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How do i run TestCase's from the IDE?

i created a new project, with a single, simple, form:

unit Unit1;

interface

uses
  Windows, Messages, SysUtils, Classes, Graphics, Controls, Forms, Dialogs,
  StdCtrls;

type
  TForm1 = class(TForm)
  private
  public
  end;

var
  Form1: TForm1;

implementation

{$R *.DFM}

end.

Now i'll add a test case to check that pushing Button1 does what it should:

unit Unit1;

interface

uses
  Windows, Messages, SysUtils, Classes, Graphics, Controls, Forms, Dialogs,
  StdCtrls;

type
  TForm1 = class(TForm)
     Button1: TButton;
     procedure Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
  private
  public
  end;

var
  Form1: TForm1;

implementation

{$R *.DFM}

uses
    TestFramework;

type
  TForm1Tests = class(TTestCase)
  private
        f: TForm1;
  protected
     procedure SetUp; override;
     procedure TearDown; override;
  published
     procedure TestButton1Click;
  end;

procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
begin
    //todo
end;

{ TForm1Tests }

procedure TForm1Tests.SetUp;
begin
  inherited;

    f := TForm1.Create(nil);
end;

procedure TForm1Tests.TearDown;
begin
    f.Free;
  inherited;
end;

procedure TForm1Tests.TestButton1Click;
begin
    f.Button1Click(nil);
    Self.CheckEqualsString('Hello, world!', f.Caption);
end;

end.

Given what i've done (test code in the GUI project), how do i now trigger a run of the tests? If i push F9 then the form simply appears:

alt text

Ideally there would be a button, or menu option, in the IDE saying Run DUnit Tests:

alt text

Am i living in a dream-world? A fantasy land, living in a gumdrop house on lollipop lane?

share|improve this question
    
As an aside, you'll find that your business logic is easier to unit test if you separate it out into classes, rather than trying to unit test your UI event handlers directly. –  Incredulous Monk Mar 23 '10 at 5:45
    
@Monk: The downside of that is that i have code spread across multiple classes, or worse multiple files. –  Ian Boyd Mar 25 '10 at 19:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I agree with Uwe Raabe, but sometimes it can be useful to have a 'hidden' link within your app to run the DUnit GUI. I use:

TGUITestRunner.runRegisteredTests;

Call this from your button at the DUnit GUI will open for you to manually run and view test output.


For example, if you hold down a special key combination when opening the software's own "Control Panel", you get some advanced entries:

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
WHy is this better than having a project group with MyApp and MyApp_Tests as two separate projects? –  Warren P Mar 22 '10 at 16:57
    
If i have a separate project with test code, then wouldn't have a separate project? i really don't want to have to flip between projects. i don't want to have to flip a drop-down between "Real Project" and "Test Project". If that means i have test code embedded in my final executable: then so be it. –  Ian Boyd Mar 22 '10 at 17:07
3  
A switchable 'real' and 'test' mode project? Code smells ahead :P –  mjn Mar 22 '10 at 18:48
3  
@Warren P: Because there are (nasty) situtations where your app is on a customer's machine, he (She) is not looking over your shoulder and you bless that you can use some low-level built in tools such as your DUnit tests to assure you that the basics are ok. Bri –  Brian Frost Mar 22 '10 at 21:27
2  
@Brian Frost: No one hinders you to copy the TextProject.exe to that machine and run it. –  Uwe Raabe Mar 23 '10 at 6:52

Adding a TestCase to the main project is not the way to go. You should create a separate TestProject (you can have it in the same ProjectGroup as the main project), add a TestCase and run.

share|improve this answer
1  
Exactly. Test Case code does not belong IN YOUR APPLICATION. Your test case project contains your unit tests. You create a new unit test application, you add your application code to the uses-clause of your unit test. –  Warren P Mar 22 '10 at 16:57
2  
Is there a way to run the test project without having to switch away from the real project? i'd like to treat tests similar to a Syntax Check, Build Project or Build All. –  Ian Boyd Mar 22 '10 at 17:08
4  
add it as another project to the same project group. Then you can do a build all from here and so forth... –  François Mar 22 '10 at 17:26
    
@François Is there a way to run the tests contained in the other "test project" while i'm in the project i'm developing? –  Ian Boyd Mar 22 '10 at 21:10
    
Seems to me that people are concerned about test code being in the executable, rather than being logically separate - and used to test the code. i'm okay with DUnit working it so that the test cases are compiled away... –  Ian Boyd Mar 22 '10 at 21:16

I like the idea of having a 'Run DUnit tests' command in the IDE.

It could be implemented by checking for a DUnit project in the same folder, having the same name as the current project:

  • Project1.dpr -> the software under test
  • Project1.Tests.dpr => the DUnit test app

In this case, the IDE should enable the Run DUnit tests command.

  • After executing the tests, a list of all failed tests should be displayed which allows to jump to the source line where a test failed.

  • If tests caused memory leaks, a list of all leaks should be displayed which allows to jump to the source line where the memory leak has been created

(DUnit can be configured to detect memory leaks and fail tests when one has been found)

share|improve this answer
    
Now someone just has to write it ;) –  Ian Boyd May 28 '10 at 17:46
    
Maybe one of my supporters :) delphi.uservoice.com/forums/4432-general/suggestions/… –  mjn May 28 '10 at 19:19

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