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I've got a redirect dilemma that I can't get past in a bash backup script I'm developing in CentOS 6.4. I want to redirect all output to two separate files: one tmp and one permanent. The script loops through an external source list and I'd like for the tmp log files to be specific to the source, so that I can send an email if that specific source had errors containing that log (and conversely remove the tmp if the backup completes without error).

I'm using exec to tee my output:

exec > >(tee -a ${templog} /var/log/rob/rob.log) 2>&1

This works if I place at the top of the script, but here the variable isn't defined yet, so I can't do source-specific logs.

If I place this within the while loop, it grabs the variable, but writes a copy of each line determined by the total iterations of the loop; for the example below, I have four sources it iterates through, so I get output for each source in quadruplicate:

-S-07/11/14 09:15:35 ROB-Source Process for cc2-gamma has started-S-
-S-07/11/14 09:15:35 ROB-Source Process for cc2-gamma has started-S-
-S-07/11/14 09:15:35 ROB-Source Process for cc2-gamma has started-S-
-S-07/11/14 09:15:35 ROB-Source Process for cc2-gamma has started-S-
Share cc2-gamma is not Mounted. Try 1 of 5 to mount...
Share cc2-gamma is not Mounted. Try 1 of 5 to mount...
Share cc2-gamma is not Mounted. Try 1 of 5 to mount...
Share cc2-gamma is not Mounted. Try 1 of 5 to mount...

Is there a different way to tee the output within the loop to prevent this (without touching each line of course)? Or is there something rotten in my loops that I'm not seeing? Here's the whole script. Please excuse the mess and style.. I'm clearly not finished. I didn't include the config.conf and backup source file as they don't affect the output. Let me know if needed. Thanks.

#!/bin/bash
#V.2014.0723 - Radation Oncology Backup script
#declarations
SHELL=/bin/sh
PATH=/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/sbin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin:/rob
source /rob/conf/config.conf
while read smbdir 'smbpath' exclfile drive foldername; do
#loop declarations
mountedfile=/rob/${smbdir}.MOUNTED
runningfile=/rob/${smbdir}.RUNNING
lastrunfile=/rob/${smbdir}_${foldername}.LASTRUN
templog=/rob/${smbdir}_${foldername}.TMPLOG
errorfile=/rob/${smbdir}_${foldername}.HAD_ERRORS
backupfile=/rob/${baname:0:3}_rtbackup.sql.bz2      # for the -l seccton below -- sql backup of backup.sql
#exec > >(tee -a ${templog} /var/log/rob/rob.log) 2>&1
### SOURCE BACKUP ##############################################################################################
if [ "$1" == "-s" ]
then
    exec > >(tee -a /var/log/rob/rob.log ${templog}) 2>&1
    #Write Source STDOUT and STDERR to both permanent and temporary log file. Must be in loop to use variables.
    #exec > >(tee -a ${templog} /var/log/rob/rob.log) 2>&1
    #exec > >(tee -a /var/log/rob.log ${templog}) 2>
    if [ "${sources_active}" == "1" ]
    then
    echo "-S-$(date "+%m/%d/%y %T") ROB-Source Process for $smbdir has started-S-" 
    # unmount all cifs shares, due to duplicate mounts, write file to prevent concurrentcy 
    umount -a -t cifs > /dev/null
    # The following will test to see if the souce is mounted, and if not, mount it.
    for i in {1..5}
        do
        if mountpoint -q /mnt/${smbdir}/${drive}/${foldername}
        then
        echo "Share ${smbdir} is Mounted." 
        touch $mountedfile
        break
        else
        sleep 2
        echo "Share ${smbdir} is not Mounted. Try $i of 5 to mount..." 
        mkdir -p /mnt/${smbdir}/${drive}/${foldername} > /dev/null 
        mount -t cifs ${smbpath} -o ro,username=<USER>,password=<PW>,workgroup=<DOMAIN> /mnt/${smbdir}/${drive}/${foldername} 
        fi
        done
    # Test to see if above was successful, and if rob is not already running, run the backup.
    if [[ -f ${mountedfile}&& ! -f ${runningfile} ]]
    then
        src="/mnt/${smbdir}/$drive"
        dst="/backup/rob/"
        touch ${runningfile}
        /root/bin/rtbackup -m /mnt -p ${src}/${foldername} -b ${dst} -x @${exclfile}
        if [ "$?" -ne "0" ]; then
            #Errors Running RTBackup
            rm -f ${runningfile} > /dev/null 2>&1
            rm -f ${mountedfile}> /dev/null 2>&1
            echo "$(date "+%m/%d/%y %T") Source Process for ${smbdir} had errors running:-SSS"  
            echo "$errors" >&2
            touch ${errorfile}
            exit 1
    else
    echo "What the  hell is this doing?"
    fi
            #NO Errors Running RTBACKUP
            rm -f ${templog}
            rm -f ${runningfile} > /dev/null 2>&1
            rm -f ${mountedfile} > /dev/null 2>&1
            echo "$(date "+%m/%d/%y %T") Source Process for ${smbdir} did not have any errors"
    else
        #backup will *NOT* run, cleaning up and logging
        rm -f ${mountedfile} > /dev/null 2>&1
        echo "$(date "+%m/%d/%y %T") ${smbdir} could not be mounted, or is already in progress. Backup could not complete." 
        touch ${errorfile}
        tail /var/log/rob/robso.log | mail -s "ROBSO Failed to run for ${smbdir} on ${baname}" ${email}
    fi
    echo "-F-$(date "+%m/%d/%y %T") ROB-Source Process for ${smbdir} has finished-F-" 
    #break
    elif [[ "${sources_active}" == "0"  ]] 
    then
        echo "***$(date "+%m/%d/%y %T") ROB-Source Process for ${smbdir} did not run because the job is not set as active***" 
    #break
    fi
done < /rob/conf/${baname}.conf
if [ $? -eq 10 ]; then exit 0; fi
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

You can use curly braces to redirect a set of commands; as it says in the bash manual about command grouping, "When commands are grouped, redirections may be applied to the entire command list". It behaves more-or-less like an anonymous function.

{
  command1
  command2
} > >(tee -a ${templog} /var/log/rob/rob.log) 2>&1

You can do the same with a named function, too, if you're so inclined, but I don't know offhand what environment would be used to expand the redirections. (If you do, please edit this answer!)

# Untested. This MIGHT work.
your_log_command() {
  command1
  command2
} > >(tee -a $1 /var/log/rob/rob.log) 2>&1

your_log_command $templog
your_log_command $something_else
share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately I couldn't get your solution to work-- maybe too much going on and something broke a rule of being a function. The only other way I could find was to call the script from cron with a redirect of all output (/rob/rob.sh &>> logfile.log). I wound up just adding the 2>&1 | tee -a ${templog} ${permlog}" to the applicable lines, hung my head in shame for the rest of the day, and had a wonderful night's sleep. –  kiwisan Jul 25 '14 at 15:05

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