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I'm trying to write a hook into MS Excel using VSTO's, and I'm really close to what I need, but I have a minor issue.

I've used the low-level WINAPI calls to get the Keyboard events and check for the key-strokes (which works well).

    [DllImport("user32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto, SetLastError = true)]
    private static extern IntPtr SetWindowsHookEx(int idHook, KeyCaptureDelegate lpfn, IntPtr hMod, uint dwThreadId);

    [DllImport("user32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto, SetLastError = true)]
    private static extern IntPtr CallNextHookEx(IntPtr hhk, int nCode, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam);

    private static IntPtr KeyCaptureCallback(int nCode, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam)
    {
        if (nCode >= 0)
        {
            int pointerCode = Marshal.ReadInt32(lParam);

            bool result = false;

            if (wParam == (IntPtr)WM_KEYDOWN)
            {
                if (KeyDown != null)
                {
                    result = KeyDown(pointerCode);
                }
            }

            //if (result)
                //return IntPtr.Zero;
        }

        return CallNextHookEx(_keyCaptureHook, nCode, wParam, lParam);
    }

Everything is hooked up and working well (using SetWindowsHookEx) and my code gets called via KeyDown without any issues. The only problem is that I'm trying to override a default command in Excel, i.e. Ctrl+Shift+1. This causes the default functionality to occur.

In my code, result returns whether or not the behavior should be overwritten (i.e. use my new behavior, rather than default). I had hoped, perhaps, that returning IntPtr.Zero would break and remove the keys from the pump, but that seemed to not do anything.

Is there a way to block the other (default) behavior? I would imagine that by canceling/handling the event (like we can in WinForms/WPF), there should be some way to prevent the key stroke from migrating further into Excel. Any thoughts?

share|improve this question
    
I can't remember exactly what to return, but you shouldn't call CallNextHookEx when you want to eat the key stroke yourself. –  Sriram Sakthivel Jul 24 at 16:05
    
I just figured it out. Oy. Had to convert from IntPtr's (which were in the sample source code) to int's on the WINAPI calls -- then just changed from IntPtr.Zero to 1 on the return. Will post an example. –  Locke Jul 24 at 16:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

So, I needed to make a few minor changes:

    private delegate IntPtr KeyCaptureDelegate(int nCode, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam);

became:

    private delegate int KeyCaptureDelegate(int nCode, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam);

and

    [DllImport("user32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto, SetLastError = true)]
    private static extern IntPtr CallNextHookEx(IntPtr hhk, int nCode, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam);

became:

    [DllImport("user32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto, SetLastError = true)]
    private static extern int CallNextHookEx(IntPtr hhk, int nCode, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam);

Which allowed me to rewrite it as:

    private static int KeyCaptureCallback(int nCode, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam)
    {
        if (nCode >= 0)
        {
            int pointerCode = Marshal.ReadInt32(lParam);

            bool result = false;

            if (wParam == (IntPtr)WM_KEYDOWN)
            {
                if (KeyDown != null)
                {
                    result = KeyDown(pointerCode);
                }
            }

            if (result)
            {
                return 1;
            }
        }

        return CallNextHookEx(_keyCaptureHook, nCode, wParam, lParam);
    }
share|improve this answer
2  
You could keep return type as IntPtr itself and return (IntPtr)1 or new IntPtr(1). Also +1 for posting your work.. –  Sriram Sakthivel Jul 24 at 16:18
    
Do you realise that IntPtr is correct and int is not? If you want to do this properly you need to understand IntPtr. –  David Heffernan Jul 25 at 5:52
    
Do you have any documentation -- I figured it was, but there were some MSDN (from MVPs) that referenced it as int, rather than IntPtr, per other references. Do you have a link that confirms this change? –  Locke Jul 25 at 19:44

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