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I have tried the following:

vrs = [('first text', 1),
       ('second text', 2),
       ('third text', 3),
       ('fourth text', 4),
       ('fifth text', 5),
       ('sixth text', 6),
       ('seventh text', 7),
       ('eighth text', 8),
       ('ninth text', 9),
       ('tenth text', 10),
       ('eleventh text', 11),
       ('twelfth text', 12)
      ]

if all(vr is tuple for vr in vrs):
    print('All are tuples')
else:
    print('Error')

if set(vrs) == {tuple}:
    print('All are tuples')
else:
    print('Error')

The output is Error for both.

Is there any way to check for this (i.e. check if every element in a list is a tuple) without a loop?

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried isinstance? –  Kevin Jul 23 at 18:58
    
In what configuration? If you replace the is or the == above you get an error. –  Dylan Jul 23 at 19:00
    
@user3865473 isinstance is a function, not an operator –  jonrsharpe Jul 23 at 19:02
    
Ok... do as is shown below. :) Thanks everyone. –  Dylan Jul 23 at 19:02
1  
@user3865473 if you're new to Python, you should really think about whether you need to check this at all - would e.g. a list of lists be a problem for your code? –  jonrsharpe Jul 23 at 19:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use isinstance:

isinstance(object, classinfo)

Return true if the object argument is an instance of the classinfo argument, or of a (direct, indirect or virtual) subclass thereof.

vrs = [('first text', 1),
   ('second text', 2),
   ('third text', 3),
   ('fourth text', 4),
   ('fifth text', 5),
   ('sixth text', 6),
   ('seventh text', 7),
   ('eighth text', 8),
   ('ninth text', 9),
   ('tenth text', 10),
   ('eleventh text', 11),
   ('twelfth text', 12)
  ]    
all(isinstance(x,tuple) for x in vrs)
True
vrs = [('first text', 1),
   ('second text', 2),
   ('third text', 3),
   ('fourth text', 4),
   ('fifth text', 5),
   ('sixth text', 6),
   ('seventh text', 7),
   ('eighth text', 8),
   ('ninth text', 9),
   ('tenth text', 10),
   ('eleventh text', 11),
   'twelfth text'
  ]
  all(isinstance(x,tuple) for x in vrs)
  False
share|improve this answer
    
This does answer the question but cannot address why a Python programmer would ever do this. I simply cannot imagine what ensuring the elements of a list are tuples would buy you. @Dylan I can hand you [(1, 2) (3,) ('four', 'five', 6), (7, 8, 9, 10)] all of which will pass the predicate but will almost certainly cause a fault somewhere down the line. You should understand why duck typing is the norm in Python; largely because it doesn't pretend to solve problems that it can't. –  msw Jul 23 at 23:02

vr is tuple doesn't check whether the object bound to the name vr is of type tuple, it checks whether the names are bound to the same object (i.e. evaluates whether id(vr) == id(tuple)). Inevitably, they aren't; tuple is a type instance, not a tuple instance!

Instead, you should use isinstance:

if all(isinstance(vr, tuple) for vr in vrs):

This supports inheritance (unlike e.g. if all(type(vr) == tuple ...)), so this would also allow e.g. a namedtuple in the input.

However, in Python it is not always necessary to check the type of specific objects (it uses strong, dynamic typing, also known as "duck typing"). Although it is not clear why you want to ensure they are all tuples, is it possible that, for example, all being sequence types (e.g. tuple, list, str) would be acceptable?

share|improve this answer

You could use a filter to remove all tuple elements, such as:

nontuples = filter(lambda vr : vr is not tuple, vrs)

And then check that the remaining iterable is empty. It won't be a list if you're in Python 3.x, but you can make it a list with

nontuples = list(nontuples)
share|improve this answer
1  
is not tuple doesn't check whether an object is an instance of tuple, though, it checks to see whether the object is actually the same object as the one currently named tuple (which is probably the built-in type.) –  DSM Jul 23 at 19:00

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