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My question is about merging 2 techniques:

  • Call recursively to super functions
  • Call recursively to the same function

Suppose a root class that has a recursive function (foo), and a extended class that override this function ( foo): the override function must call super::foo, but require to perform other operations before to call recursively.

I will try an example (it is only an example, and I know there is non-recursive way to solve this problem)

class Node
{
public:
    // must be override
    virtual int getNumValues()
    {
        if (parent) return parent->getNumValues() + 3;
        else return 3; 
    }
protected:
    Node *parent;
private:
    int values[3];
};

class ExtNode: Node
{
public:
    //@override
    virtual int getNumValues()
    {
        int aux = Node::getNumValues(); //but need to avoid recursion here.
        if (parent) return parent->getNumValues() + aux + 2;
        else return aux + 2;
    }
private:
    int extValues[2];
};

So what I would is:

  • I may change both classes: Node and ExtNode.
  • I would not to copy the code from the first class method to the second to avoid Super call (the class chain may be long)
  • The recursive call should probably be done by the childest class

I am trying some ideas, but they seem poor programming practice or not possibles:

// In Node class
...
virtual int getNumValues()
{
    if (parent && !isNodeObject(this)) return parent->getNumValues()+3;
    else return 3;
}
bool isNodeObject( Node *ob)
{
    //return if ob is instance of Node (and not an extended class). How?
}

I have also tried with optional parameters:

// In Node class
...
virtual int getNumValues( bool recursion = true)
{
    if (parent && recursion) return parent->getNumValues()+3;
    else return 3;
}  

// In ExtNode class
...
virtual int getNumValues( bool recursion = true)
{
    int aux = Node::getNumValues(false );
    if (parent && recursion) return parent->getNumValues() + aux + 2;
    else return aux + 2;
}

What is the best programming practice for that?

EDIT 1: Explanation of the real problem I am trying to resolve (asked from Joachim Pileborg)

I am creating a User interface library, that is, a set of classes and function to create easily widgets like frame, buttons, input texts, etc.

I have created a basic (root class) widget with most general features, a "Visible" widget to implement all generic functions for widgets that has a visible part, and soo on.

There are also some containers, like frames, layout and windows.

Now come the hard part: there is a function "updateStyle" that is supposed to update at once all the graphic part of the widget (and redraw it): this function call recursively to super class to perform more generic features, and also has to call recursively to containers to propagate changes (dimensions and positions of widgets may change)

enter image description here

Each widget is supposed to work "as this" and also to be extendable, that is why these requirements.

Code is extensive (about 8k lines) and has a lot of other features, so no point to copy here the code.

share|improve this question
1  
Could you perhaps elaborate a little on why you want to do something like this? Because right now we only see a couple of possible solutions you thought up, but we don't know anything about the actual problem you are trying to solve. This is called the X-Y problems. –  Joachim Pileborg Jul 23 '14 at 12:32
1  
Of course, I will edit and do my best. –  Adrian Maire Jul 23 '14 at 12:33
1  
+1 for your positive attitude, which is way too rare these days –  Park Young-Bae Jul 23 '14 at 12:34
2  
This seems like a general inversion of control problem. It should be relatively easily solved by breaking the functions down into smaller parts in the base class, so that the child classes can override only the parts they alter. The base class framework can then call these smaller methods in the correct order. Then child classes should be able to safely call the superclass method if they're adding to its functionality, or it should be less of a headache to reimplement the parts they don't change if they do something incompatable. –  aruisdante Jul 23 '14 at 12:58
1  
@aruisdante So you are basically suggesting the template function pattern? –  o_weisman Jul 23 '14 at 13:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It looks like you are searching for the template method pattern:

  • in the base class, implement a nonvirtual method that outlines the general behavior of the function.
  • define (abstract) virtual methods that define the special behavior parts inside that function
  • in derived classes, override the special behavior

    class Node
    {
    public:
      int getAllNumValues()
      {
        int allNumValues = getNumValues();
    
        if (parent) allNumValues += parent->getAllNumValues();
    
        return allNumValues; 
      }
    
    protected:
      virtual int getNumValues() {
         return 3;
      }; 
    private:
      Node *parent;
      int values[3];
    };
    
    class ExtNode: Node
    {
    protected:
      //@override
      virtual int getNumValues()
      {
        return 2 + Node::getNumValues(); //but need to avoid recursion here.
      }
    private:
      int extValues[2];
    };
    

in case of your update functionality I'd suggest to have a template method update that does the recursive updating of your composite pattern, and another method updateThis that does updating of only the single object.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 This solution look good, thanks you and also to @aruisdante for the the draft idea. –  Adrian Maire Jul 23 '14 at 14:00
    
The issue here is that there are still public virtuals. See the link in my answer for why this is not ideal. –  Jon Jul 23 '14 at 14:10
    
@Jon: Your articles put virtuals functions as private only because "there's no need to ever make them anything but private" (leaving aside this questionable rule). As I said, this questions is for a library, which is supposed to be expanded more and more, so lot of public functions must be virtual to allow further extensions. Anyway, this solution allow to switch these 2 virtual functions to private scope. –  Adrian Maire Jul 23 '14 at 14:31
1  
@AdrianMaire: What you can do is make getAllNumValues() public and non-virtual, and call a private virtual function (eg DoGetAllNumValues) which can then be overridden as needed. –  Jon Jul 23 '14 at 15:02
1  
@Jon: (1) can be the right thing to do depending on the freedom the derived class is meant to have in the implementation of the method. If the function can have an arbitrary result and in this case ExtNode chose to return the base class number plus 2, then this is legit. Similar for (2). I chose to stay close to the original code in the question and not stray from the problem asked. (3) making the function public was a flaw of mine but still does not violate the LSP since the interface is not more restrictive than the base class. –  Arne Mertz Jul 24 '14 at 10:09

According to Herb Sutter's article: Virtuality, we should prefer to make virtual functions private. This implies that we should try to avoid calling "super" versions and instead make the base class do the work.

Here's an example:

class Node
{
public:
    int getNumValues()
    {
        int result = 3 + DoGetNumValues();
        if (parent)
            result += parent->getNumValues();
        return result;
    }

private:
    Node *parent;
    int values[3];
    virtual int DoGetNumValues() {return 0;}
};

class ExtNode : public Node
{
private:
    int extValues[2];
    int DoGetNumValues() override sealed {return 2 + GetMoreValues();}
    virtual int GetMoreValues() {return 0;}
};

class Derived : public ExtNode
{
     int GetMoreValues() override {return 1;}
};
share|improve this answer
    
Your solution seem to call O(2^n -1) times getNumValues instead of O(n): calling getNumValues() on an ExtNode object, the function perform a recursive call and after to go inside DoGetNumValues which make a new recursive call. –  Adrian Maire Jul 23 '14 at 14:35
    
@AdrianMaire: that was based off your ExtNode::getNumValues() which called parent->getNumValues() twice. I've edited to make the call only once. –  Jon Jul 23 '14 at 15:00
    
Supposing a 3th class that extend ExtNode, your solution has problems: DoGetNumValues only return the most child value, but not the sum of all, so for example, if the 3th class has 1 more values, the result will be 1, not 6. –  Adrian Maire Jul 23 '14 at 15:26
    
@AdrianMaire: you can then repeat the pattern, make DoGetNumValues() sealed {return 2+GetMoreValues();} It's not pretty, but still better than calling super functions. –  Jon Jul 23 '14 at 15:38
    
You are falling in the first problem: calling getNumValues from DoGetNumValues, you skeep the recursion for child classes. –  Adrian Maire Jul 23 '14 at 15:45

For the first example,

Node::getNumValues() computes some function of a tree.

ExtNode::getNumValues() computes another function of a tree. Either result of

ExtNode::getNumValues() is function of ( Node::getNumValues(), tree ) or it depends on tree only.

For UI problem, Think about chain of responsibility design pattern. Forward update request up to the root node, which in its turn initiates tree traversal to update all nodes starting from root.

share|improve this answer

One way to deal with this is to make the function non virtual, then explicitly call in each override the super classe's function (similar to the constructor).

Having the method non-virtual means that each class that is inherited will have it's own implementation of the method, so you won't overwrite the classe's parent code by writing a implementation of the function.

The downside will be that you will have to call the function via a pointer that is explicitly of a certain type, thus forcing you to know the type.

To avoid this drawback, make a virtual function that calls the required recursive function, and use that function instead.

As a side note, non-virtual functions should be avoided.

Here's a sample code

class base
{
public:
    int doStuff()
    {
        printf(" base called ");
        return 0;
    }
};

class ext : public base
{
public:
    int doStuff()
    {
        base::doStuff();
        printf(" ext called ");
        return 0;
    };
};

class ext2 : public ext
{
public:
    int doStuff()
    {
        ext::doStuff();
        printf(" ext 2 called");
        return 0;
    };
};


void runTest()
{
    base* ptr = new ext2();

    ptr->doStuff();

    ext2* recast = (ext2*) ptr;
    recast->doStuff();

}

For the code above, the output will be " base called base called ext called ext2 called".

If you declare the doStuff function virtual in the base class (thus making it virutal for every child class) the output will be " base called ext called ext2 called base called ext called ext2 called".

share|improve this answer
1  
The problem the OP is running into isn't that they can't figure out how to make the calls propagate, it's that effectively they're trying to alter just a portion of the implementation of the superclass method but retain the rest of the functionality. In this case, they're altering the return value fed into a recursive call. Unfortunately this call is also made at the base level. Calling the base method at all from the child method will result in this recursive chain being called many times. –  aruisdante Jul 23 '14 at 13:39
    
removing the virtual is not a good idea, since calling doStuff on a ext object via a base pointer will pretend that a base got called, and not an ext. –  Arne Mertz Jul 23 '14 at 13:40

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