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This is my first time working with reading from file descriptors and I've been testing through trial and error for about 3 hours now, and I almost have my reader working! I just need a little bit of help on checking for EOF on a named pipe.

Ok so i'm opening a (well multiple) named pipe like this:

fds[j].fd = open(pipeNameo, O_RDWR) ; // storing it into my file descriptor array

then I am polling the named pipes to see if anything has come through (poll is within a loop):

int ret = poll(fds, numOfPipesUsed, timeout_msecs);

And when something does come through I process the file by sending the file descriptor that was written to over to this function:

int processFileDes( int fd )
{
    char buf[10] ;

    read(fd, buf, 1) ;
    char curr = buf[0] ;
    while (curr != EOF)
    {

        if ( curr == ' ')
        {
            // do nothing it is a space
        }
        else if ( curr == '\n')
        {
            printf("NEW LINE!\n") ;
        }
        else
        {
            int num = curr - '0' ; // turns char number into an int
            printf("Curr Num: %d\n", num) ;
        }

        printf("BEFORE\n"); // Gets stuck here when EOF, this is the string of output
        read(fd, buf, 1) ;
        printf("AFTER\n") ;

        curr = buf[0] ;
    }
printf("Success!\n") ; // this is never printed
return 0 ;
}

Everything works perfectly fine, except the read() function gets stuck (waiting for a return I imagine) once all characters have already been read. Where an EOF is supposed to be. I need to be able to check for EOF .

I tried a workaround that stopped my program from reading by counting the number of characters read (since I know the size of the input), and it would have worked, only thing is when there is a space after the last char it causes my looped poll to return a 1 and run the processFile() all over again on the remaining spaces (not valid input) left to be read.

Please help :')

The input is just a matrix of numbers like this:

0 1 1
2 0 3
1 0 0
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

you need to open nonblocking as a pipe will wait for data to become available:

fds[j].fd = open(pipeNameo, O_RDWR | O_NONBLOCK);
share|improve this answer

You should first ensure that you are actually hitting an end of file on the pipe.

When you open a FIFO (another name for a named pipe) for reading, the process will wait until another process opens it for writing and writes something. It will then continue to wait for more input until all processes that have it open for write have closed it.

You can test this in a couple of terminal windows using mkfifo and cat:

$ mkfifo test-fifo
$ cat test-fifo     # This is the reading process and will wait for data to read

In another terminal:

$ cat > test-fifo   # This is the writing process; type here and see it above

Now if you close the writing process, the reading process will exit because it has hit the end of the file.

However, if you open two writing processes, and exit only one, the FIFO will stay open and the read end will not end, until you close both of them.

So, one possibility, which is very easy mistake to make, is to still have the FIFO open for write somewhere, so the reading end will never get an end of file condition. One thing to be wary of is if this process itself also has the FIFO open for writing, or if whatever process produced the data is simply keeping the pipe open rather than closing it after it's done.

If you can't figure out whether a process has the pipe open for write, try fuser or lsof to identify any processes that may have it open.

Some other comments on your code, which may also be problems:

char buf[10] ;

read(fd, buf, 1) ;
char curr = buf[0] ;
while (curr != EOF)

This is not how you determine if you've hit the end of the file using the low-level, unbuffered read primitive; this is how you do it with buffered stdio operation like fgetc. With read, you call it with a desired length to read, and it returns how much it could read (which may be less than the length you asked for), 0 if it is at the end of the file, and -1 on error. If you are not checking the return value of read, you have a bug. Note that not all errors are fatal.

Even if you were using fgetc, this code is buggy. fgetc returns an int, not a char, so that it can return the full range of character values as well as a sentinel value for EOF.

    printf("BEFORE\n"); // Gets stuck here when EOF, this is the string of output
    read(fd, buf, 1) ;
    printf("AFTER\n") ;

You should generally not try to read the same file descriptor twice in between calls to poll; otherwise, the second one may block if there is no more data available on the file descriptor. Instead, you should do one read of a certain amount of data, but be prepared for read to return less data than you requested, and go back to your poll loop to find out what data is now available (possibly on a different fd, if this one has no new data available but another one does).

The way to use read is generally to read an entire buffer at a time, not a single character at a time.

share|improve this answer

A return value of 0 from read indicates an EOF.

share|improve this answer
    
The thing is, it never returns once EOF is reached. The read() gets stuck on the final iteration of the loop. – David Baez Jul 24 '14 at 19:01
    
The printf("AFTER\n") at the end of my loop never prints the final time around, meaning the read() never finishes when it is attempting to do a read and it is already EOF. – David Baez Jul 24 '14 at 19:03
    
@DavidBaez Your code never checks the return value of read. Also since you are reading from a pipe, you won't see an EOF until the other end of the pipe is closed. Is that happening? – dohashi Jul 24 '14 at 19:10
    
@DavidBaez If read() returns 0, you shouldn't call read() again. Your code needs to check the return value of read() and handle a return value of 0 (EOF) and -1 (an error). You also need to make sure the other end of your named pipe is actually closed. There will be no EOF until the other end is closed. – nos Jul 24 '14 at 19:56

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