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I'm trying to plot a graph that has two-line labels on its xticks. I cannot reduce the font anymore because it becomes unreadable (the plot is part of a 2x2 multiplot). The problem is that the separation between the two lines in a label is too big, so that they become too close to the labels of the next columns.

I would like to reduce the interline spacing so that the lines of a label become closer between them, but further to the lines of the other labels.

I've thought about placing the labels manually (using a function to compute the position of each line), but before doing it I would like to know if someone has a simpler solution.

Thanks a lot!

I'm using "gnuplot 4.6 patchlevel 4" on Ubuntu 14. The folowing is a MWE:

# Requires gnuplot >= 4.6
set terminal pdf color solid font "Helvetica, 10" enhanced size 4, 3.72
set output 'mwe.pdf'
set border 3 lc rgb "#000000"
set bmargin 9
set ylabel offset -1
TicksFont = ", 10"
Title2Font = ", 14"

set yrange[0:180 < * ]
set format y "%.0f%%"

set xtics out scale 0, 0 nomirror rotate by 90 right offset 0,0 font TicksFont
set ytics out nomirror font TicksFont
unset key

set datafile separator ";"
set style fill transparent solid 1.0 border -1
set style data boxes
set boxwidth 1.0

#Bottom-left plot
set title "C) Third (sub)plot" font Title2Font

plot '-' using ($0):2:(0xFF8080):xtic(1) notitle lc rgb variable
# Label; Value
01. Aaaaa:\nAaaaaaaaa(AA);                  100
02. Bbbbb:\nBbbbbbbbbbbb(BB);               20
03. Ccccc: Ccccccc(Ccc),\nCccccccc(CCC);    30
04. Dddd: DDDD,\nDDDDDDDDDDDD(DD);          40
;NaN
01. Aaaaa:\nAaaaaaaaa(AA);                  100
02. Bbbbb:\nBbbbbbbbbbbb(BB);               20
03. A single-liner;                         30
04. Dddd: DDDD,\nDDDDDDDDDDDD(DD);          40
;NaN
01. Aaaaa:\nAaaaaaaaa(AA);                  100
02. Bbbbb:\nBbbbbbbbbbbb(BB);               20
03. A single-liner;                         30
04. Dddd: DDDD,\nDDDDDDDDDDDD(DD);          40
05. Eeee: EEEE,\nEEEEEEEEEEEE(EE);          50
end;
share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

From gnuplot you cannot directly control the line height used for the labels. But there is a quite dirty workaround for your problem:

You can split your label at the new line character, change the font size of each line with the enhanced label syntax, but set a different font size for the new line character. So a label

set label at 0,0 "first line\nsecond line" font ",10"

is changed to

set label at 0,0 "{/=10 first line}\n{/=10 second line} font ",8"

And your script changes to:

# Requires gnuplot >= 4.6
set terminal pdf color solid font "Helvetica, 10" enhanced size 4, 3.72
set output 'mwe.pdf'
set border 3 lc rgb "#000000"
set bmargin 9
set ylabel offset -1
TickSize = 10
TicksFont = ", ".TickSize
Title2Font = ", 14"

set yrange[0:180 < * ]
set format y "%.0f%%"

set xtics out scale 0, 0 nomirror rotate by 90 right offset -0.1,0 font ",8"
set ytics out nomirror font TicksFont
unset key

set datafile separator ";"
set style fill transparent solid 1.0 border -1
set style data boxes
set boxwidth 1.0

#Bottom-left plot
set title "C) Third (sub)plot" font Title2Font

set_label_size(s) = sprintf('{/=%d %s}', TickSize, s)
label(s) = strstrt(s, "\n") ? set_label_size(s[:strstrt(s, "\n")-1])."\n".set_label_size(s[strstrt(s, "\n")+1:]) : set_label_size(s)

plot '-' using ($0):2:(0xFF8080):xtic(label(strcol(1))) notitle lc rgb variable
# Label; Value
01. Aaaaa:\nAaaaaaaaa(AA);                  100
02. Bbbbb:\nBbbbbbbbbbbb(BB);               20
03. Ccccc: Ccccccc(Ccc),\nCccccccc(CCC);    30
04. Dddd: DDDD,\nDDDDDDDDDDDD(DD);          40
;NaN
01. Aaaaa:\nAaaaaaaaa(AA);                  100
02. Bbbbb:\nBbbbbbbbbbbb(BB);               20
03. A single-liner;                         30
04. Dddd: DDDD,\nDDDDDDDDDDDD(DD);          40
;NaN
01. Aaaaa:\nAaaaaaaaa(AA);                  100
02. Bbbbb:\nBbbbbbbbbbbb(BB);               20
03. A single-liner;                         30
04. Dddd: DDDD,\nDDDDDDDDDDDD(DD);          40
05. Eeee: EEEE,\nEEEEEEEEEEEE(EE);          50
end;

Before (left) and after (right):

enter image description here enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Oh! That's really great! Thanks a lot for the trick. This answer solves the problem stated in the title (the horizontal offset of the ticks needs to be manually adjusted once), shows how to change the font size inside a label and how to use C-style functions on GNUplot! – Mike Jul 24 '14 at 9:02

You can switch to the epslatex terminal and use latex syntax on your gnuplot script directly. Then you can use the \vspace{} command with a negative argument to decrease the interline spacing, something like this:

\shortstack{01. Aaaaa: \vspace{-0.2em} \\ Aaaaaaaaa(AA)}

Although you'll need to escape backslashes:

\\shortstack{01. Aaaaa: \\vspace{-0.2em} \\\\ Aaaaaaaaa(AA)}
share|improve this answer
    
This answer also seems pretty interesting, especially because it would allow for more complex post-editting in latex. However, I need to keep generating PDF files for the figures (although I guess I could use the gnuplot-generated tex file to generate a standalone PDF figure as well). – Mike Jul 24 '14 at 9:10
    
Question for seasoned members: Given that I cannot try this answer by myself right now, but that it seems to be interesting (and correct), should I accept this answer as well? – Mike Jul 24 '14 at 9:11
    
@Mike You can indeed use set term epslatex standalone and then just pdflatex to generate a PDF file. What I do instead is I have an external tex file where I load the gnuplot-generated one. In this way I can load more packages and so on (standalone header allows a few packages as well). You can have a look at this answer I gave before for an example of how I do it, including cropping: stackoverflow.com/questions/22427878/…. Regarding your second question, you can only accept one answer, which should be Christoph's. – Miguel Jul 24 '14 at 9:24
    
@Miguel You could also use a gnuplot.cfg file which gets included automatically. @Mike You can combine both answers and do the formatting suggested by Miguel on-the-fly by changing the functions label and set_label_size in my answer accordingly. – Christoph Jul 24 '14 at 11:03

Would it be acceptable to just change the size of the whole plot, for example by changing the plot width from 4 inches to 6 and the height from 3.72 to 5.58?

This way the aspect ratio is preserved if you include it in a different document.

Before:

enter image description here

After:

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Well, unfortunately, this is not acceptable. As the image has a fixed width in the final document (1\textwidth in pdflatex), increasing the width changes the aspect ratio. To keep the width, I guess that latex calculates the font sizes and the labels end up being smaller than in the original case. (Thanks, anyways!) – Mike Jul 23 '14 at 16:40
    
At this point, I've solved my issue by hand-crafting the labels. However, this is something that tingles my programmer-brain, so I would still like to know if anyone has a better solution. – Mike Jul 23 '14 at 16:42
    
How about changing both height and width (I think you mentioned that you were already using the minimum font size, otherwise I would have suggested that). As long as the aspect ratio is the same the latex code shouldn't have to change. – andyras Jul 23 '14 at 21:02
1  
Sorry for the missunderstanding. I meant that I was using smallest readable font on paper. The figure is plotted in the final document with a fixed width of, say, 15 cm. I think that if I alter the proportions of the figure, then its height is adjusted to keep the ratio for the given width. All the fonts in the figure are recalculated by pdflatex to match the final size. This means that if I want to keep a minimum (final) font size, my only solution is to put labels closer. I think the first answer solves the question in a simple way, but I really appreciate your answers! Thanks a lot! – Mike Jul 24 '14 at 9:16

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