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I often come across problems that seem reasonable to be solved in this way - I'll give a concrete fictional example, but I'd like to know the name, best practices - and whether this pattern is a good idea in general.

Problem

I need to notify subscribed users of arbitrary events. Lets say one of the process evaluates "orders" and users subscribe to that event but to only one type of orders.

Usage of solution

I imagine the code should look something along the lines of this:

<?php 
// ...

public function processOrders() {
    // ...
    (new notifications\orders())->send( $typeOfOrderThatWasJustProcessed );
    // ...
}

Implementation

So I create the base notification class:

<?php
abstract class notifications {
    abstract public function configurationForm();
    abstract public function send();
}

and the child class for this particular use case (syntax is invalid, abstract method signature differs from base class, bear with me):

namespace notifications;

class orders extends \notifications {
    public function configurationForm() {
        // prepare and return a form that will be rendered to HTML
        // where the user chooses type of order that he is interested in
    }

    abstract public function send($type) {
        // fetches needed users using the configuration which
        // was provided via the form above
    }
}

So each type of notification will have to have arbitrary parameters. They inform the notification object about entities that were processed - so that the notification code can decide itself who to send the emails to.

Treat the $type in this example as a dynamic value - any number of types can be added via database.

As previously stated, this is not even possible with abstract classes in PHP, which way should I look?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would add the parameters needed via the constructor of the concrete notifications classes, then send does not need to receive any....Kind of like a command object inside an observer scenario...

Of course it depends on if the actual values of the parameters are known at instantiation time... if not maybe some kind of parameter object could be passed into the constructor, such that when the parameters change, the parameter object is updated too (as it is a reference in PHP 5)?

namespace notifications;

class orders extends \notifications {
    protected $type;
    public function __construct($type) {
        $this->type = $type;
    }

    public function configurationForm() {
      //...
    }

    abstract public function send() {
       // do stuff with $this->type
    }
}

OR

namespace notifications;

class orders extends \notifications {
    protected $parameters;
    public function __construct(NotificationParameters $parameters) {
        //$parameters might be a subclass of NotificationParameters, like OrderNotificationParameters
        $this->parameters = $parameters;
    }

    public function configurationForm() {
      //...
    }

    abstract public function send() {
       // do stuff with $this->parameters->getType(); the value of which might have changed since construction time
    }
}

What do you reckon?

UPDATE - using sub classes Command pattern I believe - http://www.sitepoint.com/understanding-the-command-design-pattern/

namespace notifications;

abstract class orders extends \notifications {

    abstract public function send() {
       // do stuff with $this->type
    }
}

class TypeAOrders extends orders {

    public function send() {
       // do Type A stuff
    }
}

class TypeBOrders extends orders {

    public function send() {
       // do Type B stuff
    }
}

....

public function processOrders() {
    // ...
    $commandBuilder->getNotification(typeOfOrderThatWasJustProcessed)->send();
    //$commandBuilder knows which object to build  depending on the type and pass any relevant parameters into the constructor...
    // ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is an excellent solution, I just hate it that we're on php 5.3 so the ` (new notifications\orders())->send( $type );` becomes two lines, but that's a minor issue. I'm still waiting for the insight to the pattern itself - its name and more info about it before I cast the answered checkbox though. –  Raveren Jul 24 at 14:01
    
yes, php 5.4 is a lot nicer in syntax... I believe it to be a kind of Command design pattern (sitepoint.com/understanding-the-command-design-pattern).. Question, how does configurationForm come into play here? because if we have a line like (new notifications\orders())->send( $type ) (or (new notifications\orders($type))->send()) the object is created, used and then destroyed straight away so the method seems to be unused to me.. Also, maybe take the logic of the type out of the send method entirely and have different subclasses of notifications\orders for each type? –  malte Jul 24 at 16:04
    
updated answer to illustrate last point ;) –  malte Jul 24 at 16:10
    
the obvious, clear and ingenious solution I decided to go with was __construct($type) FYI :) thanks! –  Raveren Jul 25 at 7:59
1  
No probs! I like your kint tool raveren.github.io/kint by the way;) Discovered it a few weeks back, it's very helpful indeed.... –  malte Jul 25 at 10:00

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