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int main()
{
  struct node
  {
    char i;
    int a;
  };
  printf("sizeof(struct node) =%d\n",sizeof(struct node));
  return 0;
}

The output for this program is 8 byte. Here sizeof(int)+size(char) is not equal to 8 byte. Still, we are getting 8 byte. It is because of padding. Thats fine. But in the following program, this very concept is being violated. Why?

int main()
{
  struct node
  {
    double i;
    int a;
  };
  printf("sizeof(struct node) =%d\n",sizeof(struct node));
  return 0;
}

if sizeof(double) is 8 byte then sizeof(struct node) should be 16 byte(as per first program). But it is printing 12 byte. Why?

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marked as duplicate by David Brabant, Danilo Valente, Emile, Pedro Morte Rolo, AdrianHHH Jul 23 at 13:07

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
Well, your ints appear to have 4 bytes and 8+4 is 12… Also, use %zu for size_t. –  mafso Jul 23 at 11:03
    
@mafso: have a look on this link. stackoverflow.com/questions/119123/… –  user3686233 Jul 23 at 11:05
2  
why you don't check how large is your data with sizeof(double)+sizeof(int). After that sizeof(node) should be >= sizeof(int)+sizeof(data). –  Klaus Jul 23 at 11:05
    
but padding and object alignment are usually followed in C. Why is it not being followed here? –  user3686233 Jul 23 at 11:06
4  
Your machine seems to feel comfortable with 4-byte alignment. Why you expect the padding in the first place (you cannot assume padding to occur, just like you cannot assume it not to, generally)? –  mafso Jul 23 at 11:09

3 Answers 3

I tried it on my system, and it returns 16 even if i define a as a char. That's because the padding is machine-dependant.

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First of all size of data type and structure padding depends on your machine architecture as well as compiler you are using.

Structure allocates the memory is sum of all the elements size of structure. In case of 32 bit int is 4 byte and double is 8 byte. What i think is you are running on a 32 bit machine thats why you are getting 4(int) + 8(double) = 12 byte .

if you will run on a different architecture,output will differ according the size of data types and structure padding.

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This happens due to byte alignment and padding which let the structure comes out to 12 bytes (or words) on your 32-bit (possibly) platform.

For example, if I use this:

struct first 
{
  int a;
  int b;
}first;

struct second 
{
  int a:4;
  int b:8;
}second;

In first, when I use sizeof(struct first), it will give an output of 8 (i.e. 2 X 4-Bytes Integers). But in the second case, instead of 12 bits (4+8), it gives 4 as a value as the second structure is padded so that it becomes a single word (in a 32-bit system).

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