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Is this a good method to save to all index in a variable and then echo this? for example

<?php
    $txt='<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN"        "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
   <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
   <head>
   <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-9" />
   <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="css/style.css"/>
   <title>Untitled Document</title>
   </head>

   <body>
  <div class="wrapper">
      <div class="header">
        <h2>'.heaf_func().'</h2>
      </div>
      <div class="content">content</div>
      <div class="footer">footer</div>
  </div>
  </body>
  </html>';
  echo $txt;

?>
share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Generally, no. If you need to do output buffering, just use the output buffering API. Even if you need to retrieve your output to do post-processing on it, you can do that using ob_get_contents. It won't be a big deal on most pages, but on large pages or under heavy server load you should use the output buffering support because it's better optimized for what you're trying to accomplish.

Generally, when looking at a method such as what you're contemplating, ask yourself "what does this gain me?" Your example above is clearly trivial, but unless you're planning on post-processing your results, what does it gain you?

EDIT:

I've used both the PHP-in-XML and XML-in-PHP approaches in various projects. My experience is that on a project of any significant size the PHP-in-XML (or HTML, but I try to always generate XML or XHTML) eventually turns into nasty spaghetti code that becomes a pain to maintain, whereas the XML-in-PHP approach eventually balloons into a mess of string-manipulation code that you also don't want to maintain.

Generally, I'd recommend going with an MVC (MVVM, MVP, etc. - up to you) framework for every web app, regardless of language. If applied correctly, the additionally framework complexity is more than compensated by the modularity and ease of maintenance and extensibility that you gain. If you don't feel the need or desire to target a framework (though, again, I STRONGLY recommend it), I typically follow these rules:

  1. Whenever possible, limit PHP-in-XML to simple inclusion of values. E.g., <h1><?php echo $title; ?></h1> Try to avoid including logic in your spaghetti code (other than, perhaps, repetition, though I typically abstract that away, too).
  2. Whenever possible, create XML documents using the XML API's instead of writing raw values to the output. XML has the advantage of being easily transformable, which in my experience is well worth the extra initial investment, at least in production apps.
  3. Send the client an XML document representing your data with an xml-stylesheet processing instruction indicating the location of a stylesheet to apply for rendering and let the client do its own rendering. Failing that, put your data-to-presentation transformation logic in a stylesheet (XSLT, not CSS) and do the transformation server-side. I really enjoy the separation between data and presentation it allows me.
share|improve this answer
    
for all project what is the best method? embedding html in php or php in html?(like Aistina's answer) – jasmine Mar 22 '10 at 16:41
    
@jasmine Sorry, I didn't understand that was the gist of the question. I'll update my response to target that. – Dathan Mar 22 '10 at 17:09

I'd personally change your example to be like this;

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN"        "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
   <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
   <head>
   <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-9" />
   <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="css/style.css"/>
   <title>Untitled Document</title>
   </head>

   <body>
  <div class="wrapper">
      <div class="header">
        <h2><?php echo heaf_func(); ?></h2>
      </div>
      <div class="content">content</div>
      <div class="footer">footer</div>
  </div>
  </body>
  </html>
share|improve this answer
1  
+1. Much better in this (template) style - easier to maintain, prettier to look at. – Andy E Mar 22 '10 at 16:25
    
a raw xhtml on page?? – jasmine Mar 22 '10 at 16:38

The question is why you want to do this. Just putting it in a variable and then echoing it isn't worth it but if you need to work on the string further (string replacement, etc.) it is useful.

share|improve this answer

If you're going to be doing massive multi-line text-into-variable assignments like that, consider using the HEREDOC syntax, which has the advantage of not forcing to you escape quotes, which makes the text blob far easier to read and cut/paste into other things without needing tweaks.

As for choosing if you should do PHP-in-HTML or HTML-in-PHP, it all comes down to which one would be more readable. If you have 500 lines of HTML, and only a small bit of PHP to insert, then go for PHP-in-HTML, and vice-versa. For a near even-balance, it'd come to whatever your preference is.

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