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I have the following function and need to make it compatible with 64-bit platform:

procedure ExecuteAsm(Tab, Buf: Pointer; Len: DWORD);
asm
     mov   ebx, Tab
     mov   ecx, Len
     mov   edx, Buf
@1:  mov   al,  [edx]
     xlat
     mov   [edx], al
     inc   edx
     dec   ecx
     jnz @1
end;

Delphi XE5 raises error [dcc64 Error] E2107 Operand size mismatch on the lines with Tab and Len parameters.

Unfortunately I don't know assembler enough to fix the issue myself. What should I change to successfully compile the function?

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3  
Why you are using assembler? And you didn't save/restore ebx(rbx) register! –  GJ. Jul 23 '14 at 20:50
1  
Ofc it will mismatch on 64bit. And this kind of optimization will work probably even slower than code generated from pure Pascal source. –  Free Consulting Jul 23 '14 at 23:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Why you are using assembler?

There is no good reason!

This is direct translarion of your asm code to Delphi pascal:

procedure ExecuteAsm(Tab, Buf: PByte; Len: DWORD);
 repeat
   Buf^ := Tab[Buf^];
   inc(Buf);
   dec(Len);
 until Len = 0;
end;

But as you can see now, if value Len is 0 then procedure should corupt program memoray.

...

This code looks better, because while loop test the 0 value and never execute the loop.

procedure ExecuteAsm(Tab, Buf: PByte; Len: cardinal);
begin
  while Len > 0 do
  begin
    Buf^ := Tab[Buf^];
    inc(Buf);
    dec(Len);
  end;
end;

However, if you still like assembler you must preserve ebx/rbx register like...

procedure ExecuteAsm(Tab, Buf: Pointer; Len: DWORD);
asm
    push    ebx   //rbx

//... your code

    pop     ebx   //rbx
end;

EDIT: Added 32 bit and 64 bit tests

Because HeartWare didn't do homework by David Heffernan, I did. Original test made David Heffernan, look HeartWares comments. I have made just a little changes and added two more test cases. This directive is inportant: {$O+} //Turn on compiler optimisation... :)

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

uses
  Diagnostics;

 {$O+} //Turn on compiler optimisation... :)

procedure _asm_GJ(Tab, Buf : PByte; Len : Cardinal);
//    32-bit   eax edx           ecx
//    64-bit   rcx rdx           r8
asm
{$IFDEF CPUX64 }
        test    Len, Len
        jz      @exit
@loop:
        movzx   rax, [Buf]
        mov     al, byte ptr[Tab + rax]
        mov     [Buf],al
        inc     Buf
        dec     Len
        jnz     @loop
{$ELSE }
        test    Len, Len
        jz      @exit
        push    ebx
@loop:
        movzx   ebx, [Buf]
        mov     bl,byte ptr[Tab + ebx]
        mov     [Buf], bl
        inc     Buf
        dec     Len
        jnz     @loop
        pop     ebx
{$ENDIF }
@exit:
end;

procedure _asm_HeartWare(Tab, Buf : PByte; Len : Cardinal);
//  32-bit     EAX EDX           ECX
//  64-bit     RCX RDX           R8
asm
    {$IFDEF CPUX64 }
        XCHG    R8,RCX
        JECXZ   @OUT
        XOR     RAX,RAX
    @LOOP:
        MOV     AL,[RDX]
        MOV     AL,[R8+RAX]
        MOV     [RDX],AL
        INC     RDX
        DEC     ECX
        JNZ     @LOOP
        // LOOP @LOOP
    {$ELSE }
        JECXZ   @OUT
        PUSH    EBX
        XCHG    EAX,EBX
        XOR     EAX,EAX
    @LOOP:
        MOV     AL,[EDX+ECX-1]
        MOV     AL,[EBX+EAX]
        MOV     [EDX+ECX-1],AL
        DEC     ECX
        JNZ     @LOOP
        // LOOP @LOOP
        POP     EBX
    {$ENDIF }
    @OUT:
end;

procedure _pas_normal(Tab, Buf: PByte; Len: Cardinal);
begin
  while Len > 0 do begin
    Buf^ := Tab[Buf^];
    inc(Buf);
    dec(Len);
  end;
end;

procedure _pas_inline(Tab, Buf: PByte; Len: Cardinal); inline;
begin
  while Len > 0 do begin
    Buf^ := Tab[Buf^];
    inc(Buf);
    dec(Len);
  end;
end;

var
  Stopwatch: TStopwatch;
  i: Integer;
  x, y: array [0 .. 1023] of Byte;

procedure refresh;
begin
  for i := low(x) to high(x) do
  begin
    x[i] := i mod 256;
    y[i] := (i + 20) mod 256;
  end;
end;

begin
{$IFDEF CPUX64 }
  Writeln('64 bit mode');
{$ELSE }
  Writeln('32 bit mode');
{$ENDIF }
  refresh;
  Stopwatch := TStopwatch.StartNew;
  for i := 1 to 1000000 do
  begin
    _asm_HeartWare(PByte(@x), PByte(@y), SizeOf(x));
  end;
  Writeln('asm HeartWare : ', Stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds, 'ms');

  refresh;
  Stopwatch := TStopwatch.StartNew;
  for i := 1 to 1000000 do
  begin
    _asm_GJ(PByte(@x), PByte(@y), SizeOf(x));
  end;
  Writeln('asm GJ        : ', Stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds, 'ms');

  refresh;
  Stopwatch := TStopwatch.StartNew;
  for i := 1 to 1000000 do
  begin
    _pas_normal(PByte(@x), PByte(@y), SizeOf(x));
  end;
  Writeln('pas normal    : ', Stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds, 'ms');

  refresh;
  Stopwatch := TStopwatch.StartNew;
  for i := 1 to 1000000 do
  begin
    _pas_inline(PByte(@x), PByte(@y), SizeOf(x));
  end;
  Writeln('pas inline    : ', Stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds, 'ms');

  Readln;
end.

And results...

enter image description here

Cunclusion...

There is almost nothing to say! Numbers talk...

Delphi compiler is good, hmm very good!

I have built in test another asm optimisated procedure, because HeartWare asm optimisation isn't real optimisation.

share|improve this answer
    
Your for loop is no safer than the original code, because the loop body will still execute when Len is 0. And a cardinal is unsigned and cannot be less than 0, so the loop will run forever because the loop counter will wrap to 4294967295 and keep going. In This situation, a while loop is more appropriate: while Len > 0 do begin ... Dec(Len); end; –  Remy Lebeau Jul 23 '14 at 21:33
    
@ Remy Lebeau: under XE3 the for loop should execute only once. I agree with you, while loop is better, corrected, thanx! –  GJ. Jul 23 '14 at 21:47
3  
If performance is critical, inlining the purepascal ExecuteAsm will likely make the routine a little faster. –  LU RD Jul 24 '14 at 8:28

That assembly code is essentially just doing the following, which would work in both 32bit and 64bit:

procedure ExecuteAsm(Tab, Buf: Pointer; Len: DWORD);
var
  pBuf: PByte;
begin
  pBuf := PByte(Buf);
  repeat
    pBuf^ := PByte(Tab)[pBuf^];
    Inc(pBuf);
    Dec(Len);
  until Len = 0;
end;

So why not just use plain Delphi code and let the compiler deal with the assembly?

share|improve this answer
1  
Or: pBuf^ := PByte(Tab)[pBuf^];, etc. AFAIK, all versions that have 64 bit compilers also allow pointer math on PByte. –  Rudy Velthuis Jul 23 '14 at 21:24
    
@RudyVelthuis: Good point. I updated the answer. –  Remy Lebeau Jul 23 '14 at 21:32

NOTE: Read the accepted answer by GJ as it contains a Pascal implementation that beats the crap out of my version (I seem to confuse the compiler by using ABSOLUTE to overcome the signature problem GJ's implementation has, which is one of the reasons why I didn't use it as the Pascal version, but even when recoded to match the signature and using explicit type casts within the routine, it was still much faster than my Pascal version, and on par with the optimized assembler version, so as stated in my own reply and all the others, use a Pascal implementation when possible, unless it is a time-critical routine called a gazillion times, and an actual benchmark shows that the ASM version is significantly faster - which (in my defense) my benchmark did show.

{$IFDEF MSWINDOWS }
PROCEDURE ExecuteAsm(Tab,Buf : POINTER ; Len : DWORD); ASSEMBLER; Register;
  //      32-bit     EAX EDX             ECX
  //      64-bit     RCX RDX             R8
  ASM
    {$IFDEF CPUX64 }
        XCHG    R8,RCX
        JECXZ   @OUT
        XOR     RAX,RAX
    @LOOP:
        MOV     AL,[RDX]
        MOV     AL,[R8+RAX]
        MOV     [RDX],AL
        INC     RDX
        DEC     ECX
        JNZ     @LOOP
        // LOOP @LOOP
    {$ELSE }
        JECXZ   @OUT
        PUSH    EBX
        XCHG    EAX,EBX
        XOR     EAX,EAX
    @LOOP:
        MOV     AL,[EDX+ECX-1]
        MOV     AL,[EBX+EAX]
        MOV     [EDX+ECX-1],AL
        DEC     ECX
        JNZ     @LOOP
        // LOOP @LOOP
        POP     EBX
    {$ENDIF }
    @OUT:
  END;
{$ELSE }
PROCEDURE ExecuteAsm(Tab,Buf : POINTER ; Len : DWORD);
  VAR
    TabP    : PByte ABSOLUTE Tab;
    BufP    : PByte ABSOLUTE Buf;
    I       : Cardinal;

  BEGIN
    FOR I:=1 TO Len DO BEGIN
      BufP^:=TabP[BufP^];
      INC(BufP)
    END
  END;
{$ENDIF }

This should be a valid substitution for all currently supported compilers and platforms. While I agree that it might be better to use the pure Pascal version, it does lead to some horrendous assembly code with lots of unnecessary reloading of registers (at least in 32-bit), so the pure assembly version is definitely faster.

However, unless you run it like a gazillion times, you probably won't notice it in actual use, and the pure Pascal routine will most likely perform adequately. However, only you can determine if the speed improvement is necessary.

Anyway, here are the timings for executing the PROCEDURE 100.000 times on a 256 byte array (using XE5):

32-bit ASM: 47 ms
64-bit ASM: 47 ms
32-bit PAS: 63 ms
64-bit PAS: 78 ms

and the timings for running it 10.000.000 times in RELEASE configuration:

32-bit ASM: 5281 ms
64-bit ASM: 5281 ms
32-bit PAS: 7765 ms
64-bit PAS: 10031 ms

Still, however, the ASM version beats out the Pascal version in all cases...

And the hand-optimized assembly version performed even better:

32-bit ASM: 1906 ms
64-bit ASM: 1859 ms
32-bit PAS: 7781 ms
64-bit PAS: 10015 ms

And with 10.000 times 25.600 bytes instead:

32-bit ASM: 218 ms
64-bit ASM: 172 ms
32-bit PAS: 734 ms
64-bit PAS: 937 ms

In ALL cases, my ASM routine beats the crap out of the compiler's. I simply can't reproduce your timings... What code and compiler did you use?

The actual code that computes the time is as follows (for the 10.000 times 25.600 bytes):

T:=GetTickCount;
FOR I:=1 TO 10000 DO ExecuteAsm(TAB,BUF,25600);
T:=GetTickCount-T;
share|improve this answer
2  
You did not publish the benchmark. You just published the code under test. You do need to publish the code that generates those times. Because I for one cannot reproduce the results that you claim. –  David Heffernan Jul 24 '14 at 8:44
1  
OK, I see it now, your Pascal function is no good. Your use of absolute seems to be the problem. That is certainly interesting news to learn. Try using the code from GJ's answer, say. –  David Heffernan Jul 24 '14 at 8:49
1  
GJ's code is invalid - it has a modified parameter list. While this may be acceptable in the particular instance, it is not a valid routine for timing comparisons. Anyway - even if I changed his code to match the proper signature, the Pascal version performed on par with the ASM version (couldn't reproduce your 60% faster, though, at least not with my optimized assembler version). –  HeartWare Jul 24 '14 at 9:03
1  
You should consider the absolute keyword deprecated. Most of the time nowadays, it is possible to write code clearer without using it. –  LU RD Jul 24 '14 at 9:11
2  
If you must use the original Pointer parameter list fine. Just cast inside the function. The code emitted by the compiler is identical. Your asm code is really very much slower than the Pascal code. I cannot understand why you persist with the belief that the asm code in your answer can keep up with the code produced by the compiler from Pascal source. It cannot. –  David Heffernan Jul 24 '14 at 9:26

Absolutely not sure that it will work correctly but it compiles successfully:

procedure ExecuteAsm(Tab, Buf: Pointer; Len: DWORD);
asm
     mov   rbx, Tab
     mov   ecx, Len
     mov   rdx, Buf
@1:  mov   al,  [rdx]
     xlat
     mov   [rdx], al
     inc   rdx
     dec   ecx
     jnz @1
end;

Is it the correct answer?

share|improve this answer
    
Be advised though, if this does solve your issue, you will presumably want to add conditionals to encapsulate both 32bit and 64bit code –  Jerry Dodge Jul 23 '14 at 20:15
    
Thanks, Jerry, already done it. –  Altaveron Jul 23 '14 at 20:18
    
FWIW, mov rdx,Buf is unnecessary, as RDX already contains Buf. I generally avoid parameter names and do: MOV RBX,RCX; MOV ECX,R8D;, etc. This shows me that I won't overwrite registers containing parameters and it shows me when instructions are unnecessary. –  Rudy Velthuis Jul 23 '14 at 21:30
1  
@PhiS: Sure, but XLAT relies on RBX as table base. So the xlat would have to be coded as XOR RAX,RAX; ... MOV AL,BYTE PTR [RDX]; MOV AL,[R9+RAX];, etc. –  Rudy Velthuis Jul 23 '14 at 21:46
1  
Asking "Is this the correct answer?" means that what you've posted isn't an answer, but a question. Please don't post anything in the area titled "Your Answer" that isn't intended to be an actual answer to the question. If you're not sure, it's not. –  Ken White Jul 23 '14 at 21:51

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