.Append(c)
        End If
    Next
    Return stringBuilder.ToString().ToLower()
End Function
share|improve this answer

you can use string extension from MMLib.Extensions nuget package:

using MMLib.RapidPrototyping.Generators;
public void ExtensionsExample()
{
  string target = "aácčeéií";
  Assert.AreEqual("aacceeii", target.RemoveDiacritics());
} 

Nuget page: https://www.nuget.org/packages/MMLib.Extensions/ Codeplex project site https://mmlib.codeplex.com/

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I needed something that converts all major unicode characters and the voted answer leaved a few out so I've created a version of CodeIgniter's convert_accented_characters($str) into C# that is easily customisable:

using System;
using System.Text;
using System.Collections.Generic;

public static class Strings
{
    static Dictionary<string, string> foreign_characters = new Dictionary<string, string>
    {
        { "äæǽ", "ae" },
        { "öœ", "oe" },
        { "ü", "ue" },
        { "Ä", "Ae" },
        { "Ü", "Ue" },
        { "Ö", "Oe" },
        { "ÀÁÂÃÄÅǺĀĂĄǍΑΆẢẠẦẪẨẬẰẮẴẲẶА", "A" },
        { "àáâãåǻāăąǎªαάảạầấẫẩậằắẵẳặа", "a" },
        { "Б", "B" },
        { "б", "b" },
        { "ÇĆĈĊČ", "C" },
        { "çćĉċč", "c" },
        { "Д", "D" },
        { "д", "d" },
        { "ÐĎĐΔ", "Dj" },
        { "ðďđδ", "dj" },
        { "ÈÉÊËĒĔĖĘĚΕΈẼẺẸỀẾỄỂỆЕЭ", "E" },
        { "èéêëēĕėęěέεẽẻẹềếễểệеэ", "e" },
        { "Ф", "F" },
        { "ф", "f" },
        { "ĜĞĠĢΓГҐ", "G" },
        { "ĝğġģγгґ", "g" },
        { "ĤĦ", "H" },
        { "ĥħ", "h" },
        { "ÌÍÎÏĨĪĬǏĮİΗΉΊΙΪỈỊИЫ", "I" },
        { "ìíîïĩīĭǐįıηήίιϊỉịиыї", "i" },
        { "Ĵ", "J" },
        { "ĵ", "j" },
        { "ĶΚК", "K" },
        { "ķκк", "k" },
        { "ĹĻĽĿŁΛЛ", "L" },
        { "ĺļľŀłλл", "l" },
        { "М", "M" },
        { "м", "m" },
        { "ÑŃŅŇΝН", "N" },
        { "ñńņňʼnνн", "n" },
        { "ÒÓÔÕŌŎǑŐƠØǾΟΌΩΏỎỌỒỐỖỔỘỜỚỠỞỢО", "O" },
        { "òóôõōŏǒőơøǿºοόωώỏọồốỗổộờớỡởợо", "o" },
        { "П", "P" },
        { "п", "p" },
        { "ŔŖŘΡР", "R" },
        { "ŕŗřρр", "r" },
        { "ŚŜŞȘŠΣС", "S" },
        { "śŝşșšſσςс", "s" },
        { "ȚŢŤŦτТ", "T" },
        { "țţťŧт", "t" },
        { "ÙÚÛŨŪŬŮŰŲƯǓǕǗǙǛŨỦỤỪỨỮỬỰУ", "U" },
        { "ùúûũūŭůűųưǔǖǘǚǜυύϋủụừứữửựу", "u" },
        { "ÝŸŶΥΎΫỲỸỶỴЙ", "Y" },
        { "ýÿŷỳỹỷỵй", "y" },
        { "В", "V" },
        { "в", "v" },
        { "Ŵ", "W" },
        { "ŵ", "w" },
        { "ŹŻŽΖЗ", "Z" },
        { "źżžζз", "z" },
        { "ÆǼ", "AE" },
        { "ß", "ss" },
        { "IJ", "IJ" },
        { "ij", "ij" },
        { "Œ", "OE" },
        { "ƒ", "f" },
        { "ξ", "ks" },
        { "π", "p" },
        { "β", "v" },
        { "μ", "m" },
        { "ψ", "ps" },
        { "Ё", "Yo" },
        { "ё", "yo" },
        { "Є", "Ye" },
        { "є", "ye" },
        { "Ї", "Yi" },
        { "Ж", "Zh" },
        { "ж", "zh" },
        { "Х", "Kh" },
        { "х", "kh" },
        { "Ц", "Ts" },
        { "ц", "ts" },
        { "Ч", "Ch" },
        { "ч", "ch" },
        { "Ш", "Sh" },
        { "ш", "sh" },
        { "Щ", "Shch" },
        { "щ", "shch" },
        { "ЪъЬь", "" },
        { "Ю", "Yu" },
        { "ю", "yu" },
        { "Я", "Ya" },
        { "я", "ya" },
    };

    public static char RemoveDiacritics(this char c){
        foreach(KeyValuePair<string, string> entry in foreign_characters)
        {
            if(entry.Key.IndexOf (c) != -1)
            {
                return entry.Value[0];
            }
        }
        return c;
    }

    public static string RemoveDiacritics(this string s) 
    {
        //StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder ();
        string text = "";


        foreach (char c in s)
        {
            int len = text.Length;

            foreach(KeyValuePair<string, string> entry in foreign_characters)
            {
                if(entry.Key.IndexOf (c) != -1)
                {
                    text += entry.Value;
                    break;
                }
            }

            if (len == text.Length) {
                text += c;  
            }
        }
        return text;
    }
}

Usage

// for strings
"crème brûlée".RemoveDiacritics (); // creme brulee

// for chars
"Ã"[0].RemoveDiacritics (); // A
share|improve this answer
    
Your implementation does the job, but should be improved before being used in production code. – Pierre Arnaud Apr 26 at 4:05

Try HelperSharp package.

There is a method RemoveAccents:

 public static string RemoveAccents(this string source)
 {
     //8 bit characters 
     byte[] b = Encoding.GetEncoding(1251).GetBytes(source);

     // 7 bit characters
     string t = Encoding.ASCII.GetString(b);
     Regex re = new Regex("[^a-zA-Z0-9]=-_/");
     string c = re.Replace(t, " ");
     return c;
 }
share|improve this answer
Imports System.Text
Imports System.Globalization

 Public Function DECODE(ByVal x As String) As String
        Dim sb As New StringBuilder
        For Each c As Char In x.Normalize(NormalizationForm.FormD).Where(Function(a) CharUnicodeInfo.GetUnicodeCategory(a) <> UnicodeCategory.NonSpacingMark)  
            sb.Append(c)
        Next
        Return sb.ToString()
    End Function
share|improve this answer
    
Using NFD instead of NFC would cause changes far beyond those requested. – Jon Hanna Jun 22 '15 at 14:04

What this person said:

Encoding.ASCII.GetString(Encoding.GetEncoding(1251).GetBytes(text));

It actually splits the likes of å which is one character (which is character code 00E5, not 0061 plus the modifier 030A which would look the same) into a plus some kind of modifier, and then the ASCII conversion removes the modifier, leaving the only a.

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