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How do I override a class special method?

I want to be able to call the __str__() method of the class without creating an instance. Example:

class Foo:
    def __str__(self):
        return 'Bar'

class StaticFoo:
    @staticmethod
    def __str__():
        return 'StaticBar'

class ClassFoo:
    @classmethod
    def __str__(cls):
        return 'ClassBar'

if __name__ == '__main__':
    print(Foo)
    print(Foo())
    print(StaticFoo)
    print(StaticFoo())
    print(ClassFoo)
    print(ClassFoo())

produces:

<class '__main__.Foo'>
Bar
<class '__main__.StaticFoo'>
StaticBar
<class '__main__.ClassFoo'>
ClassBar

should be:

Bar
Bar
StaticBar
StaticBar
ClassBar
ClassBar

Even if I use the @staticmethod or @classmethod the __str__ is still using the built-in Python definition for __str__. It's only working when it's Foo().__str__() instead of Foo.__str__().

share|improve this question
    
-1: "call the __str__() method of the class without creating an instance". Breaks every understanding anyone has of what an object is. Please do not do this. It makes the program absolutely violate our most fundamental expectations. –  S.Lott Mar 23 '10 at 10:18
3  
I disagree. If you call str(MyClass) then there's no reason you would expect it to behave as though you just called str(myClassObject). That is, there are no fundamental expectations to begin with. I suspect he wants to create a static class and never intends to create any instances of it. –  Dan Homerick Jul 29 '10 at 23:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Special method __str__ defined in a class works only for the instances of that class, to have the different behavior for class objects you will have to do it in a metaclass of that class e.g. (python 2.5)

class Meta(type):
    def __str__(self):
        return "Klass"

class A(object):
    __metaclass__ = Meta

    def __str__(self):
        return "instance"

print A
print A()

output:

Klass
instance
share|improve this answer
    
I had to use the new py3 syntax of class C(metaclass=M): ... but it works! –  André Mar 23 '10 at 6:02

Why do you want to abuse the meaning of __str__? That method is reserved for the meaning "return a string representation of this instance".

If you want a function that just returns a static string, it would be better to have that as a separate function not inside a class.

If you want a constructor that returns a new string, name it something else so it's not clobbering the reserved __str__ name.

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I'm not sure what you are trying to do, exactly. Let me just add a bit of random information.

First, add this class:

class FooNew(object):
def __str__(self):
    return 'Fubar'

Print this instead:

if __name__ == '__main__':
    print "You are calling type for an old style class"
    print(Foo)
    print(type.__str__(Foo))
    print(Foo())
    print("But my Python 2.6 didn't match your output for print(Foo)")
    print("You are calling object.str() for a new style class")
    print(FooNew)
    print(object.__str__(FooNew))
    print(FooNew())
    print("Why do you want to change this?")

To get this:

You are calling type for an old style class
__main__.Foo
<class __main__.Foo at 0xb73c9f5c>
Bar
But my Python 2.6 didn't match your output for print(Foo)
You are calling object.str() for a new style class
<class '__main__.FooNew'>
<class '__main__.FooNew'>
Fubar
Why do you want to change this?

Are you absolutely sure you don't want to call a classmethod?

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