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I am trying to create a record containing the path to a file. The insertion is done into a Postgres database where UTF8 is enabled, using the NpqSQL driver.

My table definition:

CREATE TABLE images
(
    id serial,
    file_location character varying NOT NULL
)

My SQL statement including the code that executes it (boiled down to a minimum):

string sqlStatement = "INSERT INTO images (file_location) VALUES ('\\2010')";

NpgsqlConnection dbConnection = new NpgsqlConnection(connectionString);
dbConnection.Open();
NpgsqlCommand dbCommand = new NpgsqlCommand(sqlStatement , dbConnection);
int result = dbCommand.ExecuteNonQuery();
dbConnection.Close();    

When using pgAdmin to insert the above statement, it works fine. Using the NpgSQL driver through Visual Studio C#, it fails with this exception:

"ERROR: 22021: invalid byte sequence for encoding \"UTF8\": 0x81"

As Milen accurately explains, Postgres interprets the statement as an octal number (\o201 == 0x81).

As Milen also describes, the E infront of the path doesn't help.

So a quick recap: Why is NpqSQL stopping my insertion of the \\2010?

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Have you read "4.1.2.1. String Constants" and "4.1.2.2. String Constants with C-Style Escapes" from the manual (postgresql.org/docs/current/static/…)? –  Milen A. Radev Mar 22 '10 at 18:32
    
@Milen: "Any other character following a backslash is taken literally. Thus, to include a backslash character, write two backslashes (\\).". My logic tells me, that the '\\' is considered before the octal byte value '\2...'? –  Chau Mar 23 '10 at 15:05
2  
You haven't showed the real code so I suppose your interpreter/compiler interprets the double backslashes as an escaped backslash and then Postgres sees only one backslash followed by some digits. Which is it interprets as an octal number (o201,x81). –  Milen A. Radev Mar 23 '10 at 15:32
    
BTW about the "escape" string constants (strings starting with "E") - in your case they are completely unnecessary. In standard SQL backslash has no special meaning. –  Milen A. Radev Mar 23 '10 at 15:39
    
Are you using parameters? Npgsql should be handling escaped strings for your automatically. I hope it helps. –  Francisco Junior Mar 3 '13 at 20:58

2 Answers 2

(Realised my comments look like an answer so converted them accordingly.)

You haven't showed the real code so I suppose your interpreter/compiler interprets the double backslashes as an escaped backslash and then Postgres sees only one backslash followed by some digits. Which is it interprets as a octal byte value (octal 201 = hexadecimal 81).

About the "escape" string constants (strings starting with "E") - in your case they are completely unnecessary. In standard SQL backslash has no special meaning.

Please read "4.1.2.1. String Constants" and "4.1.2.2. String Constants with C-Style Escapes" from the manual (http://www.postgresql.org/docs/current/static/sql-syntax-lexical.html#SQL-SYNTAX-CONSTANTS) for details.

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@Milen: Thanks for your efforts. I've edited my original post and included the code. I still cannot understand though, where the '\\' is converted to '\'. –  Chau Mar 25 '10 at 13:18
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Milen deserves credit for leading me to the answer - thanks!

Appearantly NpgSQL performs one escape-iteration before inserting my SQL statement into Postgres. Thus to solve my problem, I replaced all the occurances of my backslashes with two backslashes instead:

string path = ... my path ...
path = path.Replace("\\", "\\\\");
sqlStatement = "INSERT INTO images (file_location) VALUES ('" + path + "')";
share|improve this answer
    
C# uses the backslash (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/362314fe.aspx) for escape sequences in normal strings. Thus to include a single backslash in a string you need two backslashes. But there exist "Verbatim string literals", prefixed with @, which could be helpful in this case (@"c:\Docs\Source\a.txt" vs. "c:\\Docs\\Source\\a.txt"). –  Milen A. Radev Mar 25 '10 at 15:04
    
@Milen: Yeah the @ is normally very useful, but when the string is passed to NpgSQL the backslashes are removed :( –  Chau Apr 13 '10 at 9:33

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