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Is it a good practice to set stream references to null after closing them? Would this release resources in any way?

Example:

BufferedReader input= new BufferedReader(new FileReader("myfile.txt"));

// code

input.close();
input = null;

// possible more code
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@Hei: Welcome to SO. Just for the future (and if you edit this question), you can indent lines of code with four spaces and they'll show up in special code blocks, which makes them easier to read. –  Pops Mar 22 '10 at 19:52
    
Thank you for the comment I will look into that for future questions. –  Hei Mar 22 '10 at 19:59

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No, it's bad practice. IMO, you should even consider making the variable final.

Resource handling should be handled in the standard acquire(); try { use(); } finally { release(); } manner. In this case:

final Reader rawIn = new FileReader("myfile.txt"); // Character encoding??
try {
    BufferedReader in = new BufferedReader(rawIn);

    // code

} finally {
    rawIn.close();
}

Actually this code picks up whatever character encoding is set as default. I suggest being explicit with either a particular hard-coded charset or Parameterise from Above.

final InputStream rawIn = new FileInputStream("myfile.txt");
try {
    BufferedReader in = new BufferedReader(
        new InputStreamReader(rawIn, "UTF-8")
    );

    // code

} finally {
    rawIn.close();
}

You should not create the wrapper streams/readers outside of the try block (and before the resource assignment) because they might throw. Similarly their close might throw (this was actually a bug in BufferedOutputStream which could throw on flush). Some input streams may have other resources so you need two try { ... finally { x.close(); }s.

For output, you generally should flush in the normal course of events. But generally don't in exceptional cases. Indeed close usually does a flush, therefore you should not close them in the exceptional case. If decorators both flush and have resources, then you'll have to grin and bare it.

There are highly infrequent occasions when nulling out is a good idea. For instance if a variable is the sole reference to a large object and you are going to create a new large object to assign to it, it may be best to clear the reference to allow the old to be reclaimed before allocating the new.

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4  
+1 for using final in stream declaration. -1 for closing inner (rawIn) stream. You should always close the most-derived stream. For example in your case BufferedReader may have some data in its internal buffer. Calling close on in will correctly flush this data. Calling close on rawIn will discard it. –  Alexander Pogrebnyak Mar 22 '10 at 20:48
    
Thank you for the answer and for mention a case where nulling out would be a good idea. –  Hei Mar 22 '10 at 20:52
    
@Alexander Pogrebnyak No. I'll add an edit. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Mar 22 '10 at 20:59
    
@Alexander is right. The BufferedReader is however a poor example. Rather test it with a BufferedWriter and a content less than 8KB. –  BalusC Mar 22 '10 at 21:12
    
@BalusC You do call flush, don't you? –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Mar 22 '10 at 23:56

Not needed. Just input.close() is enough. Remember its always wise to do this inside a finally block. And before calling close() its better to do a null check like this

finally{
  if(input!=null){
    input.close();
  }
}
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3  
If you perform the original assignment before the try block, you don't need the nullity check. It will only fail if the file can't be opened, in which case there's no problem anyway. –  Jon Skeet Mar 22 '10 at 19:56

Unless you're manually managing a pool of rosources (handling your own memory), it's not necessary to null the input stream. Ideally, whatever function you're in is small, and references to the object will die as the object goes out of scope, marking it for garbage collection anyway.

I mention pooling resources, as if you naively close the stream without nulling the object, you could accidentally hold on to a reference of the object that you don't actually need.

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It may make the Stream object itself eligible for garbage collection, but

  1. In most cases it will pass out of scope right afterwards anyway
  2. the amount of memory thus "released" is utterly insignificant
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Well, not immediately. It will have to go through finalisation before the memory is released on a subsequent collection. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Mar 22 '10 at 20:00

In this case it is not needed, the garbage collector will collect it.

But it is not always a bad practice to assign null. Read Item 6 from Effective Java, chapter 2

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No, it is not. The close() already frees up the resource. The normal practice is the following:

Resource resource = null;
try {
    resource = new Resource();
    // ...
} finally {
    if (resource != null) try { resource.close(); } catch (ResourceException logOrIgnore) {}
}

Where Resource can be any external resource you'd like to use, such as InputStream, OutputStream, Reader and Writer of Java IO API, but also for example Connection, Statement and ResultSet of JDBC API.

The memory is a non-issue in well designed code. If the code leaves the method block, it's already eligible for GC.

You can refactor the close() to an utility method like:

public static void close(Closeable resource) {
    if (resource != null) {
        try {
            resource.close();
        } catch (ResourceException logOrIgnore) {
            // Log it?
        }
    }
}

which you can use as follows:

} finally {
    close(resource);
}

The Apache Commons provides several utility methods like that.

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Or you can put the resource acquisition in the correct place w.r.t. the try. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Mar 22 '10 at 20:00
    
Fair point, but sometimes you'd like to catch, log and/or rethrow the exception in the same try block, if necessary as another kind of exception. –  BalusC Mar 22 '10 at 20:14
1  
Push the boat out! Use two try blocks!!! And then use the Execute Around idiom. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Mar 22 '10 at 20:17
    
Yes, I've seen that before here (stackoverflow.com/questions/341971 btw). Thank you for reminding that again :) (+1). –  BalusC Mar 22 '10 at 20:57

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