Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to sort my query results using 2 fields, created_at and job_code. The issue I'm having is that the job_code is composed of a string that contains numbers and letters which apparently the sort_by method isn't liking.

def structure_jobs(jobs)
  jobs.sort_by{|j| [j.created_at, j.job_code]}.reverse
end

Sample Data:
created_at     |    job_code
Jul-22-2014         140987E
Jul-22-2014         1482923
Jul-22-2014         140987Z
Mar-15-2014         12N7Y65

Results Wanted:
created_at     |    job_code
Jul-22-2014         1482923
Jul-22-2014         140987Z
Jul-22-2014         140987E
Mar-15-2014         12N7Y65

I sort by DESC created_at order, so newest to oldest. If they match on the date then sort by job_code could be in DESC/ASC order doesn't matter as long as they still sort accordingly to their respective order.

share|improve this question
    
If you want them both descending then jobs.sort_by{|j| [j.created_at, j.job_code]}.reverse should be fine, sort_by will only give you problems if you want to mix ascending and descending with non-numeric values. –  mu is too short Jul 23 '14 at 19:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think you should be doing the sorting inside the database:

query.order('created_at desc, job_code asc')

But if you must sort in Ruby then why not use sort instead of sort_by? sort_by is great for simple things but requires strange contortions when you need to reverse-sort one of the components and you can't (cleanly) use simple tricks like negating a number to reverse the order. Using sort you could say:

jobs.sort do |a, b|
  if((b.created_at <=> a.created_at) == 0)
    a.job_code <=> b.job_code
  else
    b.created_at <=> a.created_at
  end
end

to sort descending on created_at and ascending on job_code. For ascending created_at and descending job_code you reverse the as and bs:

jobs.sort do |a, b|
  if((a.created_at <=> b.created_at) == 0)
    b.job_code <=> a.job_code
  else
    a.created_at <=> b.created_at
  end
end

If you're sorting both created_at and job_code ascending then

jobs.sort_by{|j| [j.created_at, j.job_code]}

should work fine. If you're sorting both descending then:

jobs.sort_by{|j| [j.created_at, j.job_code]}.reverse

should work fine.

Demo (based on falsetru's): http://ideone.com/L2vMST

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your help with this issue. In essence your suggestions work perfectly with the data I've given. However, I am still not getting things to sort out properly. I realized that some job_code fields are empty which may be causing issues. Regardless of this your solution perfectly answers my question given the data I have provided. –  Rafa Jul 23 '14 at 20:33
    
What does "empty" mean? Are they nil (AKA NULL inside the database) or empty strings? –  mu is too short Jul 23 '14 at 20:35
    
By empty I am referring to empty string. The issue is I am running into the case where in "DESC" order for both I am getting 140598E, 1482923, 140598Z all three of which have the same created_at –  Rafa Jul 23 '14 at 20:41
    
What order should those three come out in? What order do they come out in? Where would you want an empty string to appear? –  mu is too short Jul 23 '14 at 20:54
    
Ideally I would want them to be in desc order so 1482923, 140598Z, 140598E with empty strings going at the end. To summarize I want records in desc order by created_at and in the event of them being equal sort those by job_code. If created_at are the same I want to order those that match in desc order with empty strings at the bottom. –  Rafa Jul 23 '14 at 21:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.