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I want to find out which tables have been modified in the last hour in a MySQL database. How can I do this?

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1  
Do your tables have a timestamp column when data was changed? –  TomTom Mar 22 '10 at 12:13
    
I think most of them, if not all, have a "created" field. I am not sure if that answers your question; the database is from a website which I did not develop but have to mantain, so I am a little lost. –  agente_secreto Mar 22 '10 at 12:21
    
can you describe the usecase? there might be a better solution to what you want to achieve –  neal aise Jul 5 '10 at 15:58
    
To clarify the bounty: the UPDATE_TIME feature / trick needs to work on an extant InnoDB database that we have read access to, not one that we are starting from scratch. Therefore triggers or simply adding an updated field are not feasible. –  dotancohen Jun 23 '13 at 5:16
    
@dotancohen Are you using innodb_file_per_table ? –  RolandoMySQLDBA Jun 24 '13 at 19:59

5 Answers 5

up vote 34 down vote accepted

MySQL 5.x can do this via the INFORMATION_SCHEMA database. This database contains information about tables, views, columns, etc.

SELECT * FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES
WHERE DATE_SUB(NOW(), INTERVAL 1 HOUR) < UPDATE_TIME

Returns all tables that have been updated (UPDATE_TIME) in the last hour. You can also filter by database name (TABLE_SCHEMA column).

An example query:

SELECT CONCAT(TABLE_SCHEMA, '.', TABLE_NAME) AS Table, UPDATE_TIME AS Updated
FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES
WHERE
    DATE_SUB(NOW(), INTERVAL 3 DAY) < UPDATE_TIME
    AND TABLE_SCHEMA != 'INFORMATION_SCHEMA'
    AND TABLE_TYPE = 'BASE TABLE';
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Thank you! That does exactly what I needed –  agente_secreto Mar 22 '10 at 12:28
    
+1, nice way to do it. –  David V. Mar 22 '10 at 12:51
10  
Be aware that this approach only works for MyISAM tables, not InnoDB. –  Ike Walker Mar 22 '10 at 20:23
    
For InnoDB I'm hard-pressed to find an alternative. Maybe triggers on insert and delete operations. –  rjh Jan 25 '13 at 11:07

For each table you want to detect change, you need to have a column that holds the last change's timestamp.

For every insert or update in the table, you need to update that column with the current date and time.

Alternatively, you can set up a trigger which updates the column automatically on each insert or modify. That way you don't have to modify all of your querie.

Once this works, to find out if rows from a table have been modified in the last hour, perform the query

select count(*) from mytable where datemod>subtime(now(),'1:0:0')

repeat for every table you want to check.

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InnoDB still currently lacks a native mechanism to retreive this information. In the related feature request at MySQL, someone advises to set AFTER [all events] triggers on each table to be monitored. The trigger would issue a statement such as

INSERT INTO last_update VALUE ('current_table_name', NOW())
ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE update_time = NOW();

in a table like this:

CREATE TABLE last_update (
    table_name VARCHAR(64) PRIMARY KEY,
    update_time DATETIME
) ENGINE = MyISAM; -- no need for transactions here

Alternatively, if a slight inaccuracy in this data (in the range of one second) is acceptable, and if you have read access to the MySQL data files, you could switch to a setting where inndb_files_per_table = ON (recommended in any case) and check the last modification time of the underlying data files.

These files are found under /var/lib/mysql/[database_name]/*.ibd in most default installations.

Please note, if you decide to take this route, you need to recreate existing tables for the new setting to apply.

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I have answered a question like this in the DBA StackExchange about 1.5 years ago: Fastest way to check if InnoDB table has changed.

Based on that old answer, I recommend the following

Flushing Writes to Disk

This is a one-time setup. You need to set innodb_max_dirty_pages_pct to 0.

First, add this to /etc/my.cnf

[mysqld]
innodb_max_dirty_pages_pct=0

Then, run this to avoid having to restart mysql:

mysql> SET GLOBAL innodb_max_dirty_pages_pct = 0;

Get Timestamp of InnoDB table's .ibd file

ls has the option to retrieve the UNIX timestamp in Seconds. For an InnoDB table mydb.mytable

$ cd /var/lib/mysql/mydb
$ ls -l --time-style="+%s" mytable.ibd | awk '{print $6}'

You can then compute UNIX_TIMESTAMP(NOW()) - (timestamp of the .ibd file) and see if it is 3600 or less.

Give it a Try !!!

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Thank you Rolando! This was very helpful and informative. –  dotancohen Jun 27 '13 at 11:36
SELECT *
FROM  information_schema.tables
WHERE UPDATE_TIME >= SYSDATE() - INTERVAL 1 DAY  && TABLE_TYPE != 'SYSTEM VIEW'

SELECT * 
FROM information_schema.tables
WHERE UPDATE_TIME >= DATE_SUB(CURDATE(), INTERVAL 1 DAY) && TABLE_TYPE != 'SYSTEM VIEW'
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