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I would like to configure logback to do the following.

  • Log to a file
  • Roll the file when it reaches 50MB
  • Only keep 7 days worth of logs
  • On startup always generate a new file (do a roll)

I have it all working except for the last item, startup roll. Does anyone know how to achieve that? Here's the config...

  <appender name="File" class="ch.qos.logback.core.rolling.RollingFileAppender">

    <layout class="ch.qos.logback.classic.PatternLayout">
      <Pattern>%d{HH:mm:ss.SSS} [%thread] %-5level %logger{36} - %msg \(%file:%line\)%n</Pattern>
    </layout>

    <File>server.log</File>

    <rollingPolicy class="ch.qos.logback.core.rolling.TimeBasedRollingPolicy">
      <FileNamePattern>server.%d{yyyy-MM-dd}.log</FileNamePattern>
      <!-- keep 7 days' worth of history -->
      <MaxHistory>7</MaxHistory>

      <TimeBasedFileNamingAndTriggeringPolicy class="ch.qos.logback.core.rolling.SizeAndTimeBasedFNATP">
        <MaxFileSize>50MB</MaxFileSize>
      </TimeBasedFileNamingAndTriggeringPolicy>

    </rollingPolicy>
  </appender>
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6 Answers 6

None of the other suggestions was appropriate for my situation. I didn't want to use a size-and-time-based solution, because it requires configuring a MaxFileSize, and we are using a strictly time-based policy. Here is how I accomplished rolling the file on startup with a TimeBasedRollingPolicy:

@NoAutoStart
public class StartupTimeBasedTriggeringPolicy<E> 
        extends DefaultTimeBasedFileNamingAndTriggeringPolicy<E> {

    @Override
    public void start() {
        super.start();
        nextCheck = 0L;
        isTriggeringEvent(null, null);
        try {
            tbrp.rollover();
        } catch (RolloverFailure e) {
            //Do nothing
        }
    }

}

The trick is to set the nextCheck time to 0L, so that isTriggeringEvent() will think it's time to roll the log file over. It will thus execute the code necessary to calculate the filename, as well as conveniently resetting the nextCheck time value. The subsequent call to rollover() causes the log file to be rolled. Since this only happens at startup, it is a more optimal solution than the ones that perform a comparison inside isTriggerEvent(). However small that comparison, it still degrades performance slightly when executed on every log message. This also forces the rollover to occur immediately at startup, instead of waiting for the first log event.

The @NoAutoStart annotation is important to prevent Joran from executing the start() method before all the other initialisation is complete. Otherwise, you get a NullPointerException.

Here is the config:

  <!-- Daily rollover appender that also appends timestamp and rolls over on startup -->
  <appender name="startupDailyRolloverAppender" class="ch.qos.logback.core.rolling.RollingFileAppender">
    <file>${LOG_FILE}</file>
    <rollingPolicy class="ch.qos.logback.core.rolling.TimeBasedRollingPolicy">
      <fileNamePattern>${LOG_FILE}.%d{yyyyMMdd}_%d{HHmmss,aux}</fileNamePattern>
      <TimeBasedFileNamingAndTriggeringPolicy class="my.package.StartupTimeBasedTriggeringPolicy" />
    </rollingPolicy>
    <encoder>
      <pattern>%d{HH:mm:ss.SSS} [%thread] %-5level %logger{36} - %msg%n</pattern>
    </encoder>
  </appender> 

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
I was struggling and this is exactly what I want, thanks! IMO this should be a standard feature and to config is a bit unintuitive –  vincentlcy Nov 22 '12 at 11:32
    
Thanks for the solution - I agree with @vincentlcy and also think this should be a standard feature. –  dcompiled Aug 5 '13 at 16:24
    
Just want to add my thanks for a great solution. I want to add this only works (Logback 1.0.13) if you have defined a raw filename: <file>event.txt</file> If you exclude this from your config so that you only get .0,.1,.2,etc indexed files (this is actually recommended by the Logback documentation for Windows platforms to avoid encountering file lock/rename issues) then this solution unfortunately won't actually perform a rollover because in TimeBasedRollingPolicy.rollover() the call to getParentsRawFileProperty() returns null. –  Mykro Aug 16 '13 at 1:48
    
This seems to break the cleanHistoryOnStart. I used this technique for a short running tool to generate a separate log file for every run, and notice that the configured maxHistory is not working. Could this be some race condition? –  haridsv Jun 4 at 7:59
    
Since my requirement is for a command-line tool, I don't need time based triggering at all, so I was able to get it working by switching to FixedWindowRollingPolicy and a custom TriggeringPolicy class with an isTriggering method that returns true only once. –  haridsv Jun 4 at 10:07

It works for me, using the following class as timeBasedFileNamingAndTriggeringPolicy :

import java.io.File;
import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicBoolean;

import ch.qos.logback.core.joran.spi.NoAutoStart;
import ch.qos.logback.core.rolling.SizeAndTimeBasedFNATP;

@NoAutoStart
public class Trigger<E> extends SizeAndTimeBasedFNATP<E>
{
    private final AtomicBoolean trigger = new AtomicBoolean();

    public boolean isTriggeringEvent(final File activeFile, final E event) {
        if (trigger.compareAndSet(false, true) && activeFile.length() > 0) {
            String maxFileSize = getMaxFileSize();
            setMaxFileSize("1");
            super.isTriggeringEvent(activeFile, event);
            setMaxFileSize(maxFileSize);
            return true;
        }
        return super.isTriggeringEvent(activeFile, event);
    }
}
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Overriding the isTriggeringEvent() method in ch.qos.logback.core.rolling.SizeAndTimeBasedFNATP should work nicely. Just return 'true' the first time isTriggeringEvent() method is called.

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is there a way of rolling-over on startup - without the need for a triggering-event? I have a fileappender for error-messages only. I want the error-logfile to be empty after each startup - where usually no error occurs. –  Gerhard Presser Aug 31 '12 at 12:56
    
Can I ask, what is the purpose of fiddling with maxFileSize? –  Mykro Aug 13 '13 at 4:48

I got the following to work (combining ideas from previous answers). Note I was dealing with size-based files, not time-based, but I am guessing the same solution works.

public class StartupSizeBasedTriggeringPolicy<E> extends ch.qos.logback.core.rolling.SizeBasedTriggeringPolicy<E> {

private final AtomicReference<Boolean> isFirstTime = new AtomicReference<Boolean>(true);

@Override
public boolean isTriggeringEvent(final File activeFile, final E event) {

    //this method appears to have side-effects so always call
    boolean result = super.isTriggeringEvent(activeFile, event);

    return isFirstTime.compareAndSet(true, false) || result;
}

}

share|improve this answer

Ceki's solution doesn't appear to work for me, but seems to be part way there at least.

It blows up because it can't see the rolling policy when starting the TimeBasedFileNamingAndTriggeringPolicyBase. With some hackery I got it to do some logging, and with some more I got it to observe the trigger, but then it broke again because it couldn't resolve one of the filename properties... The package is a logback one so I could get to some of the internals, to replicate some of the logic in SizeAndTimeBasedFNATP#isTriggeringEvent and call computeCurrentPeriodsHighestCounterValue. I think something along those lines might work, just haven't found the magic combination yet. I really hope I'm doing something silly, because otherwise I think it will mean either opening up some of the details for subclassing, or putting this straight into logback as another rolling/triggering policy.

logback.xml: tried various orderings of triggeringPolicy, TimeBasedFileNamingAndTriggeringPolicy inside and outside the rollingPolicy.

<appender name="FILE" class="ch.qos.logback.core.rolling.RollingFileAppender">
    <file>${LOG_DIR}/${LOG_FILE_BASE}.log</file>
    <rollingPolicy class="ch.qos.logback.core.rolling.TimeBasedRollingPolicy">
        <fileNamePattern>${LOG_DIR}/${LOG_FILE_BASE}.%d{yyyy-MM-dd}.%i.log</fileNamePattern>
        <MaxHistory>7</MaxHistory>

        <TimeBasedFileNamingAndTriggeringPolicy class="ch.qos.logback.core.rolling.RollOnStartupPolicy" />
    </rollingPolicy>

    <filter class="ch.qos.logback.classic.filter.ThresholdFilter">
        <level>INFO</level>
    </filter>

    <encoder>
        <pattern>%msg%n</pattern>
    </encoder>
</appender>

The trigger policy:

package ch.qos.logback.core.rolling;
public class RollOnStartupPolicy<E> extends SizeAndTimeBasedFNATP<E> {
private final AtomicBoolean firstTime = new AtomicBoolean(true);

    @Override
    public boolean isTriggeringEvent(File activeFile, E event) {
        if (!firstTime.get()) { // fast path
            return false;
        }

        if (firstTime.getAndSet(false)) {
            return true;
        }
        return false;
    }
}

The exception:

java.lang.NullPointerException
at  at ch.qos.logback.core.rolling.TimeBasedFileNamingAndTriggeringPolicyBase.start(TimeBasedFileNamingAndTriggeringPolicyBase.java:46)
at  at ch.qos.logback.core.rolling.SizeAndTimeBasedFNATP.start(SizeAndTimeBasedFNATP.java:36)
at  at ch.qos.logback.core.joran... [snip joran config]
share|improve this answer

Create your own subclass of ch.qos.logback.core.rolling.TimeBasedRollingPolicy and override its start

public class MyPolicy
    extends ch.qos.logback.core.rolling.TimeBasedRollingPolicy
{

    public void start ( )
    {
        super.start( );
        rollover( );
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Sadly this doesn't work because the triggering policy returns null from getElapsedPeriodsFileName() which then blows up the rollover(). –  Mike Q Mar 22 '10 at 14:13

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