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In a grid (10*10), there are two snakes: A and B. In each turn, the snake leaves one more part behind. So it looks like this:

Step 1:

. . . . . . . . . .
.                 .
.     B           .
.                 .
.                 .
.                 .
.                 .
.     A           .
.                 .
. . . . . . . . . .

Step 2:

. . . . . . . . . .
.                 .
.     _B          .
.                 .
.                 .
.                 .
.     A           .
.     |           .
.                 .
. . . . . . . . . .

Step 3:

. . . . . . . . . .
.                 .
.     __B         .
.                 .
.                 .
.     A           .
.     |           .
.     |           .
.                 .
. . . . . . . . . .

The goal for each snake is to survive longer than the previous ona, if he crasches into wall or part of someones body, he dies and the opponent wins.

The question is, if there are any well-known algorythms that would determine which way the snake should go? The only ones I can think of are really simple and probably useless.

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Should the game be beatable? Well generally, if the snake is just trying to survive, it should head into open space / biggest possibility space...

What you need to do is, (as in many games it is done (like chess)) to assign a value to a given situation based on some grading system. Them compute the all next possible "state" (you moved and or the enemy moved). Compare those two states and chose a better one.

You could grade "makes the possibilities of enemy smaller + makes own possibilities bigger". You can also assume that the enemy snake will chose based on a similar system (i assume human player).

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Isn't that susceptible to local optimum? – Alejandro Jul 23 '14 at 12:40
    
@AlejandroLucena No you could assign the value on a min-max algorithm that would be (globally) perfect – usr1234567 Jul 23 '14 at 12:41
    
So it would be like an Alpha-Beta pruning approach? – Alejandro Jul 23 '14 at 12:42
    
Yes it would. But here you can choose how deep you go, and add in some element of randomness / threshold... after all i assume it is supposed to be a playable and enjoyable game. would be boring if the enemy makes always the same moves or the best choice... – Daniel Kogan Jul 23 '14 at 12:44
    
Look at this coincidence.. I also posted my answer (depth limited alpha-beta) at the same time you posted your answer – Alejandro Jul 23 '14 at 12:46

You can try an Alpha-Beta pruning / depth-limited approach or Expectimax search. This way each snake will calculate an optimal way to play based on a given depth since it would be quite difficult to enumerate the entire space.

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Your snake should try to separate a part of the area and stay inside the bigger one, while the opponent should be on the other side. Once that's done, you simply go along to the nearest wall, and walk up and down until you reach a wall, then move one step aside. That should be possible until your opponent dies because you have more space.

Your snake should detect that the other snake tries the same and should prevent it. Preventing means trying to walk into the bigger side of the separation wall.

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But how to achieve that in code? The start position is not always the same (but is symetric). – ViliX64 Jul 23 '14 at 12:35
    
That's your work, you asked for algorithm, not for code. Go and try yourself. If you get stuck and have a good question, come back. – usr1234567 Jul 23 '14 at 12:37
    
I meant in the runtime, not in exact code :) I will try that. Thanks. – ViliX64 Jul 23 '14 at 12:38
    
It's also not really a good algorithm. Since that is easy to prevent and the snake would be left without guidance... – Daniel Kogan Jul 23 '14 at 12:39
    
You could write two modes: 1. Try to separate spaces and get into the bigger one. 2. Fill the available space. The second is easy, you might want to start with that. Then try the first. Some value function as Daniel Kogan suggests is helpful. – usr1234567 Jul 23 '14 at 12:40

Though minmax and alpha-beta pruning seems inevitable but you might want to ponder on convex hull algorithms for starting moves when board is free as for convex hull of free points would be nice way for you to prevent closed spaces with boundaries of walls which make available more board positions to visit which improve changes of longetivity in the game.

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