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There is this example code, but then it starts talking about millisecond / nanosecond problems.

Here is the same question on MSDN:

http://blogs.msdn.com/brada/archive/2004/03/20/93332.aspx

This is what I've got so far:

public Double CreatedEpoch
{
  get
  {
    DateTime epoch = new DateTime(1970, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0).ToLocalTime();
    TimeSpan span = (this.Created.ToLocalTime() - epoch);
    return span.TotalSeconds;
  }
  set
  {
    DateTime epoch = new DateTime(1970, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0).ToLocalTime();
    this.Created = epoch.AddSeconds(value);
  }
}
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12  
Just got a -1 vote here, on what grounds? –  Mark Ingram Oct 10 '12 at 15:20
2  
Epoch & Unix Timestamp Conversion Tools epochconverter.com ;) –  Soren Jan 8 '13 at 9:47

9 Answers 9

up vote 323 down vote accepted

Here's what you need:

public static DateTime UnixTimeStampToDateTime( double unixTimeStamp )
{
    // Unix timestamp is seconds past epoch
    System.DateTime dtDateTime = new DateTime(1970,1,1,0,0,0,0,System.DateTimeKind.Utc);
    dtDateTime = dtDateTime.AddSeconds( unixTimeStamp ).ToLocalTime();
    return dtDateTime;
}

Or, for Java (which is different):

public static DateTime JavaTimeStampToDateTime(double javaTimeStamp)
{
    // Java timestamp is millisecods past epoch
    System.DateTime dtDateTime = new DateTime(1970,1,1,0,0,0,0,System.DateTimeKind.Utc);
    dtDateTime = dtDateTime.AddSeconds(Math.Round(javaTimeStamp / 1000)).ToLocalTime();
    return dtDateTime;
}
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1  
AddSeconds doesn't seem to behave very well for values lesser than 0.1 milliseconds (iirc) –  Luk Nov 3 '08 at 17:32
2  
Time in Windows is handled by HAL and only close-to-accurate within 1ms to 15ms. More info is available in Windows Internals around page 112, if anyone is interested. –  Jim Schubert Apr 13 '12 at 14:59
22  
epoch is UTC, so you actually need: DateTime epoch = new DateTime(1970, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, DateTimeKind.Utc); in C#, otherwise you'll get local time. –  Malcolm Jul 7 '12 at 18:59
2  
This answer risks truncating the seconds... A double is a floating number. The argument should be int/long/etc. –  ccook Mar 4 '13 at 14:59
5  
Why you convert ToLocalTime ? –  bluesm Dec 3 '13 at 18:20

DateTime to UNIX timestamp:

public static double DateTimeToUnixTimestamp(DateTime dateTime)
{
    return (dateTime - new DateTime(1970, 1, 1).ToLocalTime()).TotalSeconds;
}
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"UTC does not change with a change of seasons, but local time or civil time may change if a time zone jurisdiction observes daylight saving time (summer time). For example, UTC is 5 hours ahead of (that is, later in the day than) local time on the east coast of the United States during winter, but 4 hours ahead while daylight saving is observed there."

So this is my code:

TimeSpan span = (DateTime.UtcNow - new DateTime(1970, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0,DateTimeKind.Utc));
double unixTime = span.TotalSeconds;
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2  
I wonder why this got a downvote? It seems to be similar to what Jon Skeet advocates in his answer here - stackoverflow.com/a/7983514/685760 –  Mr Moose Jun 1 '12 at 3:36
    
This one worked for me whereas Dmitry's version was one day off. –  tremby Aug 20 '12 at 17:50
1  
but this returns a double, I guess one needs to cast to long? –  knocte May 6 '13 at 6:25

To supplement ScottCher's answer, I recently found myself in the annoying scenario of having both seconds and milliseconds UNIX timestamps arbitrarily mixed together in an input data set. The following code seems to handle this well:

static readonly DateTime UnixEpoch = new DateTime(1970, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, DateTimeKind.Utc);
static readonly double MaxUnixSeconds = (DateTime.MaxValue - UnixEpoch).TotalSeconds;

public static DateTime UnixTimeStampToDateTime(double unixTimeStamp)
{
   return unixTimeStamp > MaxUnixSeconds
      ? UnixEpoch.AddMilliseconds(unixTimeStamp)
      : UnixEpoch.AddSeconds(unixTimeStamp);
}
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1  
Be careful when not using the DateTimeKind argument, since the constructed DateTime will be in the computer's local time (thanks for the code, Chris)! –  Sam Grondahl Sep 16 '13 at 22:40
    
This is exactly what I needed as well, thank you, @ChrisThoman. –  John Washam Jul 11 at 13:31

A Unix tick is 1 second (if I remember well), a .Net tick is 100 nanoseconds.

If you've been encountering problems with nanoseconds, you might want to try using AddTick(10000000 * value).

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1  
Unix is seconds past epoch - which is 1/1/70. –  ScottCher Oct 30 '08 at 14:44

I found the right answer just by comparing the conversion to 1/1/1970 w/o the local time adjustment;

DateTime date = new DateTime(2011, 4, 1, 12, 0, 0, 0);
DateTime epoch = new DateTime(1970, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0);
TimeSpan span = (date - epoch);
double unixTime =span.TotalSeconds;
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I guess Dump() is a LinqPad specific thing –  André Pena Aug 12 '11 at 20:35
    
@AndréPena Cursious reading your comment. The only thing I found was servicestack.net/mythz_blog/?p=202 which seems to come from code.google.com/p/servicestack/source/browse/trunk/Common/… –  kenny Sep 22 '11 at 11:05
    
you are correct @AndréPena I corrected the code snippet –  n8CodeGuru Oct 18 '12 at 16:06

I needed to convert a timeval struct (seconds, microseconds) containing UNIX time to DateTime without losing precision and haven't found an answer here so I thought I just might add mine:

DateTime _epochTime = new DateTime(1970, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, DateTimeKind.Utc);
private DateTime UnixTimeToDateTime(Timeval unixTime)
{
    return _epochTime.AddTicks(
        unixTime.Seconds * TimeSpan.TicksPerSecond +
        unixTime.Microseconds * TimeSpan.TicksPerMillisecond/1000);
}
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you are losing the microsecond precision by doing integer division and not using the modulus. –  Harrison Jan 24 at 2:45
    
@Harrison 1. I am most definitely not losing precision. 2. AddTicks receives a long value, you can't send it a modulus even if you had one. –  I3arnon Jan 24 at 9:50
1  
My Bad. I wasn't looking at it right. Sorry. –  Harrison Jan 24 at 15:54

Be careful! AddSeconds and AddMilliseconds cut off the microseconds in the double. These versions have high precision.

Unix -> DateTime

public static DateTime UnixTimestampToDateTime(double unixTime)
{
    DateTime unixStart = new DateTime(1970, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, System.DateTimeKind.Utc);
    long unixTimeStampInTicks = (long) (unixTime * TimeSpan.TicksPerSecond);
    return new DateTime(unixStart.Ticks + unixTimeStampInTicks);
}

DateTime -> Unix

public static double DateTimeToUnixTimestamp(DateTime dateTime)
{
    DateTime unixStart = new DateTime(1970, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, System.DateTimeKind.Utc);
    long unixTimeStampInTicks = (dateTime - unixStart).Ticks;
    return (double) unixTimeStampInTicks / TimeSpan.TicksPerSecond;
}
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DateTime unixEpoch = DateTime.ParseExact("1970-01-01", "yyyy-MM-dd", System.Globalization.CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
DateTime convertedTime = unixEpoch.AddMilliseconds(unixTimeInMillisconds);

Of course, one can make unixEpoch a global static, so it only needs to appear once in your project, and one can use AddSeconds if the UNIX time is in seconds.

To go the other way:

double unixTimeInMilliseconds = timeToConvert.Subtract(unixEpoch).TotalMilliseconds;

Truncate to Int64 and/or use TotalSeconds as needed.

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