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I am making a save/load system for a big game project in C#.

Each class that has to be saved implements a method DoSnapshot().

Inside the method, the programmer must make a call to a function for every field in the class - either DoSnapshot(foo) if foo should be saved, or Ignore(foo) if it should not.

I have a DoSnapshot method for many primitive types like DoFloat, DoString as well as versions for complex types.

I have 100s of classes and the project is still being developed.

Is it possible to add some kind of verification that all of the fields in each class are either used in a Snapshot() or an Ignore() call? Omitting fields would cause bugs. The verification could either be runtime, or compile-time. I only want to use it during development, it will not be released to users.

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Have you looked in writting a custom FXCop Rule? blogs.msdn.com/b/codeanalysis/archive/2010/03/26/… –  JoshBerke Jul 24 at 16:11
    
No... anyways, we are using Visual Studio Express 2010 and I don't think it is supported. –  user1919998 Jul 24 at 16:19
    
Nope it's not there are other tools that do Static Code analysis and let you add custom rules. I think your best bet is to provide a Base DoSnapshot method so the devs only have to mark with attributes...You can easily write a routine to make sure every object that needs saved has all properties marked as required or ignore. And the devs wouldn't have to implement the dosnapshot method:-) –  JoshBerke Jul 24 at 16:28

3 Answers 3

You could add an attribute to the fields that need to be saved, and then loop over every property in your class in the DoSnapshot method. When the property has the attribute you're looking for, you call Snapshot, otherwise you call Ignore.

public class SomeClass : SomeBaseClass
{
    [Required]
    public string Foo { get; set; }
    public string Bar { get; set; }

    public override void DoSnapshot()
    {
        var properties = this.GetType().GetProperties();
        foreach (var property in properties)
        {
            var isRequired = property.GetCustomAttributes(typeof (RequiredAttribute), false).Length > 0;
            if (isRequired)
            {
                // Something
            }
            else
            {
                // SomethingElse
            }
        }
    }
}
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The point is to check if the programmer has forgotten something. Using tags instead of method calls seems to only move the problem... –  user1919998 Jul 24 at 15:41
    
In the example I provided, all the properties are fetched and either Ignore or Snapshot can be called, so you are insuring that every field is looked at. –  Gabriel G. Roy Jul 24 at 15:46
    
Ok, thanks. Well there should be an Ignore tag also. In any case, what I need is verification for the method calls. The example is simplified. I have about 30 versions of DoSnapshot - DoFloat, DoString etc. –  user1919998 Jul 24 at 15:56

What i would do is create an attribute and "tag" each field if it should be saved or not. Then, at runtime, i would query the class using reflection to get all fields which should be serialized:

public class RandomClass
{
    public string Foo { get; set; }
    [Ignore]
    public int Bar { get; set; }
}

public class IgnoreAttribute : Attribute
{

}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var properties = typeof(RandomClass).GetProperties()
                        .Where(prop => !prop.IsDefined(typeof(IgnoreAttribute), false));
        // Serialize all values
    }
}
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What you're doing sounds a lot like standard .NET serialization/deserialization. Have you looked into making your types [Serializable] / ISerializable?

There are certain rules that define what will be serialized by default and what won't be, which means that instead of manually thinking about each and every property and field of your types, you only have to think about the exceptions, i.e. the properties and fields that deviate from these standard rules.

(For example, you would not have to Snapshot() these properties/fields that the .NET serializers would choose to serialize by default anyway. You'd only have to specify the exceptions: Your Ignore might possibly be replaced with [NonSerialized].)


P.S.: As you state in a comment, you have already decided on your own mechanism instead of .NET serialization. Nevertheless, perhaps it's not too late to grab one idea from serialization: convention over configuration.

That is, do you need to handle all properties/fields, or only the unusual cases, i.e. those properties that deviate from some fixed, pre-defined rules? The former makes it easier to systematically check for complete coverage (e.g. via System.Reflection over your code), the latter potentially saves you a lot of work and makes the exceptions stand out more clearly.

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Thanks, we considered that, but the design is now settled. –  user1919998 Jul 24 at 15:47
    
@user1919998: Added a P.S. to my answer. See above. –  stakx Jul 24 at 16:03
    
Mostly the fields that should not be serialized are references to other objects, collections of references, fields used in timesliced computations or scratch pad fields. –  user1919998 Jul 24 at 16:05
    
@user1919998: Not sure if I understand exactly what that means. However, if you can define these rules precisely, and if you can mark special types/fields (i.e. the collection types, the "scratch pad" fields, and the "timesliced computation" fields) e.g. using some custom attribute, then it's entirely possible that you can write some code that reflects over your types and sees whether they adhere to your rules. You could even have a T4 template automatically generate the Load/Save methods based on such reflection code. –  stakx Jul 24 at 16:08

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