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I'm trying to create a NSMutableArray that has a float (converted to NSInteger) added to it when a button is pressed. The button is connected to a timerViewController and its block of code in the implementation file is as follows (you can disregard the if statement for the matter of this question):

- (IBAction)timeSaveButton:(UIButton *)sender {
    if ([self.timerStartOrStop.titleLabel.text  isEqual: @"Start"]){
        RecordedTimes *myTimes = [[RecordedTimes alloc] init];
        [myTimes addANewTime: self.timerTime];
    }
}

The "RecordedTimes" class it refers to has the NSMutableArray and "addANewTime" method declared in the .h file

@interface RecordedTimes : NSObject

@property (nonatomic) NSMutableArray *recordedTimes;

-(void)addANewTime: (float) timerTime;

@end

Its implementation file is

@implementation RecordedTimes

-(void) addANewTime:(float)timerTime{
    NSMutableArray *myTimes = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
    [myTimes addObject:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%f", timerTime]];
}

@end

The problem is that each time I save a new time, the array empties and stores only the most recent timerTime. I understand that this is because my viewController (and the addANewTime method) initializes the array each time, causing it to erase its contents. How to fix that problem and where to initialize the array instead is where I'm confused.

Please be detailed in your response. I am a newbie to XCode and Objective-C. Thanks.

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It's about scope of instance variable. techotopia.com/index.php/… –  trick14 Jul 25 at 6:40
    
Try to initialize NSMutableArray in viewDidLoad to avoid it being reinitialized everytime when you pass a message to addANewTime. –  YaItsMe Jul 25 at 7:09
    
If you find any answer compliant to your question please do vote it right. –  YaItsMe Jul 25 at 7:12

3 Answers 3

You've declared the NSMutableArray property called recordedTimes but never initialized it to an empty array. In somewhere convenient, like the init method, you can initialize it:

- (id)init {
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {
        self.recordedTimes = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
    }
    return self;
}

Then change addANewTime: to this:

- (void)addANewTime:(float)timerTime{
    [self.recordedTimes addObject:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%f", timerTime]];
}

This makes sure your mutable array property is initialized once (since init is called once when you initialize your object), and then you append to the end of the array each time addANewTime: is called.


Additionally, you're re-creating the RecordedTimes object every time the timeSaveButton: method is called. You'll want to follow the same pattern, and store it as a property on your view controller's class and then set it once in somewhere like the viewDidLoad method.


Aside: You've probably noticed that you can't store an int (or, generally, a primitive, non–object type) in an NSMutableArray object. You might consider converting the timerTime to an NSNumber with [NSNumber numberWithInt:timerTime] and storing that in the array instead of a string.

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Which file would the init method go in? And also, doesn't it require you to return something at the end since its return type is id? –  bibekg Jul 25 at 16:39
    
You'd put the init method in your RecordedTimes class. And yeah, nice catch! I've edited the example to return self. –  Jack Lawrence Jul 25 at 19:22
    
Hm, I haven't read anything about the init method so far. So does it basically just run whenever an object of a certain class is initialized? –  bibekg Jul 26 at 19:43
    
One more clarification. When you said "follow the same pattern, and store it as a property on your view controller's class", I assume you mean to declare the RecordedTimes class as a property. Would it be done like this: @property (nonatomic) RecordedTimes *myTimes; –  bibekg Jul 26 at 19:46
    
Yep! And remember to initialize it only once somewhere like viewDidLoad. –  Jack Lawrence Jul 29 at 20:31

To initializing a property, I usually do it in either:

In the viewDidLoad method of your view controller.

(void)viewDidLoad {
    [super viewDidLoad];
    self.recordedTimes = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
}

Or lazy initialize it when you need it, in this case, when you add your first time to it:

-(void) addANewTime:(float)timerTime {
    if (!self.recordedTimes) {
       self.recordedTimes = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
    }
    [self.recordedTimes addObject:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%f", timerTime]];
}

Also, you're doing several thing wrong:

  • First, you have a local variable, which gets deallocated after the method addANewTime is executed. Instead, you should declare a @property, to keep your array alive as long as the viewController (or the objects which has the property) is alive.
  • I assume you wanted to do that with @property (nonatomic) NSMutableArray *recordedTimes;, but you should actually use that, instead of a local variable.
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1  
assign and strong are not related. A property can have both assign and strong semantics. Additionally, all object properties are strong by default under ARC. –  Jack Lawrence Jul 25 at 6:49
    
(thanks for making the fix) –  Jack Lawrence Jul 25 at 6:53
    
I did not know that! Edited the answer. PS: Damn, I've written strong like a million times for no reason then... –  Lord Zsolt Jul 25 at 6:53
    
Yup! When I found out I had a lot of fun going through all my code and deleting strong :) –  Jack Lawrence Jul 25 at 6:54
    
I can't use self.recordedTimes in my viewController because it recordedTimes was only declared in the RecordedTimes object. –  bibekg Jul 25 at 16:54
if ()
{
    RecordedTimes *myTimes = [[RecordedTimes alloc] init];
}

The myTimes instance is only valid in if {} statement.

-(void) addANewTime:(float)timerTime
{
    NSMutableArray *myTimes = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
}

Also, myTimes instance is valid only in addNewTime: method.

That's why it seems to initialized every time.

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