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This question already has an answer here:

when i try to compile this:

public class Risk
{
}
class territory 
{

    public static void main (String[]arg) 
    {
        System.out.println ("hi") ; 
    } 
}

I get this error message:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NoSuchMethodError: main

whats going wrong here?

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marked as duplicate by Stephen C, fglez, Stony, Blachshma, Shikiryu Apr 2 '13 at 8:26

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
This Community Wiki question lists the possible causes of this common problem: stackoverflow.com/questions/5407250/… – Stephen C Jun 28 '11 at 14:37

The class containing the main() function must be public, and you may only define one public class per file. You'll want to have two separate files Risk.java and Territory.java.

Risk.java:

public class Risk {
}

Territory.java:

public class Territory 
{

    public static void main (String[]arg) 
    {
        System.out.println ("hi") ; 
    } 
}

EDIT: It turns out this isn't true - I was able to run your initial code with the following command line:

java territory

But my earlier comments point to the best practice for a real app, such as a Risk game.

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What class are you trying to run? If you're using the class territory, that will work. Risk has no main method, though.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

What the answer wound up being was that the class i run must contain main or else it won't work. i'm posting this because, though other answers give roughly the same information, they don't make it explicit.

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Can you figure out why this example causes the same issue?

public class Simple {
    public void main(String args[]) {
        System.out.println("Inside function");
    }
}

Answer: because main() should be public static void!

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Could it just be a spacing issue? Your original post shows no space between the ']' and 'arg'.

Try this:

public static void main (String[] arg) 

or, if that still doesn't work:

public static void main (String arg[]) 
share|improve this answer
3  
-1 No, both of those are immaterial considerations. (Normally I don't downvote posts, but ones that suggest that formatting changes will make any difference demonstrate a deep misunderstanding of the language.) – Chris Jester-Young Mar 22 '10 at 22:03
1  
@Adrian: Sometimes, yes. (class Foo is different from classFoo.) Other times, such as here, no. Knowing when it makes a difference is a sign of a competent programmer. – Chris Jester-Young Mar 22 '10 at 22:44
2  
People don't need to make excuses for down-voting a blatantly wrong answer. Down-voting incorrect answers encourages people to verify their facts before posting. – Stephen C Mar 23 '10 at 3:51
1  
@elduff: It's one thing to say formatting is good for readability. It's another to say it changes language semantics. (In a language like Python, formatting does indeed change semantics, but we're talking about Java here.) Being a good programmer means you're able to tell which is which. – Chris Jester-Young Mar 23 '10 at 15:13
1  
@Adrian: Depends on how you define "deep misunderstanding". To me, if one doesn't understand how code is tokenised in a given language (i.e., in Java, String[]args is tokenised the same as String [ ] args), that says something about how much they understand the language. – Chris Jester-Young Mar 23 '10 at 15:21

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