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I'm working w/ a function that expects a string formatted as a utf-8 encoded octet string. Can someone give me an example of what a utf-8 encoded octet string would look like?

Put another way, if I convert 'foo' to bytes, I get 112, 111, 111. What would these char codes look like as a utf-8 encoded octet string? Would it be "0x70 0x6f 0x6f"?

The context of my question is the process of generating an openid signature as described in the openid spec: "The message MUST be encoded in UTF-8 to produce a byte string." I'm looking for an example of what this would look like.

Thanks

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That's a weird character encoding you're using if 'f' > 'o'. I assume you mean [102, 111, 111]. – dan04 Mar 26 '10 at 1:17

No. UTF-8 characters can span multiple bytes. If you want to learn about UTF-8, you should start with its article on Wikipedia, which has a good description.

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thanks. the wikipedia article was one of the first places I looked. I think I may just be hung up on terminology. if I run a string through php's utf8_encode, could the output be described as a utf8 encoded byte string? The context of my question is the process of generating an openid signature as described in the openid spec (openid.net/specs/openid-authentication-2_0.html#kvform): "The message MUST be encoded in UTF-8 to produce a byte string." I'm looking for an example of what this would look like. – erik Mar 22 '10 at 20:40
    
I'm unfamiliar with PHP's handling of UTF-8. Sorry. – Billy ONeal Mar 22 '10 at 21:37
    
utf8_encode(the_string) will give the correct result if the string is encoded in ISO-8859-1. – dan04 Mar 23 '10 at 6:42

I think you may have made some mistakes in encoding your example, but in any case, my guess is that the answer that you really need is the UTF-8 is a superset of ASCII (the standard way to encode characters into bytes).

So, if you give an ASCII encoded string into a function that expects a UTF-8 encoded string, it should work just fine.

However, the opposite isn't true at all. UTF-8 can represent a lot of character ASCII cannot, so giving a UTF-8 encoded string to a function that expects an ASCII (i.e. 'normal') string is dangerous (unless you're positive that all the characters are part of the ASCII subset).

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thanks. I'm trying to describe a need for something I don't fully understand. I'm writing a javascript openid signature generator. The openid spec states that the "message (to be signed) MUST be encoded in UTF-8 to produce a byte string." I'm looking for a language-agnostic example of what such a string would look like. thanks again. – erik Mar 22 '10 at 20:51

The string "foo" gets encoded as 66 6F 6F, but it's like that in nearly all ASCII derivatives. That's one of the biggest features of UTF-8: Backwards compatibility with 7-bit ASCII. If you're only dealing with ASCII, you don't have to do anything special.

Other characters are encoded with up to 4 bytes. Specifically, the bits of the Unicode code point are broken up into one of the patterns:

  • 0xxxxxxx
  • 110xxxxx 10xxxxxx
  • 1110xxxx 10xxxxxx 10xxxxxx
  • 11110xxx 10xxxxxx 10xxxxxx 10xxxxxx

with the requirement of using the shortest sequence that fits. So, for example, the Euro sign ('€' = U+20AC = binary 10 000010 101100) gets encoded as 1110 0010, 10 000010, 10 101100 = E2 82 AC.

So, it's just a simple matter of going through the Unicode code points in a string and encoding each one in UTF-8.

The hard part is figuring out what encoding your string is in to begin with. Most modern languages (e.g., Java, C#, Python 3.x) have distinct types for "byte array" and "string", where "strings" always have the same internal encoding (UTF-16 or UTF-32), and you have to call an "encode" function if you want to convert it to an array of bytes in a specific encoding.

Unfortunately, older languages like C conflate "characters" and "bytes". (IIRC, PHP is like this too, but it's been a few years since I used it.) And even if your language does support Unicode, you still have to deal with disk files and web pages with unspecified encodings. For more details, search for "chardet".

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