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I've been trying to understand the differences between the two, but as of now I have a very rudimentary understanding. ARGV is a subset of IO I believe. I know that ARGV returns an array when called into a Ruby script, but IO does the same thing as well. Can anyone explain this topic to me or direct me to a good explanation? I've searched multiple blogs but to no avail. Thanks!

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

ARGV is an array:

> ARGV.class
=> Array

This array contains the command line arguments for your script. For example:

$ cat pancakes.rb 
puts ARGV.inspect

$ ruby pancakes.rb -where is house
["-where", "is", "house"]

IO is quite a bit different. IO is:

[...] the basis for all input and output in Ruby. [...]

Many of the examples in this section use the File class, the only standard subclass of IO. The two classes are closely associated. Like the File class, the Socket library subclasses from IO (such as TCPSocket or UDPSocket).

IO is the base class for file-like things in Ruby.

Perhaps you're thinking of ARGF rather than ARGV:

ARGF is a stream designed for use in scripts that process files given as command-line arguments or passed in via STDIN.

The arguments passed to your script are stored in the ARGV Array, one argument per element. ARGF assumes that any arguments that aren't filenames have been removed from ARGV.

[...]

If ARGV is empty, ARGF acts as if it contained STDIN, i.e. the data piped to your script.

So you can use ARGF like an IO that lets you say:

$ your_script some_file

and

$ some_command | your_script

without your_script really having to care about which way it is called.

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.... and STDERR, STDIN, STDOUT all three are instance of IO class. – Зелёный Jul 26 '14 at 6:28
    
@Зелёный because they're file-like things – mu is too short Jul 26 '14 at 7:12
    
Thanks! I have a better understanding now. – Matt16749 Jul 26 '14 at 16:42

The IO class is the basis for all input and output in Ruby. An I/O stream may be duplexed (that is, bidirectional), and so may use more than one native operating system stream.

Many of the examples in this section use the File class, the only standard subclass of IO. The two classes are closely associated. Like the File class, the Socket library subclasses from IO (such as TCPSocket or UDPSocket).

The Kernel#open method can create an IO (or File) object for these types of arguments:

A plain string represents a filename suitable for the underlying operating system. A string starting with "|" indicates a subprocess. The remainder of the string following the "|" is invoked as a process with appropriate input/output channels connected to it. A string equal to "|-" will create another Ruby instance as a subprocess. The IO may be opened with different file modes (read-only, write-only) and encodings for proper conversion. See ::new for these options. See Kernel#open for details of the various command formats described above.

Source: http://www.ruby-doc.org/core-2.1.2/IO.html

ARGF is a stream designed for use in scripts that process files given as command-line arguments or passed in via STDIN.

The arguments passed to your script are stored in the ARGV Array, one argument per element. ARGF assumes that any arguments that aren't filenames have been removed from ARGV.

argv → ARGV Returns the ARGV array, which contains the arguments passed to your script, one per element.

Source: http://www.ruby-doc.org/core-2.1.2/ARGF.html

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I see... Thanks for the explanation! – Matt16749 Jul 26 '14 at 16:43

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