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I have a Win32 app that creates a simple window, I need to call that program/window from another program (cryengine). My app start at int WINAPI WinMain(...) . What should I do to archieve that ? Dinamyc Library, .exe, static library ?

I had planned to just call the .exe from my other program. It is better to use a .dll ?

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What about CreateProcess()? Wether it's better to use a DLL can't be answered in general. It's totally dependent on your concrete use cases. – πάντα ῥεῖ Jul 26 '14 at 12:08
    
Okay, Thanks. Finally I will execute a new process. – jmb95 Jul 27 '14 at 9:45
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You don't have to go the DLL or static library way to just launch your program from another program.

Use CreateProcess, ShellExecute or ShellExecuteEx .

If your program may be already running then you can use FindWindow to get the window of app and send some message using SendMessage to tell the app to activate the window.

However, finding & activating (SetForegroundWindow) will only flash the window button in the taskbar so that it gets user's attention. This is done by Windows so that other apps cannot interrupt and cause usability issues.

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I'll do that, Thanks – jmb95 Jul 27 '14 at 9:44

The main reason to use a DLL would be to host it in the same process as your EXE. If you are wanting to launch another program, then you want to start another EXE.

While in principle this is easy, this is wrought with potential problems.

Firstly, CreateProcess is the lowest-level way to start another EXE and it works, but only if the target program runs at the same privilege level. For a Win32 app, you should use ShellExecuteEx. There are also issues with ensuring the proper current working directory.

Here's a reasonably robust snippet of code you can use:

BOOL Autorun::SpawnProcess( const WCHAR* szExePath, const WCHAR* szExeArgs )
{
    if( !szExePath )
        return FALSE;

    // NOTE: szExeArgs can be NULL.

    // Get working directory from executable path.    
    WCHAR szDirectory[MAX_PATH];
    wcscpy_s( szDirectory, szExePath );
    PathRemoveFileSpec( szDirectory );

    // ShellExecute or ShellExecuteEx must be used instead of CreateProcess
    // to permit the shell to display a UAC prompt asking for consent to
    // elevate when the target executable's manifest specifies a run level
    // of "requireAdministrator".
    //
    // You can only use CreateProcess if you know that the application you
    // are spawning will be at the same run level as the current process.
    // Otherwise, you will receive ERROR_ACCESS_DENIED if the elevation
    // consent could not be obtained.
    SHELLEXECUTEINFO info;
    ZeroMemory( &info, sizeof( info ) );
    info.cbSize = sizeof( info );
    info.lpVerb = L"open";
    info.fMask = SEE_MASK_FLAG_NO_UI;
    info.lpFile = szExePath;
    info.lpParameters = szExeArgs;
    info.lpDirectory = szDirectory;
    info.nShow = SW_SHOW;
    if( !ShellExecuteEx( &info ) )
        return FALSE;

    return TRUE;
}

Another challenge here is if you want to try to track the child process in a 'job'. Some launchers have tried to use 'job objects' to be able to track everything that a child process itself might launch. The particular problem is LAUNCHER -> TARGET PROGRAM -> REAL PROGRAM and original TARGET PROGRAM exits. The problem is that 'job objects' are implicitly used by the Windows Program Compatibility Assistant, and you can't add a process to more than one job. The only reliable way you can ensure a created process is not added to the PCA job is to ensure all programs you are using have the proper manifest elements. See this blog post for more information.

For the simplified case of only caring about the child process itself, you can use something like this code snippet:

BOOL Autorun::SpawnProcessAndWait( const WCHAR *szExePath, const WCHAR *szExeArgs, DWORD *pdwExitCode )
{
    if( !szExePath )
        return FALSE;

    // NOTE: szExeArgs can be NULL.
    // NOTE: pExitCode can be NULL.

    // Get working directory from executable path.    
    WCHAR szDirectory[MAX_PATH];
    wcscpy_s( szDirectory, szExePath );
    PathRemoveFileSpec( szDirectory );

    // See SpawnProcess for information why ShellExecute or ShellExecuteEx
    // must be used instead of CreateProcess.
    SHELLEXECUTEINFO info;
    ZeroMemory( &info, sizeof( info ) );
    info.cbSize = sizeof( info );
    info.lpVerb = L"open";
    info.fMask = SEE_MASK_FLAG_NO_UI | SEE_MASK_NOASYNC | SEE_MASK_NOCLOSEPROCESS;
    info.lpFile = szExePath;
    info.lpParameters = szExeArgs;
    info.lpDirectory = szDirectory;
    info.nShow = SW_SHOW;
    if( !ShellExecuteEx( &info ) )
        return FALSE;

    // Wait for process to finish.
    WaitForSingleObject( info.hProcess, INFINITE );

    // Return exit code from process, if requested by caller.
    if( pdwExitCode )
        GetExitCodeProcess( info.hProcess, pdwExitCode );

    CloseHandle( info.hProcess );
    return TRUE;
}

BTW, both of these code snippets came from the legacy DirectX SDK (June 2010) sample "Autorun".

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