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I want to do something like this, but I haven't had much success so far. I would like to make each attr a property that computes _lazy_eval only when accessed:

class Base(object):
    def __init__(self):
        for attr in self._myattrs:
            setattr(self, attr, property(lambda self: self._lazy_eval(attr)))

    def _lazy_eval(self, attr):
        #Do complex stuff here
        return attr


class Child(Base):
    _myattrs = ['foo', 'bar']


me = Child()
print me.foo
print me.bar

#desired output:
#"foo"
#"bar"

** UPDATE **

This doesn't work either:

class Base(object):
    def __new__(cls):
        for attr in cls._myattrs:
            setattr(cls, attr, property(lambda self: self._lazy_eval(attr)))
        return object.__new__(cls)

#Actual output (it sets both .foo and .bar equal to "bar"??)
#bar
#bar

** UPDATE 2 **

Used the __metaclass__ solution, but stuck it in Base.__new__ instead. It looks like it needed a better defined closure -- "prop()" -- to form the property correctly:

class Base(object):
    def __new__(cls):
        def prop(x):
            return property(lambda self: self._lazy_eval(x))
        for attr in cls._myattrs:
            setattr(cls, attr, prop(attr))
        return object.__new__(cls)

#Actual output!  It works!
#foo
#bar
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Technically you want a metaclass:

class LazyMeta(type):
    def __init__(cls, name, bases, attr):
        super(LazyMeta, cls).__init__(name, bases, attr)
        def prop( x ):
            return property(lambda self: self._lazy_eval(x))
        for x in attr['lazyattrs']:
            setattr(cls, x, prop(x))

class Base(object):
    __metaclass__ = LazyMeta
    lazyattrs = []
    def _lazy_eval(self, attr):
        #Do complex stuff here
        return attr

class Child(Base):
    lazyattrs = ['foo', 'bar']

me = Child()

print me.foo
print me.bar
share|improve this answer

Descriptors (such as instances of the property type) are only meaningful when they're held in the class object, not the instance object. So, you need to change the class, not the instance, and (in Python 2.6 or better) a class decorator is very handy for that purpose:

class Base(object):
    def _lazy_eval(self, attr):
        #Do complex stuff here
        return attr

def lazyclass(cls):
    for attr in cls._myattrs:
        setattr(cls, attr, property(lambda self: self._lazy_eval(attr)))
    return cls

@lazyclass
class Child(Base):
    _myattrs = ['foo', 'bar']

If you're stuck with Python 2.5 or earlier, the decorator syntax doesn't apply to classes, but it's easy to get the same effect, just with less nifty syntax -- change the last 3 rows to:

class Child(Base):
    _myattrs = ['foo', 'bar']
Child = lazyclass(Child)

which has the same semantics as the class decorator syntax.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, Alex. Unfortunately, this decorator method doesn't work for me. It gives me the same results as the new method (see my update to the question above). –  user297250 Mar 23 '10 at 2:46

You could consider using __getattr__() instead:

class Base(object):
    def __getattr__(self, attr):
        if attr not in self._myattrs:
            raise AttributeError
        return self._lazy_eval(attr)

    def _lazy_eval(self, attr):
        #Do complex stuff here
        return attr


class Child(Base):
    _myattrs = ['foo', 'bar']

me = Child()
print me.foo
print me.bar
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! This works. It feels a little less elegant, but it may be the best solution. –  user297250 Mar 23 '10 at 2:53

You can access class attributes through the __ class __ dict

self.__class__.attr
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