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What would be considered the best practices when executing queries on an SQLite db within an Android app?

Is it safe to run inserts, deletes and select queries from an AsyncTask's doInBackground ? Or should I use the UI Thread ? I suppose that db queries can be "heavy" and should not use the UI thread as it can lock up the app - resulting in an ANR.

If I have several AsyncTasks, should they share a connection or should they open a connection each?

Are there any best practices for these scenarios?

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5  
Whatever you do, remember to sanitize your inputs if your content provider (or SQLite interface) is publicly facing! –  Kristopher Micinski Jun 22 '12 at 19:38
8  
You definitely should NOT be doing db accesses from the UI thread, I can tell you that much. –  Edward Falk Jan 16 '13 at 20:13

6 Answers 6

up vote 279 down vote accepted

Inserts, updates, deletes and reads are generally OK from multiple threads, but Brad's answer is not correct. You have to be careful with how you create your connections and use them. There are situations where your update calls will fail, even if your database doesn't get corrupted.

The basic answer.

The SqliteOpenHelper object holds on to one database connection. It appears to offer you a read and write connection, but it really doesn't. Call the read-only, and you'll get the write database connection regardless.

So, one helper instance, one db connection. Even if you use it from multiple threads, one connection at a time. The SqliteDatabase object uses java locks to keep access serialized. So, if 100 threads have one db instance, calls to the actual on-disk database are serialized.

So, one helper, one db connection, which is serialized in java code. One thread, 1000 threads, if you use one helper instance shared between them, all of your db access code is serial. And life is good (ish).

If you try to write to the database from actual distinct connections at the same time, one will fail. It will not wait till the first is done and then write. It will simply not write your change. Worse, if you don’t call the right version of insert/update on the SQLiteDatabase, you won’t get an exception. You’ll just get a message in your LogCat, and that will be it.

So, multiple threads? Use one helper. Period. If you KNOW only one thread will be writing, you MAY be able to use multiple connections, and your reads will be faster, but buyer beware. I haven't tested that much.

Here's a blog post with far more detail and an example app.

Gray and I are actually wrapping up an ORM tool, based off of his Ormlite, that works natively with Android database implementations, and follows the safe creation/calling structure I describe in the blog post. That should be out very soon. Take a look.


In the meantime, there is a follow up blog post:

Also checkout the fork by 2point0 of the previously mentioned locking example:

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2  
As an aside, Ormlite's android support can be found at ormlite.sourceforge.net/sqlite_java_android_orm.html. There are sample projects, documentation, and jars. –  Gray Oct 20 '10 at 15:37
1  
A second aside. The ormlite code has helper classes that can be used to manage dbhelper instances. You can use the ormlite stuff, but its not required. You can use the helper classes just to do connection management. –  Kevin Galligan Nov 7 '10 at 21:44
12  
Kāgii, thank you for the detailed explanation. Could you clarify one thing -- I understand you should have ONE helper, but should you also only have one connection (i.e. one SqliteDatabase object)? In other words, how often should you call getWritableDatabase? And equally importantly when do you call close()? –  Artem Apr 8 '11 at 12:51
3  
I updated the code. The original was lost when I switched blog hosts, but I added some slimmed down example code that will demonstrate the issue. Also, how do you manage the single connection? I had a much more complicated solution initially, but I've since amended that. Take a look here: touchlab.co/uncategorized/single-sqlite-connection –  Kevin Galligan Oct 15 '11 at 17:46
1  
Thanks for updating link. Moved the website, totally forgot ;) –  Kevin Galligan Jun 19 '12 at 1:43

Same article on Github (I like formatting more)

Concurrent Database Access

I wrote small article which describe how to make access to your android database thread safe.


Assuming you have your own SQLiteOpenHelper.

public class DatabaseHelper extends SQLiteOpenHelper { ... }

Now you want to write data to database in separate threads.

 // Thread 1
 Context context = getApplicationContext();
 DatabaseHelper helper = new DatabaseHelper(context);
 SQLiteDatabase database = helper.getWritableDatabase();
 database.insert(…);
 database.close();

 // Thread 2
 Context context = getApplicationContext();
 DatabaseHelper helper = new DatabaseHelper(context);
 SQLiteDatabase database = helper.getWritableDatabase();
 database.insert(…);
 database.close();

You will get following message in your logcat and one of your changes will not be written.

android.database.sqlite.SQLiteDatabaseLockedException: database is locked (code 5)

This is happening because every time you create new SQLiteOpenHelper object you are actually making new database connection. If you try to write to the database from actual distinct connections at the same time, one will fail. (from answer above)

To use database with multiple threads we need to make sure we are using one database connection.

Let’s make singleton class Database Manager which will hold and return single SQLiteOpenHelper object.

public class DatabaseManager {

    private static DatabaseManager instance;
    private static SQLiteOpenHelper mDatabaseHelper;

    public static synchronized void initialize(Context context, SQLiteOpenHelper helper) {
        if (instance == null) {
            instance = new DatabaseManager();
            mDatabaseHelper = helper;
        }
    }

    public static synchronized DatabaseManager getInstance() {
        if (instance == null) {
            throw new IllegalStateException(DatabaseManager.class.getSimpleName() +
                    " is not initialized, call initialize(..) method first.");
        }

        return instance;
    }

    public SQLiteDatabase getDatabase() {
        return new mDatabaseHelper.getWritableDatabase();
    }

}

Updated code which write data to database in separate threads will look like this.

 // In your application class
 DatabaseManager.initializeInstance(getApplicationContext());
 // Thread 1
 DatabaseManager manager = DatabaseManager.getInstance();
 SQLiteDatabase database = manager.getDatabase()
 database.insert(…);
 database.close();

 // Thread 2
 DatabaseManager manager = DatabaseManager.getInstance();
 SQLiteDatabase database = manager.getDatabase()
 database.insert(…);
 database.close();

This will bring you another crash.

java.lang.IllegalStateException: attempt to re-open an already-closed object: SQLiteDatabase

Since we are using only one database connection, method getDatabase() return same instance of SQLiteDatabase object for Thread1 and Thread2. What is happening, Thread1 may close database, while Thread2 is still using it. That’s why we have IllegalStateException crash.

We need to make sure no-one is using database and only then close it. Some folks on stackoveflow recommended to never close your SQLiteDatabase. It not only sounds stupid but also honor you with following logcat message.

Leak found
Caused by: java.lang.IllegalStateException: SQLiteDatabase created and never closed

Working sample

public class DatabaseManager {

    private int mOpenCounter;

    private static DatabaseManager instance;
    private static SQLiteOpenHelper mDatabaseHelper;
    private SQLiteDatabase mDatabase;

    public static synchronized void initializeInstance(SQLiteOpenHelper helper) {
        if (instance == null) {
            instance = new DatabaseManager();
            mDatabaseHelper = helper;
        }
    }

    public static synchronized DatabaseManager getInstance() {
        if (instance == null) {
            throw new IllegalStateException(DatabaseManager.class.getSimpleName() +
                    " is not initialized, call initializeInstance(..) method first.");
        }

        return instance;
    }

    public synchronized SQLiteDatabase openDatabase() {
        mOpenCounter++;
        if(mOpenCounter == 1) {
            // Opening new database
            mDatabase = mDatabaseHelper.getWritableDatabase();
        }
        return mDatabase;
    }

    public synchronized void closeDatabase() {
        mOpenCounter--;
        if(mOpenCounter == 0) {
            // Closing database
            mDatabase.close();

        }
    }

}

Use it as follows.

SQLiteDatabase database = DatabaseManager.getInstance().openDatabase();
database.insert(...);
// database.close(); Don't close it directly!
DatabaseManager.getInstance().closeDatabase(); // correct way

Every time you need database you should call openDatabase() method of DatabaseManager class. Inside this method, we have a counter, which indicate how many times database is opened. If it equals to one, it means we need to create new database, if not, database is already created.

The same happens in closeDatabase() method. Every time we call this method, counter is decreased, whenever it goes to zero, we are closing database.


Now you should be able to use your database and be sure it's thread safe.

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1  
getWritableDatabase, if a new db created, the reference is 1 by default. so, you may get the database never closed, as acquireReference add 1 no matter this db is cached or new created. So I doubt this answer. –  virsir Nov 23 '13 at 11:23
    
@virsir you are correct! I just updated my answer. Thank you! –  Dmytro Danylyk Nov 23 '13 at 19:42
    
What do I do if the database is used by activites and SyncService which is running in its separate process ? <service android:name=".SyncService" android:exported="true" android:process=":sync"> If I understand correctly, the class loader for a separate process is different than for activites, so your approach won't work here ? –  ievgen Mar 30 at 6:05
    
@ievgen DatabaseManager is thread safe singleton, so it could be used anywhere. Just don't forget to initialize it first time in your Application class - DatabaseManager.initializeInstance(getApplicationContext()); –  Dmytro Danylyk Mar 30 at 17:25
1  
More thoughts. #1, I'd create the helper inside your manager. Asking for problems to have it outside. New dev might call the helper directly for some crazy reason. Also, if you're going to require an init method, throw an exception if instance already exists. Multi-db apps will obviously fail as is. #2, why the mDatabase field? Its available from helper. #3, as your first step towards "never close", what happens to your db when your app crashes and isn't "closed"? Hint, nothing. Its fine, because SQLite is super stable. That was step 1 in figuring out why you don't need to close it. –  Kevin Galligan Jun 1 at 20:38

The Database is very flexible with multi-threading. My apps hit their DBs from many different threads simultaneously and it does just fine. In some cases I have multiple processes hitting the DB simultaneously and that works fine too.

Your async tasks - use the same connection when you can, but if you have to, its OK to access the DB from different tasks.

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Also, do you have readers and writers in different connections or should they share a single connection? Thanks. –  Gray Aug 31 '10 at 2:00
    
@Gray - correct, I should have mentioned that explicitly. As far as connections, I would use the same connection as much as possible, but since the locking is handled at the filesystem level, you can open it multiple times in the code, but I would use a single connection as much as possible. The Android sqlite DB is very flexible and forgiving. –  Brad Hein Aug 31 '10 at 14:08
2  
@Gray, just wanted to post an updated information for people who may be using this method. Documentation says: This method now does nothing. Do not use. –  Pius Sep 16 '12 at 5:24
    
Thanks for the update @Pius. –  Gray Sep 18 '12 at 13:17
1  
I've found this method to fail horribly, we are switching to ContentProvider to access from multiple applications. We will have to do some concurrency on our methods but that should fix any issues with processes all accessing the data at the same time. –  JPM Nov 12 '12 at 19:40

My understanding of SQLiteDatabase APIs is that in case you have a multi threaded application, you cannot afford to have more than a 1 SQLiteDatabase object pointing to a single database.

The object definitely can be created but the inserts/updates fail if different threads/processes (too) start using different SQLiteDatabase objects (like how we use in JDBC Connection).

The only solution here is to stick with 1 SQLiteDatabase objects and whenever a startTransaction() is used in more than 1 thread, Android manages the locking across different threads and allows only 1 thread at a time to have exclusive update access.

Also you can do "Reads" from the database and use the same SQLiteDatabase object in a different thread (while another thread writes) and there would never be database corruption i.e "read thread" wouldn't read the data from the database till the "write thread" commits the data although both use the same SQLiteDatabase object.

This is different from how connection object is in JDBC where if you pass around (use the same) the connection object between read and write threads then we would likely be printing uncommitted data too.

In my enterprise application, I try to use conditional checks so that the UI Thread never have to wait, while the BG thread holds the SQLiteDatabase object (exclusively). I try to predict UI Actions and defer BG thread from running for 'x' seconds. Also one can maintain PriorityQueue to manage handing out SQLiteDatabase Connection objects so that the UI Thread gets it first.

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And what do you put into that PriorityQueue - listeners (that want to get database object) or SQL queries? –  Pius Sep 18 '12 at 15:53
    
I haven't use the priority queue approach, but essentially the "caller" threads. –  Swaroop Nov 9 '12 at 6:20

after struggling with this for a couple of hours, I've found that you can only use one db helper object per db execution. For example,

for(int x = 0; x < someMaxValue; x++)
{
    db = new DBAdapter(this);
    try
    {

        db.addRow
        (
                NamesStringArray[i].toString(), 
                StartTimeStringArray[i].toString(),
                EndTimeStringArray[i].toString()
        );

    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
        Log.e("Add Error", e.toString());
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    db.close();
}

as apposed to:

db = new DBAdapter(this);
for(int x = 0; x < someMaxValue; x++)
{

    try
    {
        // ask the database manager to add a row given the two strings
        db.addRow
        (
                NamesStringArray[i].toString(), 
                StartTimeStringArray[i].toString(),
                EndTimeStringArray[i].toString()
        );

    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
        Log.e("Add Error", e.toString());
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

}
db.close();

creating a new DBAdapter each time the loop iterates was the only way I could get my strings into a database through my helper class.

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Dmytro's answer works fine for my case. I think it's better to declare the function as synchronized. at least for my case, it would invoke null pointer exception otherwise, e.g. getWritableDatabase not yet returned in one thread and openDatabse called in another thread meantime.

public synchronized SQLiteDatabase openDatabase() {
        if(mOpenCounter.incrementAndGet() == 1) {
            // Opening new database
            mDatabase = mDatabaseHelper.getWritableDatabase();
        }
        return mDatabase;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
You are right, I have updated my answer. Thanks. –  Dmytro Danylyk Feb 8 at 18:58
    
mDatabaseHelper.getWritableDatabase(); This won't create new database object –  outlying May 30 at 5:33

protected by Luksprog Feb 9 at 9:50

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