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How to convert UNIX timestamp to DateTime and vice versa?

I've got the following class:

[DataContractAttribute]
public class TestClass
{
  [DataMemberAttribute]
  public DateTime MyDateTime { get; set; }
}

Here's the JSON:

{ "MyDateTime":"1221818565" }

The JSON is being returned from a PHP webservice.

What I need to do, is convert that epoch string into a valid C# DateTime. What's the best way of doing this?

I can do this:

[IgnoreDataMemberAttribute]
public DateTime MyDateTime { get; set; }

[DataMemberAttribute(Name = "MyDateTime")]
public Int32 MyDateTimeTicks
{
  get { return this.MyDateTime.Convert(...); }
  set { this.Created = new DateTime(...); }
}

But the trouble with this is, the MyDateTimeTicks is public (changing it to private causes an exception in the serialization process)

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marked as duplicate by George Stocker Aug 9 '12 at 17:01

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
why do you care if MyDateTimeTicks is public? –  TheSoftwareJedi Oct 31 '08 at 0:39
1  
Because it's all part of the software contract. I don't want to expose any extra members than I have to - and it helps if those members are in a useful format for me to use (i.e. DateTime vs number / ticks). –  Mark Ingram Oct 31 '08 at 8:31

5 Answers 5

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Finishing what you posted, AND making it private seemed to work fine for me.

[DataContract]
public class TestClass
{

    private static readonly DateTime unixEpoch = new DateTime(1970, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, DateTimeKind.Utc);

    [IgnoreDataMember]
    public DateTime MyDateTime { get; set; }

    [DataMember(Name = "MyDateTime")]
    private int MyDateTimeTicks
    {
        get { return (int)(this.MyDateTime - unixEpoch).TotalSeconds; }
        set { this.MyDateTime = unixEpoch.AddSeconds(Convert.ToInt32(value)); }
    }

}
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Is that in Silverlight or .net / WPF? –  Mark Ingram Oct 31 '08 at 8:32
    
it's standard .net wcf. should work in either –  TheSoftwareJedi Oct 31 '08 at 15:42
    
Why is your code in the setter Convert.ToInt32(value) and not just value -- it's already an int, right? –  Kirk Woll Nov 7 '12 at 18:59

Here's what I've come up with. In C#, it looks like you need to create a new DateTime and add the epoch value as 'seconds' to this DateTime. Here's what it looks like in code:

new System.DateTime(1970, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0).AddSeconds(1221818565);

When using the Visual Studio immediate window, I printed the result of this operation to the debugger console:

{9/19/2008 10:02:45 AM}
    Date: {9/19/2008 12:00:00 AM}
    Day: 19
    DayOfWeek: Friday
    DayOfYear: 263
    Hour: 10
    Kind: Unspecified
    Millisecond: 0
    Minute: 2
    Month: 9
    Second: 45
    Ticks: 633574153650000000
    TimeOfDay: {10:02:45}
    Year: 2008
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2  
You should also specify DateTimeKind.Utc. –  dalle Nov 2 '08 at 11:05
private DateTime ConvertJsonStringToDateTime(string jsonTime)
        {
            if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(jsonTime) && jsonTime.IndexOf("Date") > -1)
            {
                string milis = jsonTime.Substring(jsonTime.IndexOf("(") + 1);
                string sign = milis.IndexOf("+") > -1 ? "+" : "-";
                string hours = milis.Substring(milis.IndexOf(sign));
                milis = milis.Substring(0, milis.IndexOf(sign));
                hours = hours.Substring(0, hours.IndexOf(")"));
                return new DateTime(1970, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, DateTimeKind.Utc).AddMilliseconds(Convert.ToInt64(milis)).AddHours(Convert.ToInt64(hours) / 100);                 
            }

            return DateTime.Now;
        }
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Is this better than the other answers? –  Austin Henley Sep 29 '12 at 1:40
    
This is what I was looking for. –  Telavian Oct 12 '12 at 21:32

I know your question was for PHP, but I just wanted to note a "gotcha" for .NET JSON: it appears that .NET gives you the date in "milliseconds since epoch" (as opposed to seconds). In this case, the AddSeconds line should be: unixEpoch.AddMilliseconds(Int64.Parse(date));

More info: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/marcelolr/archive/2008/03/05/system-datetime-ticks-vs-json-date.aspx

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What you want is the following:

DateTime unixEpoch = new DateTime(1970, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, DateTimeKind.Utc);
DateTime dotnetTime = unixEpoch.AddSeconds(Convert.ToDouble(ticks));

where ticks is the value passed to you by PHP.

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