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Basically the questions in the title. I'm looking at the MVC 2 source code:

[Flags]
public enum HttpVerbs {
    Get = 1 << 0,
    Post = 1 << 1,
    Put = 1 << 2,
    Delete = 1 << 3,
    Head = 1 << 4
}

and I'm just curious as to what the double left angle brackers << does.

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14 Answers 14

up vote 54 down vote accepted

That would be the bitwise left shift operator.

For each shift left, the value is effectively multiplied by 2. So, for example, writing value << 3 will multiply the value by 8.

What it really does internally is move all of the actual bits of the value left one place. So if you have the value 12 (decimal), in binary that is 00001100; shifting it left one place will turn that into 00011000, or 24.

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When you write

1 << n

You shift the bit combination 000000001 for n times left and thus put n into the exponent of 2:

2^n

So

1 << 10

Really is

1024

For a list of say 5 items your for will cycle 32 times.

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8  
@Robert Fricke: Yes. Bit shifting is limited to a base of 2 (disadvantage) but extremely faster (advantage) than Math.Pow() which is more flexible and can even have floating point bases and exponents. It becomes a single machine code instruction. –  pid Jan 29 '14 at 10:50
29  
@IlyaIvanov Haha, yes. And also how your employer never can let you go anymore: your code is lightning fast, and the other developers can't understand it. –  Robert Fricke Jan 29 '14 at 10:55
7  
I find it hard to believe performance is such a premium that it would not make more sense to Math.Pow once to find the loop count. Then you don't have to worry about tripping up developers with shifting nonsense. –  Gusdor Jan 29 '14 at 10:57
8  
@Ingo So OP and the 31 upvoters should flip burgers then? –  Robert Fricke Jan 29 '14 at 14:43
26  
I'm not sure why everyone sees this as an optimization. To me, it's the natural idiom for expressing power-of-two, and I would never consider writing it another way. Using a library function for performing power-of-two calculations makes it harder to read (horrible prefix notation, rather than value operator value which is much more readable). Seriously, do you really think that Convert.ToInt32(Math.Pow(2,value)) is more readable than 1<<value, now you've had the meaning of the operator explained? –  Jules Jan 29 '14 at 19:02

It is called left-shift operator. Take a look at the documentation

The left-shift operator causes the bit pattern in the first operand to be shifted to the left by the number of bits specified by the second operand. Bits vacated by the shift operation are zero-filled. This is a logical shift instead of a shift-and-rotate operation.

Simple example that demonstrates the left-shift operator:

for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
    var shiftedValue = 1 << i;
    Console.WriteLine(" 1 << {0} = {1} \t Binary: {2}",i,shiftedValue,Convert.ToString(shiftedValue,2).PadLeft(10,'0'));
}

//Output:

// 1 << 0 = 1      Binary: 0000000001
// 1 << 1 = 2      Binary: 0000000010
// 1 << 2 = 4      Binary: 0000000100
// 1 << 3 = 8      Binary: 0000001000
// 1 << 4 = 16     Binary: 0000010000
// 1 << 5 = 32     Binary: 0000100000
// 1 << 6 = 64     Binary: 0001000000
// 1 << 7 = 128    Binary: 0010000000
// 1 << 8 = 256    Binary: 0100000000
// 1 << 9 = 512    Binary: 1000000000

Moving one bit to left is equivelant to multiple by two.In fact,moving bits are faster than standart multiplication.Let's take a look at an example that demonstrates this fact:

Let's say we have two methods:

static void ShiftBits(long number,int count)
{
    long value = number;
    for (int i = 0; i < count; i+=128)
    {
          for (int j = 1; j < 65; j++)
          {
              value = value << j;
          }
          for (int j = 1; j < 65; j++)
          {
               value = value >> j;
          }
    }
}

static void MultipleAndDivide(long number, int count)
{
      long value = number;
      for (int i = 0; i < count; i += 128)
      {
            for (int j = 1; j < 65; j++)
            {
                value = value * (2 * j);
            }
            for (int j = 1; j < 65; j++)
            {
                value = value / (2 * j);
            }
      }
}

And we want to test them like this:

ShiftBits(1, 10000000);
ShiftBits(1, 100000000);
ShiftBits(1, 1000000000);
...
MultipleAndDivide(1, 10000000);
MultipleAndDivide(1, 100000000);
MultipleAndDivide(1, 1000000000);
...

Here is the results:

Bit manipulation 10.000.000 times: 58 milliseconds
Bit manipulation 100.000.000 times: 375 milliseconds
Bit manipulation 1.000.000.000 times: 4073 milliseconds

Multiplication and Division 10.000.000 times: 81 milliseconds
Multiplication and Division 100.000.000 times: 824 milliseconds
Multiplication and Division 1.000.000.000 times: 8224 milliseconds
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We tend to prefer bitwise rotations over bitwise shifts in cryptography. Shifts are used in some places, but they're not nearly as common as rotations. –  Reid Jan 29 '14 at 18:24
    
This is quite generalized. I'm uncomfortable with it to tell you the truth. I'm mostly uncomfortable with the fact that you failed to mention that it performs (value)*2^n very quickly. Also, the examples that you mention are (while true) missing the point I feel. –  jaked122 Jan 29 '14 at 18:24
2  
@jaked122 is it enough now ? :) –  Selman22 Jan 30 '14 at 4:53
    
@Selman22 Yes it is. –  jaked122 Jan 30 '14 at 20:56

It is Bitwise shift left it works by shifting digits of binary equivalent of number by the given (right hand side) numbers.

so:

temp = 14 << 2

binary equivalent of 14 is 00001110 shifting it 2 times means pushing zero from right hand side and shifting each digit to left side which make it 00111000 equals to 56.

visual

In your example:

i < (1 << list.Count)
  • 0000000001 = 1 if list.Count = 0 result is 0000000001 = 1
  • 0000000001 = 1 if list.Count = 1 result is 0000000010 = 2
  • 0000000001 = 1 if list.Count = 2 result is 0000000100 = 4
  • 0000000001 = 1 if list.Count = 3 result is 0000001000 = 8

and so on. In general it is equal 2 ^ list.Count (2 raised to the power of list.Count)

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That's the left bitshift operator. It shifts the bit pattern of the left operand to the left by the number of binary digits specified in the right operand.

Get = 1 << 0, // 1
Post = 1 << 1, // 2
Put = 1 << 2,  // 4
Delete = 1 << 3, // 8
Head = 1 << 4  // 16

This is semantically equivalent to lOperand * Math.Pow(2, rOperand)

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+1 for actually showing what the left bitshift is doing in this case. –  auujay Mar 22 '10 at 15:43
7  
Or More Specifically: 00001, 00010, 00100, 01000, 10000 –  zmbush Mar 22 '10 at 15:48
1  
"by the number of binary digits specified in the right operand" - actually, that isn't quite right; for 32-bit, for example, it only considers the first 5 bits, so << 33 is identical to << 1. Likewise in 64-bit math, << 65 is identical to << 1. And right-shift is more complex again, as you need to consider the sign to know what to backfill with. –  Marc Gravell Mar 23 '10 at 16:50

The purpose of the loop is most likely to generate or operate on all subsets of the set of items in the list. And the loop body most likely also has a good bit (har har) of bitwise operations, namely both another left-shift and bitwise-and. (So rewriting it to use Pow would be mighty stupid, I can hardly believe there were so many people that actually suggested that.)

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4  
+1 for the suggestion that this involves subsets of the list elements, which seems the only reasonable motive to do such a thing. One might want to add that this is a very bad technique if there is any chance at all that the list will be fairly long, namely longer than the number of bits in an int (one might guess that with all bits shifted away the loop would be exectuted 0 times, but in reality I think the behaviour is undefined; in fact I recall that shifting bits over exactly the word length often does nothing at all). –  Marc van Leeuwen Jan 29 '14 at 15:45

Thats bit shifting. Its basically just moving the bits to the left by adding 0's to the right side.

public enum HttpVerbs {
    Get = 1 << 0,    // 00000001 -> 00000001 = 1
    Post = 1 << 1,   // 00000001 -> 00000010 = 2
    Put = 1 << 2,    // 00000001 -> 00000100 = 4
    Delete = 1 << 3, // 00000001 -> 00001000 = 8
    Head = 1 << 4    // 00000001 -> 00010000 = 16
}

More info at http://www.blackwasp.co.uk/CSharpShiftOperators.aspx

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In addition to Selman22's answer, some examples:

I'll list some values for list.Count and what the loop would be:

list.Count == 0: for (int i = 0; i < 1; i++)
list.Count == 1: for (int i = 0; i < 2; i++)
list.Count == 2: for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++)
list.Count == 3: for (int i = 0; i < 8; i++)

And so forth.

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"Bit shift left." 1 << 0 means "take the integer value 1 and shift its bits left by zero bits." I.e., 00000001 stays unchanged. 1 << 1 means "take the integer value 1 and shift its bits left one place." 00000001 becomes 00000010.

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1  
For your first example, I think you meant "by zero bits", but the rest is correct. –  Adam Robinson Mar 22 '10 at 15:37
    
@Adam Thanks, you're absolutely right. I've updated the post. –  Dathan Mar 22 '10 at 15:39

Its (<<) a bitwise left shift operator, it moves the bit values of a binary object. The left operand specifies the value to be shifted and the right operand specifies the number of positions that the bits in the value are to be shifted.

In your case if the value of list.count is 4 then loop will run till i < (1<< 4) which is 16 (00010000)

00000001 << 4 = 00010000(16)

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The expression (1 << N) uses a Bit Shift in c#.

In this case it's being used to perform a fast integer evalution of 2^N, where n is 0 to 30.

A good tool for young whippersnappers developers that don't understand how bit shifts work is Windows Calc in programmer mode, which visualises the effect of shifts on signed numbers of various sizes. The Lsh and Rsh functions equate to << and >> respectively.

Evaluating using Math.Pow inside the loop condition is (on my system) about 7 times slower than the question code for N = 10, whether this matters depends on the context.

Caching the "loop count" in a separate variable would speed it up slightly as the expression involving the list length would not need to be re-evaluated on every iteration.

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1 << list.Count looks like it's probably loop invariant anyway, in which case a decent compiler would move it out of the loop. Given that, to some people caching it might seem like premature optimization. For me it would depend how "serious" the code is. –  hippietrail Jan 29 '14 at 18:32
    
Depending on where list comes from, it's probably very difficult for the compiler to prove that it's loop invariant: for instance, does the compiler know it can't be modified in another thread? Or that it isn't some bizarre subclass of List that removes elements when they're accessed, or something similar to that? –  Jules Jan 29 '14 at 19:27
    
What's that -31 to -2 bit? It seems especially odd because it's a 30-number range, while 0 to 30 is a 31-number range. (And shouldn't the range actually be 32 numbers, anyway?) –  Brilliand Jan 29 '14 at 20:23
    
@Brilliand sorry, I was talking nonsense, int << X is the same as int << (X-32) but a) its irrelevant and b) the negative shifts don't compute 2^(32-X)! –  Peter Wishart Jan 29 '14 at 21:41

It is implied in a number of answers but never stated directly...

For every position that you shift a binary number left, you double the original value of the number.

For example,

Decimal 5 binary shifted left by one is decimal 10, or decimal 5 doubled.

Decimal 5 binary shifted left by 3 is decimal 40, or decimal 5 doubled 3 times.

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I know this answer is pretty much solved, but I thought the visualization might help someone.

[Fact] public void Bit_shift_left()
{
    Assert.Equal(Convert.ToInt32("0001", 2), 1 << 0); // 1
    Assert.Equal(Convert.ToInt32("0010", 2), 1 << 1); // 2
    Assert.Equal(Convert.ToInt32("0100", 2), 1 << 2); // 4
    Assert.Equal(Convert.ToInt32("1000", 2), 1 << 3); // 8
}
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Previous answers have explained what it does, but nobody seems to have taken a guess as to why. It seems quite likely to me that the reason for this code is that the loop is iterating over each possible combination of members of a list -- this is the only reason I can see why you would want to iterate up to 2^{list.Count}. The variable i would therefore be badly named: instead of an index (which is what I usually interpret 'i' as meaning), its bits represent a combination of items from the list, so (for example) the first item may be selected if bit zero of i is set ((i & (1 << 0)) != 0), the second item if bit one is set ((i & (1 << 1)) != 0) and so on. 1 << list.Count is therefore the first integer that does not correspond to a valid combination of items from the list, as it would indicate selection of the non-existant list[list.Count].

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2  
That isn't the question, though, and so this isn't really an answer. –  David Conrad Jan 29 '14 at 19:38
3  
I think it is an answer. Because it puts a different light on it: it isn't just 2^list.Count: for a particularly convenient way of enumerating selections from a list, it's calculating (I suspect) the first number that doesn't correspond to a valid selection. That this happens to be 2^list.Count, but the intent is (I'm reasonably sure) to enumerate all of those combinations, so the fact that this is the number of combinations possible is incidental to the real meaning of the loop's exit condition, which is "stop counting when we've run out of combinations of list items". –  Jules Jan 29 '14 at 19:58
1  
The question is, "what (1 << list.Count) means". Yours is an answer ... to a different question than the one the OP asked. –  David Conrad Jan 29 '14 at 20:33

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