Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to convert string to numbers. It can be float, integer, or empty string.

def num(s):
     if not s: return ""
     try:
          return int(s)
     except ValueError:
          return float(s)
     else: return 0

str1 = ""
str2 = "0.0"
str3 = "1.1"
str4 = "10"

print("str1 = "+str(num(str1)))
print("str2 = "+str(num(str2)))
print("str3 = "+str(num(str3)))
print("str4 = "+str(num(str4)))

so, the output:

str1 =     <== OK
str2 = 0.0 <== I need this as integer 0
str3 = 1.1 <== OK
str4 = 10  <== OK

anyone can help?

share|improve this question
1  
Why do you want the string representation of a float to become an integer?! –  jonrsharpe Jul 24 at 23:31
1  
Yes, you are converting, that is clear. My question is: why should '0.0' be converted to 0, not 0.0, when it clearly represents the latter? –  jonrsharpe Jul 24 at 23:34
1  
@user3175226 that still does not explain why you want to convert a float to an int, since JSON defines an int type and that clearly is not an int. –  aruisdante Jul 24 at 23:37
1  
Then why not use the json module instead of rolling your own function? –  jonrsharpe Jul 24 at 23:37
2  
And in general, you are presenting an XY problem. Instead of telling us what you're actually trying to do, you're telling us about a problem with your solution to what you're trying to do. Those are subtly different concepts. If what you're actually trying to do is decode JSON, then you should use the built-in tools to do so. –  aruisdante Jul 24 at 23:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted
"0.0"

is not a valid integer string. If you want to round off zeroes into integers then do it after you convert to a float.

def num(s):
    if not s: return ""
    try:
        return int(s)
    except ValueError:
        f = float(s)
        if f%1.0 < 0.0005:
            return int(f)
        else:
            return f
    else: return 0
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, but not works. same problem with "0.0" –  user3175226 Jul 24 at 23:38
    
On pythonfiddle.com it worked. I'll check my python version. thanks! –  user3175226 Jul 24 at 23:45
    
@user3175226 no, you're wrong, this outputs 0 for input of '0.0'. –  jonrsharpe Jul 24 at 23:45
1  
Bear in mind that if the try block includes return, the else will never run. –  jonrsharpe Jul 24 at 23:46

Try this:

def num(s):
    if not s:
        return ""
    try:
        return int(s)
    except ValueError:
        return float(s) or 0
    else:
        return 0

It works as expected:

num('')
=> ''
num('0.0')
=> 0
num('1.1')
=> 1.1
num('10')
=> 10
share|improve this answer
1  
it worked. thanks! –  user3175226 Jul 24 at 23:44

Try this :

Live Running example @ http://codepad.org/9xIbFxJ1

def num(s):

     if not s:
         return ""

     try:

        list_s = s.split(".")

        # If there is no fractional part or fractional part is 0 return int(s) else float(s)

        if ( len(list_s) == 1 ) or ( int(list_s[1]) == 0 ):
            return int(s) 
        else:
            return float(s)

     except: 
        return 0
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, but not works. everything is resulting 0 –  user3175226 Jul 24 at 23:37
    
Nope it works perfectly for me !! What was your input / which python version are you using ? –  rvraghav93 Jul 24 at 23:39
    
im on osx with python 2.7.5. same problem again. everything is 0 –  user3175226 Jul 24 at 23:41
    
@rvraghav93 don't use is to compare equality; this only works because CPython interns small integers, an implementation detail you should not be relying on for functionality. –  jonrsharpe Jul 24 at 23:49
    
@jonrsharpe Okay ! Noted ! :) –  rvraghav93 Jul 24 at 23:50

You can check this way. If the float and int of the number are the same then it's an int, else it's a float.

def make_number(n):
    try:
        n = float(n)
        if n == int(n):
            return int(n)
        return float(n)
    except ValueError:
        return 0

Edit: I thought int("1.2") would coerce to 1, I was wrong.

share|improve this answer
    
This will return a number or a string, which isn't terribly helpful, but more importantly claims "NOT A NUMBER!" for three of the OP's four examples. –  jonrsharpe Jul 25 at 0:30
    
I fixed the issues. Thought int coerced float-like-strings to the rounded down version like it does to real floats. –  BWStearns Jul 25 at 0:37

float(s) can convert string to float directly; and int(float(s)) will convert float to integer. Here we just need a tiny number to check whether the float can be an integer.

def num(s):
    if s == '': 
        return ''
    else:
        if float(s) < int(float(s)) + 0.0000000000001:
            return int(float(s))
        else:
            return float(s)
share|improve this answer
    
This is just a less efficient version of Andrew Johnson's answer; you have a minimum of three function calls for any non-empty string, and five if it's "integer-y". –  jonrsharpe Jul 25 at 0:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.