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I'm trying to convert some strings that are in French Canadian and basically, I'd like to be able to take out the French accent marks in the letters while keeping the letter. (E.g. convert é to e.)

What is the best method for achieving this?

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2  
A warning: This approach might work in some specific cases, but in general you cannot just remove diacritical marks. In some cases and some languages this might change the meaning of the text. You don't say why you want to do this; if it is for the sake of comparing strings or searching you are most probably better off by using a unicode-aware library for this. –  JacquesB Oct 30 '08 at 10:48
    
Related stackoverflow.com/questions/3769457/… –  BrunoLM Sep 22 '10 at 15:29
    
@JacquesB Apologies - I now realize you were (legitimately) questioning the OP (as opposed to commenting on an answer). Damn, where's the undo, sorry! at-BrunoLM - that question is a dup, can this link be removed? at-JamesHall - your deleted answer to self should become a comment or an edit –  Ruben Bartelink May 15 '13 at 20:23
1  
Since most of the techniques to achieve this rely on Unicode normalization, this document describing the standard may be useful to read: unicode.org/reports/tr15 –  LuddyPants Dec 16 '13 at 23:50
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12 Answers 12

up vote 187 down vote accepted

I've not used this method, but Michael Kaplan describes a method for doing so in his blog post (with a confusing title) that talks about stripping diacritics: Stripping is an interesting job (aka On the meaning of meaningless, aka All Mn characters are non-spacing, but some are more non-spacing than others)

static string RemoveDiacritics(string text) 
{
    var normalizedString = text.Normalize(NormalizationForm.FormD);
    var stringBuilder = new StringBuilder();

    foreach (var c in normalizedString)
    {
        var unicodeCategory = CharUnicodeInfo.GetUnicodeCategory(c);
        if (unicodeCategory != UnicodeCategory.NonSpacingMark)
        {
            stringBuilder.Append(c);
        }
    }

    return stringBuilder.ToString().Normalize(NormalizationForm.FormC);
}

Note that this is a followup to his earlier post: Stripping diacritics....

The approach uses String.Normalize to split the input string into constituent glyphs (basically separating the "base" characters from the diacritics) and then scans the result and retains only the base characters. It's just a little complicated, but really you're looking at a complicated problem.

Of course, if you're limiting yourself to French, you could probably get away with the simple table-based approach in How to remove accents and tilde in a C++ std::string, as recommended by @David Dibben.

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Thanks for this, marked as the answer. Basically my application needed to take a title of a section for a website, and change that to a "viewname" in which our flash application could relate it to our navigation bar. this does precisely what i need. –  James Hall Oct 30 '08 at 13:52
    
Perfect solution ... far better than Regular expression based clean up like this myownpercept.com/2009/06/replacing-special-chars-string-csharp –  Jalal El-Shaer Jul 7 '10 at 22:37
1  
@SimonTewsi one thing that immediately occurs is that it'll mean you've Hangul syllables rather than conjoining Jamo, which as well as being required for NFC also has better font support in practice. –  Jon Hanna Sep 3 '12 at 19:23
7  
This is wrong. German characters ä and ö and ü get latinized as ae ue and oe, and not as a, o u ... –  Quandary Nov 20 '12 at 13:41
1  
Also Norse ø is ignored –  GeenHenk Mar 25 at 8:09
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this did the trick for me...

string accentedStr;
byte[] tempBytes;
tempBytes = System.Text.Encoding.GetEncoding("ISO-8859-8").GetBytes(accentedStr);
string asciiStr = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetString(tempBytes);

quick&short!

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why do you use ISO-8859-8 to encode the string and UTF8 to decode it? wouldn't it be better to also use ISO-8859-8 to decode the byte array? –  Dominik von Weber Oct 11 '13 at 5:09
    
@DominikvonWeber this is just small "issue", but the solution is much better than the one most voted. this one at least is working for chars like ł, ą, ó etc. :) –  Gutek Oct 31 '13 at 9:26
1  
This is as far the best method I've seen. –  Cleiton Jan 31 at 3:27
    
This works for ł and ø, unlike those which uses Normalize() in C#. –  Noble_Bright_Life Apr 24 at 5:01
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In case someone is interested, I was looking for something similar and ended writing the following:

    public static string NormalizeStringForUrl(string name)
    {
        String normalizedString = name.Normalize(NormalizationForm.FormD);
        StringBuilder stringBuilder = new StringBuilder();

        foreach (char c in normalizedString)
        {
            switch (CharUnicodeInfo.GetUnicodeCategory(c))
            {
                case UnicodeCategory.LowercaseLetter:
                case UnicodeCategory.UppercaseLetter:
                case UnicodeCategory.DecimalDigitNumber:
                    stringBuilder.Append(c);
                    break;
                case UnicodeCategory.SpaceSeparator:
                case UnicodeCategory.ConnectorPunctuation:
                case UnicodeCategory.DashPunctuation:
                    stringBuilder.Append('_');
                    break;
            }
        }
        string result = stringBuilder.ToString();
        return String.Join("_", result.Split(new char[] { '_' }
            , StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries)); // remove duplicate underscores
    }
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You should preallocate the StringBuilder buffer to the name.Length to minimize memory allocation overhead. That last Split/Join call to remove sequential duplicate _ is interesting. Perhaps we should just avoid adding them in the loop. Set a flag for the previous character being an _ and not emit one if true. –  IDisposable Sep 1 '09 at 21:18
    
2 really good points, I'll rewrite it if I ever get the time to go back to this portion of code :) –  Luk Sep 8 '09 at 9:14
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In case anyone's interested, here is the java equivalent:

import java.text.Normalizer;

public class MyClass
{
    public static String removeDiacritics(String input)
    {
        String nrml = Normalizer.normalize(input, Normalizer.Form.NFD);
        StringBuilder stripped = new StringBuilder();
        for (int i=0;i<nrml.length();++i)
        {
            if (Character.getType(nrml.charAt(i)) != Character.NON_SPACING_MARK)
            {
                stripped.append(nrml.charAt(i));
            }
        }
        return stripped.toString();
    }
}
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1  
instead of stripped += nrml.charAt(i) use a StringBuilder. you have O(n²) runtime hidden here. –  Andreas Petersson Sep 9 '09 at 8:50
    
updated per above - nice catch! –  KenE Sep 9 '09 at 18:17
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I don't really know what your situation is, but I would strongly encourage you not to do this. A good reference is Joel's article The Absolute Minimum Every Software Developer Absolutely, Positively Must Know About Unicode and Character Sets (No Excuses!).

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8  
That's a great article! But I think James has a unique situation that warrants this with respect to urls in the address bar...no? –  Codewerks Oct 31 '08 at 15:32
3  
URLs are a good excuse, I've been thinking that it could even be a good idea to romanize Arabic for the same purpose, by replacing every Arabic letter by an ASCII letter that sounds similar. –  Osama ALASSIRY Dec 30 '08 at 12:03
2  
One general case when this is valid is when searching and matching data across different languages and sources. Then this makes all sources consistent and suitable for matching (but not for presenting). –  topchef Aug 17 '10 at 21:02
    
One example. The accent has to be omitted in all-uppercase words in Greek. So definitely there are situations where you have to remove accents from text. –  DixonD Mar 21 '11 at 7:41
1  
@x0n, (better late than ever..) nope.. upper case greek can have accents as well (ie. Ά, Έ, Ό, Ή...) .. But for searching, most database systems support AI collations (Accent Insensitive) –  Gaby aka G. Petrioli Mar 20 '12 at 9:25
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This works fine in java.

It basically converts all accented characters into their deAccented counterparts followed by their combining diacritics. Now you can use a regex to strip off the diacritics.

import java.text.Normalizer;
import java.util.regex.Pattern;

public String deAccent(String str) {
    String nfdNormalizedString = Normalizer.normalize(str, Normalizer.Form.NFD); 
    Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("\\p{InCombiningDiacriticalMarks}+");
    return pattern.matcher(nfdNormalizedString).replaceAll("");
}
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THIS IS THE VB VERSION (Works with GREEK) :

Imports System.Text

Imports System.Globalization

Public Function RemoveDiacritics(ByVal s As String)
    Dim normalizedString As String
    Dim stringBuilder As New StringBuilder
    normalizedString = s.Normalize(NormalizationForm.FormD)
    Dim i As Integer
    Dim c As Char
    For i = 0 To normalizedString.Length - 1
        c = normalizedString(i)
        If CharUnicodeInfo.GetUnicodeCategory(c) <> UnicodeCategory.NonSpacingMark Then
            stringBuilder.Append(c)
        End If
    Next
    Return stringBuilder.ToString()
End Function
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I often use an extenstion method based on another version I found here (see Replacing characters in C# (ascii)) A quick explanation:

  • Normalizing to form D splits charactes like è to an e and a nonspacing `
  • From this, the nospacing characters are removed
  • The result is normalized back to form D (I'm not sure if this is neccesary)

Code:

using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Globalization;

// namespace here
public static class Utility
{
    public static string RemoveDiacritics(this string str)
    {
        if (str == null) return null;
        var chars =
            from c in str.Normalize(NormalizationForm.FormD).ToCharArray()
            let uc = CharUnicodeInfo.GetUnicodeCategory(c)
            where uc != UnicodeCategory.NonSpacingMark
            select c;

        var cleanStr = new string(chars.ToArray()).Normalize(NormalizationForm.FormC);

        return cleanStr;
    }
}
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Try HelperSharp package.

There is a method RemoveAccents:

 public static string RemoveAccents(this string source)
 {
     //8 bit characters 
     byte[] b = Encoding.GetEncoding(1251).GetBytes(source);

     // 7 bit characters
     string t = Encoding.ASCII.GetString(b);
     Regex re = new Regex("[^a-zA-Z0-9]=-_/");
     string c = re.Replace(t, " ");
     return c;
 }
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This is how i replace diacritic characters to non-diacritic ones in all my .NET program

C#:

//Transforms the culture of a letter to its equivalent representation in the 0-127 ascii table, such as the letter 'é' is substituted by an 'e'
public string RemoveDiacritics(string s)
{
    string normalizedString = null;
    StringBuilder stringBuilder = new StringBuilder();
    normalizedString = s.Normalize(NormalizationForm.FormD);
    int i = 0;
    char c = '\0';

    for (i = 0; i <= normalizedString.Length - 1; i++)
    {
        c = normalizedString[i];
        if (CharUnicodeInfo.GetUnicodeCategory(c) != UnicodeCategory.NonSpacingMark)
        {
            stringBuilder.Append(c);
        }
    }

    return stringBuilder.ToString().ToLower();
}

VB .NET:

'Transforms the culture of a letter to its equivalent representation in the 0-127 ascii table, such as the letter "é" is substituted by an "e"'
Public Function RemoveDiacritics(ByVal s As String) As String
    Dim normalizedString As String
    Dim stringBuilder As New StringBuilder
    normalizedString = s.Normalize(NormalizationForm.FormD)
    Dim i As Integer
    Dim c As Char

    For i = 0 To normalizedString.Length - 1
        c = normalizedString(i)
        If CharUnicodeInfo.GetUnicodeCategory(c) <> UnicodeCategory.NonSpacingMark Then
            stringBuilder.Append(c)
        End If
    Next
    Return stringBuilder.ToString().ToLower()
End Function
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you can use string extension from MMLib.Extensions nuget package:

using MMLib.RapidPrototyping.Generators;
public void ExtensionsExample()
{
  string target = "aácčeéií";
  Assert.AreEqual("aacceeii", target.RemoveDiacritics());
} 

Nuget page: https://www.nuget.org/packages/MMLib.Extensions/ Codeplex project site https://mmlib.codeplex.com/

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Public Function ReplacEnglish(ByVal _Eng As String) As String

    Dim OutStr As String = _Eng.ToLower.Replace("a", "") _
    .Replace("b", "") _
    .Replace("c", "") _
    .Replace("d", "") _
    .Replace("e", "") _
    .Replace("f", "") _
    .Replace("g", "") _
    .Replace("h", "") _
    .Replace("i", "") _
    .Replace("j", "") _
    .Replace("k", "") _
    .Replace("l", "") _
    .Replace("m", "") _
    .Replace("n", "") _
    .Replace("o", "") _
    .Replace("p", "") _
    .Replace("q", "") _
    .Replace("r", "") _
    .Replace("s", "") _
    .Replace("t", "") _
    .Replace("u", "") _
    .Replace("v", "") _
    .Replace("w", "") _
    .Replace("x", "") _
    .Replace("y", "") _
    .Replace("z", "")

    Return OutStr

End Function
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Who needs alphabet anyway? –  Crono Mar 12 at 18:31
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