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I'm using a BindingList<T> in my Windows Forms that contains a list of "IComparable<Contact>" Contact-objects. Now I'd like the user to be able to sort by any column displayed in the grid.

There is a way described on MSDN online which shows how to implement a custom collection based on BindingList<T> which allows sorting. But isn't there a Sort-event or something that could be caught in the DataGridView (or, even nicer, on the BindingSource) to sort the underlying collection using custom code?

I don't really like the way described by MSDN. The other way I could easily apply a LINQ query to the collection.

share|improve this question
up vote 16 down vote accepted

I higly appreciate Matthias' solution for its simplicity and beauty.

However, while this gives excellent results for low data volumes, when working with large data volumes the performance is not so good, due to reflection.

I ran a test with a collection of simple data objects, counting 100000 elements. Sorting by an integer type property took around 1 min. The implementation I'm going to further detail changed this to ~200ms.

The basic idea is to benefit strongly typed comparison, while keeping the ApplySortCore method generic. The following replaces the generic comparison delegate with a call to a specific comparer, implemented in a derived class:

New in SortableBindingList<T>:

protected abstract Comparison<T> GetComparer(PropertyDescriptor prop);

ApplySortCore changes to:

protected override void ApplySortCore(PropertyDescriptor prop, ListSortDirection direction)
{
    List<T> itemsList = (List<T>)this.Items;
    if (prop.PropertyType.GetInterface("IComparable") != null)
    {
        Comparison<T> comparer = GetComparer(prop);
        itemsList.Sort(comparer);
        if (direction == ListSortDirection.Descending)
        {
            itemsList.Reverse();
        }
    }

    isSortedValue = true;
    sortPropertyValue = prop;
    sortDirectionValue = direction;
}

Now, in the derived class one have to implement comparers for each sortable property:

class MyBindingList:SortableBindingList<DataObject>
{
        protected override Comparison<DataObject> GetComparer(PropertyDescriptor prop)
        {
            Comparison<DataObject> comparer;
            switch (prop.Name)
            {
                case "MyIntProperty":
                    comparer = new Comparison<DataObject>(delegate(DataObject x, DataObject y)
                        {
                            if (x != null)
                                if (y != null)
                                    return (x.MyIntProperty.CompareTo(y.MyIntProperty));
                                else
                                    return 1;
                            else if (y != null)
                                return -1;
                            else
                                return 0;
                        });
                    break;

                    // Implement comparers for other sortable properties here.
            }
            return comparer;
        }
    }
}

This variant requires a little bit more code but, if performance is an issue, I think it worths the effort.

share|improve this answer
1  
Some past developer implemented this in the same way in a Win Forms project that I'm working on, and I wanted to understand why. Now I know; it is better performance. This was an incredibly helpful post, because it not only shows you how to implement a solution, but explains in which scenarios this solution is better. +1 – Jim Sep 26 '12 at 15:31
    
Suggestion: Add a link to the file that the above code is modifying. – jm. Oct 16 '13 at 17:24
    
I recommend one small change, instead of sorting twice when you reverse the list just invert the comparer Comparison<T> comparer = GetComparer(prop); if (direction == ListSortDirection.Descending) { var original = comparer; comparer = (x, y) => original(y, x); } itemsList.Sort(comparer); – Scott Chamberlain Dec 4 '13 at 22:25

I googled and tried on my own some more time...

There is no built-in way in .NET so far. You have to implement a custom class based on BindingList<T>. One way is described in Custom Data Binding, Part 2 (MSDN). I finally produces a different implementation of the ApplySortCore-method to provide an implementation which is not project-dependent.

protected override void ApplySortCore(PropertyDescriptor property, ListSortDirection direction)
{
    List<T> itemsList = (List<T>)this.Items;
    if(property.PropertyType.GetInterface("IComparable") != null)
    {
        itemsList.Sort(new Comparison<T>(delegate(T x, T y)
        {
            // Compare x to y if x is not null. If x is, but y isn't, we compare y
            // to x and reverse the result. If both are null, they're equal.
            if(property.GetValue(x) != null)
                return ((IComparable)property.GetValue(x)).CompareTo(property.GetValue(y)) * (direction == ListSortDirection.Descending ? -1 : 1);
            else if(property.GetValue(y) != null)
                return ((IComparable)property.GetValue(y)).CompareTo(property.GetValue(x)) * (direction == ListSortDirection.Descending ? 1 : -1);
            else
                return 0;
        }));
    }

    isSorted = true;
    sortProperty = property;
    sortDirection = direction;
}

Using this one, you can sort by any member that implements IComparable.

Hope it helps to some developers out there.

Matthias

share|improve this answer
    
1+ Thank it's really helpfull – Abdullah BaMusa Apr 14 '09 at 8:53
6  
+1. Why didn't MS just implement this dozen lines of code in the class library in the first place? – Not Sure Jun 25 '09 at 21:55
    
Also see this post for information on how to emulate the Sort() behavior of List<T> for the SortableBindingList. <stackoverflow.com/questions/1063917/… Also note that the suggestion was made to disable notifications while sorting. An example of how to do that is included in the referenced discussion – Paul Prewett Jun 30 '09 at 15:45
    
This code just plugs right in, no changes needed. Brilliant! – Jarek Mitek Feb 7 '13 at 2:15

Here is an alternative that is very clean and works just fine in my case. I already had specific comparison functions set up for use with List.Sort(Comparison) so I just adapted this from parts of the other StackOverflow examples.

class SortableBindingList<T> : BindingList<T>
{
 public SortableBindingList(IList<T> list) : base(list) { }

 public void Sort() { sort(null, null); }
 public void Sort(IComparer<T> p_Comparer) { sort(p_Comparer, null); }
 public void Sort(Comparison<T> p_Comparison) { sort(null, p_Comparison); }

 private void sort(IComparer<T> p_Comparer, Comparison<T> p_Comparison)
 {
  if(typeof(T).GetInterface(typeof(IComparable).Name) != null)
  {
   bool originalValue = this.RaiseListChangedEvents;
   this.RaiseListChangedEvents = false;
   try
   {
    List<T> items = (List<T>)this.Items;
    if(p_Comparison != null) items.Sort(p_Comparison);
    else items.Sort(p_Comparer);
   }
   finally
   {
    this.RaiseListChangedEvents = originalValue;
   }
  }
 }
}
share|improve this answer

Here is a new implmentation using a few new tricks.

The underlying type of the IList<T> must implement void Sort(Comparison<T>) or you must pass in a delegate to call the sort function for you. (IList<T> does not have a void Sort(Comparison<T>) function)

During the static constructor the class will go through the type T finding all public instanced properties that implements ICompareable or ICompareable<T> and caches the delegates it creates for later use. This is done in a static constructor because we only need to do it once per type of T and Dictionary<TKey,TValue> is thread safe on reads.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Linq;
using System.Linq.Expressions;
using System.Reflection;

namespace ExampleCode
{
    public class SortableBindingList<T> : BindingList<T>
    {
        private static readonly Dictionary<string, Comparison<T>> PropertyLookup;
        private readonly Action<IList<T>, Comparison<T>> _sortDelegate;

        private bool _isSorted;
        private ListSortDirection _sortDirection;
        private PropertyDescriptor _sortProperty;

        //A Dictionary<TKey, TValue> is thread safe on reads so we only need to make the dictionary once per type.
        static SortableBindingList()
        {
            PropertyLookup = new Dictionary<string, Comparison<T>>();
            foreach (PropertyInfo property in typeof(T).GetProperties(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance))
            {
                Type propertyType = property.PropertyType;
                bool usingNonGenericInterface = false;

                //First check to see if it implments the generic interface.
                Type compareableInterface = propertyType.GetInterfaces()
                    .FirstOrDefault(a => a.Name == "IComparable`1" &&
                                         a.GenericTypeArguments[0] == propertyType);

                //If we did not find a generic interface then use the non-generic interface.
                if (compareableInterface == null)
                {
                    compareableInterface = propertyType.GetInterface("IComparable");
                    usingNonGenericInterface = true;
                }

                if (compareableInterface != null)
                {
                    ParameterExpression x = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T), "x");
                    ParameterExpression y = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T), "y");

                    MemberExpression xProp = Expression.Property(x, property.Name);
                    Expression yProp = Expression.Property(y, property.Name);

                    MethodInfo compareToMethodInfo = compareableInterface.GetMethod("CompareTo");

                    //If we are not using the generic version of the interface we need to 
                    // cast to object or we will fail when using structs.
                    if (usingNonGenericInterface)
                    {
                        yProp = Expression.TypeAs(yProp, typeof(object));
                    }

                    MethodCallExpression call = Expression.Call(xProp, compareToMethodInfo, yProp);

                    Expression<Comparison<T>> lambada = Expression.Lambda<Comparison<T>>(call, x, y);
                    PropertyLookup.Add(property.Name, lambada.Compile());
                }
            }
        }

        public SortableBindingList() : base(new List<T>())
        {
            _sortDelegate = (list, comparison) => ((List<T>)list).Sort(comparison);
        }

        public SortableBindingList(IList<T> list) : base(list)
        {
            MethodInfo sortMethod = list.GetType().GetMethod("Sort", new[] {typeof(Comparison<T>)});
            if (sortMethod == null || sortMethod.ReturnType != typeof(void))
            {
                throw new ArgumentException(
                    "The passed in IList<T> must support a \"void Sort(Comparision<T>)\" call or you must provide one using the other constructor.",
                    "list");
            }

            _sortDelegate = CreateSortDelegate(list, sortMethod);
        }

        public SortableBindingList(IList<T> list, Action<IList<T>, Comparison<T>> sortDelegate)
            : base(list)
        {
            _sortDelegate = sortDelegate;
        }

        protected override bool IsSortedCore
        {
            get { return _isSorted; }
        }

        protected override ListSortDirection SortDirectionCore
        {
            get { return _sortDirection; }
        }

        protected override PropertyDescriptor SortPropertyCore
        {
            get { return _sortProperty; }
        }

        protected override bool SupportsSortingCore
        {
            get { return true; }
        }

        private static Action<IList<T>, Comparison<T>> CreateSortDelegate(IList<T> list, MethodInfo sortMethod)
        {
            ParameterExpression sourceList = Expression.Parameter(typeof(IList<T>));
            ParameterExpression comparer = Expression.Parameter(typeof(Comparison<T>));
            UnaryExpression castList = Expression.TypeAs(sourceList, list.GetType());
            MethodCallExpression call = Expression.Call(castList, sortMethod, comparer);
            Expression<Action<IList<T>, Comparison<T>>> lambada =
                Expression.Lambda<Action<IList<T>, Comparison<T>>>(call,
                    sourceList, comparer);
            Action<IList<T>, Comparison<T>> sortDelegate = lambada.Compile();
            return sortDelegate;
        }

        protected override void ApplySortCore(PropertyDescriptor property, ListSortDirection direction)
        {
            Comparison<T> comparison;

            if (PropertyLookup.TryGetValue(property.Name, out comparison))
            {
                if (direction == ListSortDirection.Descending)
                {
                    _sortDelegate(Items, (x, y) => comparison(y, x));
                }
                else
                {
                    _sortDelegate(Items, comparison);
                }

                _isSorted = true;
                _sortProperty = property;
                _sortDirection = direction;

                OnListChanged(new ListChangedEventArgs(ListChangedType.Reset, property));
            }
        }

        protected override void RemoveSortCore()
        {
            _isSorted = false;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I understand all these answers were good at the time they were written. Probably they still are. I was looking for something similar and found an alternative solution to convert any list or collection to sortable BindingList<T>.

Here is the important snippet (link to the full sample is shared below):

void Main()
{
    DataGridView dgv = new DataGridView();
    dgv.DataSource = new ObservableCollection<Person>(Person.GetAll()).ToBindingList();
}    

This solution uses an extension method available in Entity Framework library. So please consider the following before you proceed further:

  1. If you don't want to use Entity Framework, its fine, this solution is not using it either. We are just using an extension method they have developed. The size of the EntityFramework.dll is 5 MB. If it's too big for you in the era of Petabytes, feel free to extract the method and its dependencies from the above link.
  2. If you are using (or would like to use) Entity Framework (>=v6.0), you've nothing to worry about. Just install the Entity Framework Nuget package and get going.

I have uploaded the LINQPad code sample here.

  1. Download the sample, open it using LINQPad and hit F4.
  2. You should see EntityFramework.dll in red. Download the dll from this location. Browse and add the reference.
  3. Click OK. Hit F5.

As you can see, you can sort on all four columns of different data types by clicking their column headers on the DataGridView control.

Those who don't have LINQPad, can still download the query and open it with notepad, to see the full sample.

share|improve this answer
    
The result is not a sortable binding list so if I got it correctly this beautiful solution works well only if your object (Person) is simple and all its properties are going to show in the table. – gneri Nov 12 '15 at 3:48
    
You don't have to display all properties in the grid. Try clicking any column header, it'll sort on that column so it is indeed a sortable binding list. And you're right, this solution is only for simple objects as it uses default comparers, however, we usually display and sort only primitive types, don't we? – Ravi M Patel Nov 12 '15 at 5:13

Not for custom objects. In .Net 2.0, I had to roll my on sorting using BindingList. There may be something new in .Net 3.5 but I have not looked into that yet. Now that there is LINQ and the sorting options that come with if this now may be easier to implement.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply. Sorting has become extremely easy with LINQ, but I have found no way to trigger when the user wished to sort the list... – Matthias Meid Oct 30 '08 at 11:13

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