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If Im trying to check an input 5 byte array (p) against a 5 byte array stored in flash (data), using the following function (e2CheckPINoverride), to simply return either a true or false value. But it seems, no matter what I try, it only returns as 'false'.

I call the function here:

if (e2CheckPINoverride(pinEntry) == 1){
  PTDD_PTDD1 = 1; 
}
else{
  PTDD_PTDD1 = 0; 
}

Here is the function:

BYTE e2CheckPINoverride(BYTE *p)
{
    BYTE i;
    BYTE data[5];

if(e2Read(E2_ENABLECODE, data, 5)) {
    if(data[0] != p[0]) return FALSE;
    if(data[1] != p[1]) return FALSE;
    if(data[2] != p[2]) return FALSE;
    if(data[3] != p[3]) return FALSE;
    if(data[4] != p[4]) return FALSE;
}
return TRUE;
}

I have already assigned true and false in the defines.h file:

#ifndef TRUE
    #define TRUE ((UCHAR)1)
#endif

#ifndef FALSE
    #define FALSE ((UCHAR)0)
#endif

and where

typedef unsigned char   UCHAR;

when i step through the code, it performs all the checks correctly, it passes in the correct value, compares it correctly and then breaks at the correct point, but is unable to process the return value of true?

please help?

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Could you please change your call into BYTE ret = e2CheckPINoverride(pinEntry); if (ret == 1) { PTDD_PTDD1 = 1; } else { PTDD_PTDD1 = 0; } and tell us the value of ret? –  Vlad Mar 22 '10 at 12:30
    
What's BYTE defined to? –  Michael Foukarakis Mar 22 '10 at 12:33
    
@Vlad - That solved it! It seems like an arbitrary change, could you explain to me, what makes the difference? So my code now looks like this ret= (e2CheckPINoverride(pinEntry)); //where ret is assigned as BYTE if (ret==1) { PTDD_PTDD1 = 1; } else{ PTDD_PTDD1 = 0; } and it works correctly, assigning '0' when false and '1' when true. thanks! –  RonnyJ Mar 22 '10 at 13:35
    
it might depend on the actual definition of BYTE. Maybe TRUE and FALSE are already defined, so your #ifdef-ed code is actually never executed? –  Vlad Mar 22 '10 at 15:12
    
you should debug it using assembly when the function returns to understand how this works and see the possible problems –  INS Apr 2 '10 at 8:54
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7 Answers

#define TRUE 1
#define FALSE 0

Forget the unsigned char. You can go with the premise that in c 0 is false everything else is true

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Probably not going to solve your problem, but you should write:

PTDD_PTDD1 = e2CheckPINoverride(pinEntry) ? 1 : 0;

Also, you are mixing BYTEs and UCHARs (even though they are probably the same)

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1  
or even just PTDD_PTDD1 = e2CheckPINoverride(pinEntry); –  David Gelhar Mar 22 '10 at 12:30
1  
@David Well technically boolean true is a non-zero value, and if PTDD_PTDD1 should be either 0 or 1, I would not trust the return value and set PTDD_PTDD1 to 0 or 1 myself. Of course, if PTDD_PTDD1 is also a boolean value, then your proposal is correct. –  Tuomas Pelkonen Mar 22 '10 at 12:32
    
Tuomas, you are making assumptions about what value the function will return in either implementation. To be correct you need to compare the returnvalue to the define: PTDD_PTDD1 = (e2CheckPINoverride(pinEntry) == TRUE ? 1 : 0); –  Yannick Motton Mar 22 '10 at 12:36
1  
@Yannick I disagree, if you know that a function is returning a boolean value (non-zero when true) then e2CheckPINoverride(pinEntry) ? 1 : 0 is the correct way to do it. –  Tuomas Pelkonen Mar 22 '10 at 12:39
    
Well, C does not have a boolean type. The function returns a BYTE (presumably an unsigned char in this context), and the value will either be the value of the TRUE or the FALSE define. Which in this case you are assuming will either be non zero, or zero. –  Yannick Motton Mar 22 '10 at 12:47
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Try narrowing this down by dispensing with the #define and just saying

return 1;

If that works, then something isn't working with your #define's.

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yeah, thx already tried to eliminate that possibility with the following: if(e2Read(E2_ENABLECODE, data, 5)) { indicator = 1; if(data[0] != p[0]){ indicator = 0; return indicator; } if(data[1] != p[1]){ indicator = 0; return indicator; } if(data[2] != p[2]){ indicator = 0; return indicator; } if(data[3] != p[3]){ indicator = 0; return indicator; } if(data[4] != p[4]){ indicator = 0; return indicator; } } return indicator; no joy :( –  RonnyJ Mar 22 '10 at 13:01
    
sorry thats a mess. im new to this forum, to create a code block, it says indent by at least four spaces? or a tab? doesnt seem to be doin the trick? –  RonnyJ Mar 22 '10 at 13:05
    
To add a code block in comments use backticks to surround it (however keep in mind that comments are single line). But I suggest you elaborate further in your question. –  Yannick Motton Mar 22 '10 at 13:07
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If you return TRUE or FALSE, you should also check for them. Rewrite the if clause like this:

   if (e2CheckPINoverride(pinEntry) == TRUE) { // instead of '== 1'
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1  
This is a really poor idea, IMO. In C, any and all non-zero values are true, so you should either use if (xxx != 0) or just if (xxx), never an explicit comparison to any other value. –  Jerry Coffin Mar 22 '10 at 14:17
    
@Jerry - except here he is defining a macro TRUE==1, 'true' it would be wrong if he were testing the return value of the function. –  Martin Beckett Mar 22 '10 at 14:34
    
@Martin: I have to disagree. Defining "TRUE" is perfectly fine, but should always be treated as a write-only value -- i.e. it's fine to set something to TRUE, but you still shouldn't compare against it. –  Jerry Coffin Mar 22 '10 at 15:09
    
Yes, comparing to 'true' is bad. But here TRUE is a token he is defining in both the return and the test. It could be equal to "yellow cupcakes" and it would still make sense. Of course as soon as somebody comes in and adds a function that returns 'true' all bets are off. –  Martin Beckett Mar 22 '10 at 15:38
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IMO, you're creating a great deal of unnecessary complexity. I'd write the function something like this:

int e2CheckPINoverride(BYTE *p) {
    BYTE data[5];

    return e2Read(E2_ENABLECODE, data, 5) && 
        data[0] == p[0] &&
        data[1] == p[1] &&
        data[2] == p[2] &&
        data[3] == p[3] &&
        data[4] == p[4];
}

And the calling code becomes simply:

PTDD_PTDD1 = e2CheckPINoverride(pinEntry);
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Just a small example that I tested to work. I dont know the content of e2Read so I made just a dummy

#ifndef UCHAR
    typedef unsigned char   UCHAR;
#endif
#ifndef BYTE
    typedef  char   BYTE;
#endif
#ifndef TRUE
    #define TRUE ((UCHAR)1)
#endif
#ifndef FALSE
    #define FALSE ((UCHAR)0)
#endif
int e2Read(int myconst, BYTE* data, int num)
{
    int i;
    for(i=0;i<num;i++)
        *(data++) = 0; // You can change thisone to test different results.
    return 1;
}
BYTE e2CheckPINoverride(BYTE *p)
{
#define E2_ENABLECODE 3
    BYTE data[5];
    if(e2Read(E2_ENABLECODE, data, 5)) {
    if(data[0] != p[0]) return FALSE;
    if(data[1] != p[1]) return FALSE;
    if(data[2] != p[2]) return FALSE;
    if(data[3] != p[3]) return FALSE;
    if(data[4] != p[4]) return FALSE;
    }
    return TRUE;
}
int main(void)
{
    BYTE b[5] = {0,0,0,0,0};// You can change thisone to test different results.
    BYTE* pinEntry = b;
    if (e2CheckPINoverride(pinEntry) == 1){
        printf("Returned true\n");
    }
    else{
        printf("Returned false\n");
    }
    return 0;
}
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Your data array is never initialised so it has random values inside.

BYTE data[5];

So, you are comparing the elements from array p with random values from array data. It will return almost always FALSE.

Conclusion: Fill the data array with meaningful data.

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e2Read() probably does that part. Reads something into data. Maybe. –  Michael Foukarakis Mar 22 '10 at 12:43
    
yup. here is e2Read() 'BYTE e2Read(BYTE address, BYTE *data, BYTE len) { BYTE n; for(n = 0; n < len; n++) *data++ = E2DATA[address + n]; return TRUE; }' –  RonnyJ Mar 22 '10 at 13:11
    
Yes. I see that now. Sorry. Will be more careful next time. –  kaciula Mar 22 '10 at 14:07
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