Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Given an array of integers where some numbers repeat 1 time, some numbers repeat 2 times and only one number repeats 3 times, how do you find the number that repeat 3 times. Using hash was not allowed. Complexity of algorithm should be O(n)

share|improve this question
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/555744/… –  AVB Mar 23 '10 at 4:37
1  
without more information -- eg, all numbers are in the range [m..n] and every number in that range appears at least once -- this seems implausible –  Chris Dodd Mar 23 '10 at 5:13
3  
This is an interesting question and should not be closed. –  Pratik Deoghare Mar 23 '10 at 11:38
2  
Based on a number of things (the answers so far, none of which even come close to a correct solution - no offense, my own attempts at solving this and google searches) I think we don't have enough information to solve this. How big can the numbers be? Any memory constraints? If so, what are they? Where did you get the problem? If it was in a class, assignments are usually given for a specific subject you discussed previously, so what was it that you discussed in class before being given this assignment? Answering these questions might help us give you better answers. –  IVlad Mar 23 '10 at 14:35
3  
To the closers - how is this an exact duplicate? AB pointed to one question, but it is not the same, and I can't figure out how to solve this question based on the answer given in that one. –  David Johnstone Mar 23 '10 at 22:13

11 Answers 11

I assume the array is not sorted, or similary, repeats of a number don't appear in one contiguous run. Otherwise, the problem is really trivial: just scan the array once with a window of size 3, and if each number in that window is the same, then that's the number that repeats 3 times in one contiguous run.

If the repeats are scattered, then the problem becomes more interesting.

Since this is homework, I will only give you a hint.

This problem is a cousin of where you're given an array of unsorted integers, and all numbers appear an even number of times, except one that appears an odd number of times.

That number can be found quite easily in O(N) by performing an exclusive-or of all the numbers in the array; the result is the number that appears an odd number of times.

The reason why this works is that x xor x = 0.

So for example, 3 xor 4 xor 7 xor 0 xor 4 xor 0 xor 3 = 7.

share|improve this answer
9  
I'm interested in how exactly you plan on using xor, since this time you have more numbers that can appear an odd number of times (some numbers can appear a single time, then there's the one that appears 3 times). –  IVlad Mar 23 '10 at 6:42
6  
How can you be so sure this is homework? –  stubbscroll Mar 23 '10 at 11:35
1  
I would be very interested in being able to come up with a xor operation that would nullify for a given n > 1 ! –  Matthieu M. Mar 23 '10 at 16:42
1  
Since x + 2x = 3x this problem is considerably harder than the simple XOR case in base 2. Looking forward to seeing your proof polygene ... –  Ian Mercer Mar 25 '10 at 15:53
2  
@polygenelubricants : Can we have the answer now? –  nikhil Jul 20 '12 at 19:09

Essentially, the problem is to compute the mode of the array. This solution works "ONLY" if the array range is [0,n-1]. Putting the solution here since the problem does not put a clause of the range.

  • Assume that 'n' is the size of the array
  • Scan the array and mark A[A[i]]=A[A[i]]+n -----> 1st pass
  • Divide each array element by 'n', i.e A[i]=A[i]/n ----> 2nd pass
  • The element with the maximum value from the 2nd pass is the answer.

This is O(n) with O(1) space (but with a range clause).

I am not aware of any algorithm to compute the mode in O(n),O(1) with no clauses on the range.

share|improve this answer
    
You can also normalize the array input to 0,n-1 and your solution will be slightly more generic to handle the arrays with p,q ranges where q=p <= n. –  sharjeel Aug 25 '13 at 17:34

Use radix sort (which is linear in the number of bits required to specify the integers), then scan for the triplet.

share|improve this answer

Here's an answer that assumes max(A) is reasonably small, where A is the input array:

int ValidCount(int[] a, int[] b, int i, int n) {
  int num = a[i];
  int ret = 0;
  if (b[3*num] >= 0 && b[3*num] < n && a[b[3*num]] == num) ret++;
  if (b[3*num+1] >= 0 && b[3*num+1] < n && a[b[3*num+1]] == num) ret++;
  if (b[3*num+1] >= 0 && b[3*num+2] < n && a[b[3*num+2]] == num) ret++;
  b[3*num+ret] = i;
  return ++ret;
}

int threerep(int[] A, int aSize) {
  int *B = malloc(sizeof(int) * 3 * max(A, aSize)); /* Problematic if max(A) is large */
  /* Note that we don't rely on B being initialized before use */
  for(int i = 0; i < aSize; i++) {
    if (ValidCount(A, B, i, aSize) == 3) return A[i];
  }
  return ERROR_NO_ANSWER;
}
share|improve this answer

Well all I can think of is this but I'm sure your prof is looking for a tricky equation that will solve this in 1 scan. You can do it in 2 scans which is O(n) assuming that you can create a 2nd array of size (0 to max number in 1st array). Scan once, find max number in array. Create 2nd array of that size. Iterate over 1st array again using 2nd array as buckets to increment a count for each element in 1st array. Once you increment a bucket to 3 that's your solution. Not the best but it would work in some cases.

share|improve this answer

If you know min and max of the integer sequence and min>=0, create an array [min, max] filled with zeros. Scan the given array and if i occures, increment i-th position by one. After finishing you have frequency table in the second array, where the array position points to an integer.

share|improve this answer
    
If max - min >>> n, then this is not O(n). –  user287792 Mar 23 '10 at 14:28
    
algorithmist: there should be an option of using the sparse array (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sparse_array) then, like linked list. –  D_K Mar 25 '10 at 9:47
    
How do you propose to implement a sparse array with constant-time operations without hashing? –  user287792 Mar 25 '10 at 17:14
    
with list. Why do you need constant-time? –  D_K Mar 27 '10 at 18:03
int count[2^32];
for x in input:
  count[x] = 0;  // delete this loop if you can assume ram is cleared to 0.
for x in input:
  count[x]++;
for x in input:
  if count[x] == 3:
    return x

Please excuse the mix of languages :-) Also, this is really stupid to have an array that can be indexed with any integer - you can do it on a 64bit system and it does meet the requirements.

share|improve this answer
    
What if this is in some language like Python or Scheme that allows arbitrary sized integers? –  Gabe Mar 23 '10 at 17:39
    
This works in theory (assuming only 32 bit ints), but you're never (well, maybe not NEVER, but you get the point) going to be able to declare an array of 4 294 967 296 ints. –  IVlad Mar 23 '10 at 17:51
2  
-1: I've heard of trading space for time, but sweet jesus! A 32-bit int = 4 bytes, so a 2^32 int array is about 4 GB. The interview will end very quickly if someone wrote code like this. –  Juliet Mar 23 '10 at 17:57
    
You can declare the array on 64bit machine with 64bit OS. Other suggested scanning the input to determine the required size, while I just punted since it could be 4GB anyway. If you malloc it, it will not be zeroed and will be fast. –  phkahler Mar 24 '10 at 13:34
1  
@juliet - please point to a valid solution that works before you reject one because you don't like it. –  phkahler Mar 24 '10 at 13:38

This Algorithm looks pretty good one.... but i don't know its implementation.. Only pseudocode.... If any1 good try his hands on code(C programming), then please post it....

PseudoCode goes here... Take two bitset arrays of size n. We can use this array to count upto three occurrences i.e. if array1[i] = 1 and array2[i] = 1, then it means we have three occurrences of i+1th element.

for each integer 'i' if(array2[i] == 1) array2[i] = 0, array1[i] = 1; else array2[i] = 1;

for each element K in the arrays if (array1[k] && array2[k]) return k;

Complexity = O(n) and Space = 2n bits.

share|improve this answer

i dont see what all the fuss is about: using python 2.6 and a simple function which goes over the list, counts occurances, once it finds a number that occurs 3 times, returns it.

>>> def find3(l):
    from collections import defaultdict
    d = defaultdict(int)
    for n in l:
        d[n]+=1
        if d[n] == 3:
            return n


>>> print find3([1,1,1,2,3,4,5,6,7])
1
>>> print find3([1,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,5])
None
>>> print find3([1,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,5,4,5,5])
5
share|improve this answer
    
python has the benefit of an associative array, which is similar to using bucket sort or radix sort as suggested in other answers. it runs in O(n) but also uses space(n) –  shak Sep 9 '13 at 13:29
    
@shak Great, and I am sure you will also tell me why you added this comment almost a year after I provided this answer? Maybe you want to add your own answer? Maybe you want to provide a link to what you just mentioned? –  Inbar Rose Sep 9 '13 at 13:33

Bugaoo's algorithm looks neat that is quoted below. Actually, we can generalize it by doing an extra pass before "1st pass" to find min(A) and max(A) and another extra pass to move each element in A to the range of min(A) and max(A), i.e., A[0]-min(A). After "1st pass" and "2nd pass" (note that we should mod the elements by max(A)-min(A) instead of n), we could add min(A) to the duplicated number found at last.

Essentially, the problem is to compute the mode of the array. This solution works "ONLY" if the array range is [0,n-1]. Putting the solution here since the problem does not put a clause of the range. Assume that 'n' is the size of the arrayScan the array and mark A[A[i]]=A[A[i]]+n -----> 1st pass Divide each array element by 'n', i.e A[i]=A[i]/n ----> 2nd pass The element with the maximum value from the 2nd pass is the answer. This is O(n) with O(1) space (but with a range clause). I am not aware of any algorithm to compute the mode in O(n),O(1) with no clauses on the range.

share|improve this answer
void main()
{
    int a[10]={1,5,2,8,5,9,0,5,3,7}, n, i, j, k=0;
    int p;
    printf("\n");
    for(i=0; i<10; i++)
    {
        p=1;
        for(j=i+1; j<10; j++)
        {
            if(a[i]==a[j])
                p++;
        }
        if(p==3)
        {
            printf("the no is: %d",a[i]);
            getch();
            exit(0);
        }
    }
    printf("not available\n");
    getch();
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is not an instantiation of an O(n) algorithm. –  user287792 Apr 2 '10 at 17:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.