Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a small form with 10 textboxes, I have them set in the right Tab Order currently the way I want them to Tab To. I was wondering if there is a way to set the textboxes up so they cannot be selected for editing unless they are Tabbed into. ie... I don't want the end user to be able to click on the textbox to edit them, I only want them editable through Tabbing.

share|improve this question
7  
May I ask what controlling the user's experience in such a way buys you? Seems like a strange requirement. –  Mike Cheel Jul 24 '14 at 20:14
    
What if tab key is faulted in user's machine :p –  Sriram Sakthivel Jul 24 '14 at 20:15
    
What about subscribing to the Click event and focusing another control when fired? Also, I was wondering the same thing as @MikeCheel. –  Jashaszun Jul 24 '14 at 20:15
    
Ok, for those wondering why: I'm first off writing it for me, myself and I, and maybe a friend or two. I'm writing a dps calculator for a online game (convenience tool). I believe it is easier and quicker to move from box to box using the Tab/Enter keys, whereas using the mouse to click each box separately seems a bit slower to me and since most people instinctively click with the mouse button they may not think to use the Tab. This of course is all personal preference and if I thought later that there was not much of a difference I could always undo it. –  roadmaster Jul 24 '14 at 20:22
    
@roadmaster Still it doesn't make sense. Even if the textboxes are clickable, you can still navigate between boxes using TAB key. –  C.J. Jul 24 '14 at 20:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This should do the trick

public partial class PoorTextBox : TextBox
{
    protected override void WndProc(ref Message m)
    {
        if (m.Msg == (int) WM.LBUTTONDOWN)
        {
            return;//Eat mouse down events 
        }
        base.WndProc(ref m);
    }
}

Window messages enum can be found here.


How to do it without inheriting TextBox :

class EatMouseDown : NativeWindow
{
    protected override void WndProc(ref Message m)
    {
        if (m.Msg == (int)WM.LBUTTONDOWN)
        {
            return;
        }
        base.WndProc(ref m);
    }
}

protected override void OnLoad(EventArgs e)
{
    base.OnLoad(e);

    new EatMouseDown().AssignHandle(textBox1.Handle);//Subclass a Handle
}


How to do it without any inheritance:

Clean up part omitted, which is also important. This may be buggy but that works. Recommended way is to use inheritance. Required methods pulled from .net fw src.

class EatMouseDown
{
    public delegate IntPtr WndProc(IntPtr hWnd, int msg, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam);

    #region External methods...

    [DllImport("user32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto)]
    public static extern IntPtr SetWindowLong(HandleRef hWnd, int nIndex, WndProc wndproc);

    [DllImport("user32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto)]
    public static extern IntPtr SetWindowLongPtr(HandleRef hWnd, int nIndex, WndProc wndproc);

    [DllImport("user32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto)]
    public static extern IntPtr GetWindowLong(HandleRef hWnd, int nIndex);

    [DllImport("user32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto)]
    public static extern IntPtr GetWindowLongPtr(HandleRef hWnd, int nIndex);

    [DllImport("user32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto)]
    public static extern IntPtr DefWindowProc(IntPtr hWnd, int msg, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam);

    [DllImport("user32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto)]
    public static extern IntPtr CallWindowProc(IntPtr wndProc, IntPtr hWnd, int msg, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam);

    #endregion

    private const int GWLP_WNDPROC = -4;
    private IntPtr handle;
    private IntPtr originalWndProc;
    private IntPtr currentWndProc;

    public static IntPtr SetWindowLongHelper(HandleRef hWnd, int nIndex, WndProc wndProc)
    {
        return IntPtr.Size == 4
            ? SetWindowLong(hWnd, nIndex, wndProc)
            : SetWindowLongPtr(hWnd, nIndex, wndProc);
    }

    public static IntPtr GetWindowLongHelper(HandleRef hWnd, int nIndex)
    {
        return IntPtr.Size == 4
            ? GetWindowLong(hWnd, nIndex)
            : GetWindowLongPtr(hWnd, nIndex);
    }

    internal void SubclassHandle(IntPtr handle)
    {
        this.handle = handle;
        this.originalWndProc = GetWindowLongHelper(new HandleRef(this, handle), GWLP_WNDPROC);
        SetWindowLongHelper(new HandleRef(this, handle), GWLP_WNDPROC, new WndProc(this.Callback));
        this.currentWndProc = GetWindowLongHelper(new HandleRef(this, handle), GWLP_WNDPROC);
    }

    private IntPtr Callback(IntPtr hwnd, int msg, IntPtr wparam, IntPtr lparam)
    {
        var m = Message.Create(hwnd, msg, wparam, lparam);
        if (m.Msg == (int)WM.LBUTTONDOWN)
        {
            return IntPtr.Zero;
        }
        return CallWindowProc(originalWndProc, hwnd, msg, wparam, lparam);
    }
}

protected override void OnLoad(EventArgs e)
{
    base.OnLoad(e);

    new EatMouseDown().SubclassHandle(textBox1.Handle);//Subclass a Handle
}
share|improve this answer
1  
@MatinLotfaliee Don't be childish. –  Sriram Sakthivel Jul 24 '14 at 20:33
4  
@MatinLotfaliee - Your route isn't so pretty or simple when he has more than a few textboxes. At least with this route, you can create the control and then never have to worry about how it looks. –  Neil Smith Jul 24 '14 at 20:39
1  
@MatinLotfaliee Do you think what you have is simple? alteast for me, really not. It is convoluted code, more error prone, needs more test, violates DRY principle, etc. btw if inheriting is a problem you can pretty much do it without inheritance. –  Sriram Sakthivel Jul 24 '14 at 20:41
1  
Looks good. Works fine. –  TaW Jul 24 '14 at 20:47
1  
@ Sriram : you can pretty much do it without inheritance. Help me out on this one: How would that be done? –  TaW Jul 24 '14 at 20:49

Here's a similar approach to what Sriram Sakthivel had done, but using IMessageFilter instead:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        List<TextBox> TextBoxes = new List<TextBox>();
        FindTextBoxes(this, TextBoxes);
        Application.AddMessageFilter(new SuppressTextBoxClicks(TextBoxes));
    }

    private void FindTextBoxes(Control ctl, List<TextBox> TBs)
    {
        foreach(Control childCtl in ctl.Controls)
        {
            if (childCtl is TextBox)
            {
                TBs.Add((TextBox)childCtl);
            }
            else if(childCtl.HasChildren)
            {
                FindTextBoxes(childCtl, TBs);
            }
        }
    }
}

public class SuppressTextBoxClicks : IMessageFilter
{

    private List<TextBox> _TextBoxes = null;
    private const int WM_LBUTTONDOWN = 0x201;

    public SuppressTextBoxClicks(List<TextBox> TextBoxes)
    {
        _TextBoxes = TextBoxes;
    }

    public bool PreFilterMessage(ref Message m)
    {
        switch (m.Msg)
        {
            case WM_LBUTTONDOWN:
                if (_TextBoxes != null)
                { 
                    foreach(TextBox TB in _TextBoxes)
                    {
                        if (TB.Handle.Equals(m.HWnd))
                        {
                            return true;
                        }
                    }
                }

                break;

            default:
                break;
        }
        return false;
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
I was about to add similar one using IMessageFilter, And now there is no need for it +1 :) –  Sriram Sakthivel Jul 25 '14 at 6:14

Set all textboxes' Enabled property to false except the first one. On the TextChanged Event, check if it the Text is empty or not. if it was not empty, Enable the next TextBox and so on...

share|improve this answer
    
This might be workable, I'll see If I can come up with a working solution from your suggestion. thanks. –  roadmaster Jul 24 '14 at 20:37
1  
This is not really an answer as it makes assumptions on the relevance of the Text being empty or not that are not in the question. But maybe it helps anyway.. –  TaW Jul 24 '14 at 20:47

You can also try this one with the Enter event foreach TextBox

    private void textBox2_Enter(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (textBox1.Text == "")
            textBox1.Focus();
    }

    private void textBox3_Enter(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (textBox1.Text == "")
            textBox1.Focus();
        else
            if (textBox2.Text == "")
                textBox2.Focus();
    }

    private void textBox4_Enter(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (textBox1.Text == "")
            textBox1.Focus();
        else
            if (textBox2.Text == "")
                textBox2.Focus();
            else
                if (textBox3.Text == "")
                    textBox3.Focus();
    }
share|improve this answer
    
That's really ugly –  Sriram Sakthivel Jul 24 '14 at 20:30
2  
This is not really an answer as it makes assumptions on the relevance of the Text being empty or not that are not in the question. But maybe it helps anyway.. –  TaW Jul 24 '14 at 20:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.