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Running this:

import os

if __name__ == '__main__':
    exclude = os.path.join(
        r"C:\Dropbox\eclipse_workspaces\python\sync\.git", "info", "exclude")
    with open(exclude, 'w+') as excl:  # 'w' will truncate
        # print excl.read() # empty
        # excl.readall() # AttributeError: 'file' object has no attribute
        # 'readall' -- this also I do not understand
        excl.write('This will be written as expected if I comment the
         line below')
        print "Garbage\n\n", excl.read()
    # if I do not comment the line however, the file contains all the garbage
    # excl.read() just printed (edit: in addition to the line I wrote)

results in filling my file with garbage - why ? Also why readall is not resolved ?

Python 2.7.3

Latest iteration:

#!/usr/bin/env python2
import os

if __name__ == '__main__':
    exclude = os.path.join(r"C:\Users\MrD","exclude")
    with open(exclude,'w+') as excl:
        excl.write('This will be written if I comment the line below')
        print "Garbage\n\n",excl.read()
    # now the file contains all the garbage
    raw_input('Lol >')
share|improve this question
1  
Why do you expect there to be a .readall() method? –  Martijn Pieters Jul 26 '14 at 16:50
    
Can you show us the 'garbage' you are seeing? Because your file pointer is at the end of the file, and excl.read() returns an empty string at that point. –  Martijn Pieters Jul 26 '14 at 16:51
    
@MartijnPieters: Pycharm resolves it –  Mr_and_Mrs_D Jul 26 '14 at 16:51
    
No idea where PyCharm is getting that from, but there is no such method on Python file objects. –  Martijn Pieters Jul 26 '14 at 16:53
1  
Right, PyCharm is getting confused with the Python 3 io.RawIOBase type. –  Martijn Pieters Jul 26 '14 at 16:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You have hit a pecularity in the way I/O is implemented at the C level. When you opened the file in + mode (write and read in your case), then you must issue a flush or seek before 'switching' modes, otherwise the behaviour is undefined. In this case, you added uninitialised memory to the file.

There is a report for this in the Python issue tracker: http://bugs.python.org/issue1394612

The work-around is to seek back to start if you wanted to read back what you have written:

with open(exclude,'w+') as excl:
    excl.write('This will be written if I comment the line below')
    excl.seek(0)
    print "No more garbage\n\n", excl.read()

You could use a flush too:

with open(exclude,'w+') as excl:
    excl.write('This will be written if I comment the line below')
    excl.flush()
    print "No more garbage, eof so empty:\n\n", excl.read()
share|improve this answer
    
Ahaha add to this that I am a python newbie and you can imagine the depths of my wonder –  Mr_and_Mrs_D Jul 26 '14 at 18:21
    
And I just wanted a debug print ahahaha - nice –  Mr_and_Mrs_D Jul 26 '14 at 18:22
    
Btw the memory was initialized - when this first occured I was seeing the very file I was running in the garbage + the .git/config - I thought I was losing it :D –  Mr_and_Mrs_D Jul 26 '14 at 18:23
    
@Mr_and_Mrs_D: the initialised memory could easily contain data from a file buffer that is no longer used. :-) –  Martijn Pieters Jul 26 '14 at 18:29

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